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What a horsesh*t chunk of worthless software. I think handing a blind 2-year old a crayon and a paper map would be easier, cleaner, more intuitive, and give you better results than trying to create and export a route. If I end up at the bottom of a ravine in the Hill Country tomorrow, blame Garmin.
 

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petevandyke said:
What a horsesh*t chunk of worthless software. I think handing a blind 2-year old a crayon and a paper map would be easier, cleaner, more intuitive, and give you better results than trying to create and export a route. If I end up at the bottom of a ravine in the Hill Country tomorrow, blame Garmin.
I use it all the time and like it just fine.

If you want to describe some specific problems you're having, I and others will be happy to help.

It is, admittedly, an acquired taste. I didn't care for Starbucks coffee the first time I tried it; now I make a bee line there every morning.
 

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Agree with Jim on this one.

Moved up from map source and it's a big improvement in my opinion.
 

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Old Slow Guy in A Fast Car
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I completely agree with you Pete and using it with a Mac if even more of a pain.
 

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JimE -

I usually agree with you and, in the case of all things Garmin and BasCamp, defer to your expertise.

But Starbucks?

Jeez Louise, man, try Peet's. Their French Roast is good for around-the-house coffee. Starbucks tastes burnt.

Worth the drive to Houston...

Tom

p.s. I've grown to really like BaseCamp. Took a while, but I use it exclusively.
 

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I felt the same way until I attended a seminar on how to use it conducted by Don Norwood. I love it much better now than Mapsource. But it is NOT intuitive. Once you learn how it operates it is way more powerful. If anything Garmin has dropped the ball on helping you learn how to use it.
 

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Mapsource?

I booted that up a couple of times, felt as if I was back in DOS world, and fled.

I got BaseCamp running. tried to follow the online tutorial without success and went back to MapQuest.

I now use Bing maps, and then enter the important point into mapquest, save it to my garmin gps.

Some day if I'm exceedingly bored I'll look at Base Cramp again.

bob
 

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I almost agree with you!

Is it easy to use? No! Absolutely not, it takes time to get to grips with it. However when you do you can use it to make some very nice routes which can be tailored to fit what you want, and where you want to go.

Can it be improved? Yes! It's search function is rather pathetic. However they are trying to improve it - the latest beta apparently has UK postcode searches, as well as an improved search functionality.

I had to sweat blood and tears to get to know Map-Source, and then I had to repeat the exercise with Base-Camp. However it is worth it in the end, also it works with the Garmin so you can keep a record of where you have gone (if your device handles tracks.) As well as being a one stop shop for all the historical routing.

If you need help, you can always ask, and if you have a zumo then have a look at Zumoforums.com. They are a friendly bunch there.

Best regards
Sleuth
 

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Sleuth said:
I almost agree with you!

Is it easy to use? No! Absolutely not, it takes time to get to grips with it. However when you do you can use it to make some very nice routes which can be tailored to fit what you want, and where you want to go.

Can it be improved? Yes! It's search function is rather pathetic. However they are trying to improve it - the latest beta apparently has UK postcode searches, as well as an improved search functionality.

I had to sweat blood and tears to get to know Map-Source, and then I had to repeat the exercise with Base-Camp. However it is worth it in the end, also it works with the Garmin so you can keep a record of where you have gone (if your device handles tracks.) As well as being a one stop shop for all the historical routing.

If you need help, you can always ask, and if you have a zumo then have a look at Zumoforums.com. They are a friendly bunch there.

Best regards
Sleuth
Sleuth, a big +1 to all your points.

To chime in a bit...

In my experience there are four things that give people fits when they begin working with BaseCamp, whether coming from MapSource or from online mapping programs like Google's or MapQuest's.

1. The BC data base. All of your objects (waypoints, routes, and tracks) are stored in a single data base, and you can tag items and place them into "lists". Lists are the fundamental organizational entity, and the concept is very powerful and useful. However, most newcomers that don't know about lists inevitably just work out of My Collection, and within a few minutes of playing around have a hopeless jumble of stuff from different trips and different parts of the country (or world) cluttering things up. It would be like if you went into your garage, took all of your tools and dumped them into a big 50 gallon drum, then tried to work out of that. Yes, you would hate it. So my advice #1 for newbies: learn how lists work. This may help .

2. BC "modality". We are spoiled by modern apps like Google Maps...we just start clicking and most of the time the program infers (usually correctly) what we want it to do. With BC, you have to explicitly tell it what "mode" that you want to be in. For example, if you want to edit a route, you have to tell it "I want to edit a route" (go into Insert mode) and then you can do it. If you want to move a waypoint, you have to click on the "move waypoint" tool to put it into that mode before you can do it. A bit cumbersome, but certainly not insurmountable once you crack the code.

3. BC does not "snap" like MapSource does. If you are modifying a route interactively, you can steer it completely offroad without any protest from BC. MS would "snap" to the road when you clicked, BC does not. I'm sure this is because BC also wants to provide support for hiking, off-road biking, etc. Of course it could have a preference to allow that, but for whatever reason Garmin has not addressed this in BC. Although this sounds really bad, in practice I have found it not to be too big a deal, as long as you develop the habit of making a quick "QC" pass on your route after you've built it. This approach is addressed in this demo .

4. BC search function. IMO, this is the worst "feature" of the program. Garmin knows it is bad, and as Sleuth notes they are addressing it. To what effect remains to be seen. I often use Google to find things, then get their lat/long and create a waypoint in BC using that. Since when I am choosing hotels or restaurants, I usually am on the web looking at reviews, etc. anyway, this is not much trouble. Also, I almost always use Google Street View to sanity check any destination, if for no other reason to know what it's going to look like when I get there, so if my destination if half a block down the side street, or tucked in behind another building, I know what to expect. My philosophy here is to think of BC as a wrench; it is a useful tool to have, but it's a single tool, not a whole toolbox. Use the right tool for the job at hand.

Using Google to get lat/longs to create waypoints in BC is addressed in this demo, but with a couple of notes needed:
1. To easily get lat/longs from Google Maps, you need to enable the "drop lat/lng feature" by clicking on the Maps Labs link at the bottom of the Google Map left panel:
.
Note that if you are logged in to Google Maps, it will remember that setting for you whenever you are logged in. If you are not logged in, you will have to re-enable it or log in.

2. There's a cleaner way to create the waypoint in BC than what I show here, and that is to use Find>Locate Coordinates.... It will give you the option of creating a waypoint from the coordinates. (Be sure you're in the right list when you do this.)​

Hope that helps a little.
 

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I also had a horrible time at first, then with help from the community I realized that while using it with my device connected to access my maps that the tool was dependant on the processor spead of my Nav IV and I needed to work in smaller increments to avoid locking my system up. So once I slowed down the system really began to work for me.

Tuck
 

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I've had good look with tyre, here: http://www.tyretotravel.com/ I originally used it when I had a cheap TomTom, but I now use it with the Nav IV. You can simply drag your route to where you want it. I find it pretty intuitive.

Dale
 

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12R12RT said:
Jeez Louise, man, try Peet's. Their French Roast is good for around-the-house coffee. Starbucks tastes burnt.

Worth the drive to Houston...

Tom[/QUOTE

I agree fully about Starbucks. Overpriced, over roasted, over hyped.

Anybody wanting a great dark roast coffee really needs to try Community Coffee Dark Roast. This is also a family-owned company that has been around a long time. I have converted a lot of coffee drinkers all over the country to this brand.

http://www.communitycoffee.com/


Back to topic: I am a Mac user, and I can do routes quicker on the GPS.
 

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I use BC on my MAC and Dell laptop and like it much better than Mapsource. To be fair though I only use tracks so I might not be getting to experience some of the suckiness that others are complaining about.
 

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stupid question- what's a track in re: to how it's used in this thread? same as route? :confused:
 

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bikerj said:
stupid question- what's a track in re: to how it's used in this thread? same as route? :confused:
To put it simply
Route - is where you would like to go
Track - is where you have been

I use tracks to see where I have been as well as how I performed against the designed route. Also it is useful to see how to get to a place or a great route that you would like to go/use again.
 

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Sleuth said:
To put it simply
Route - is where you would like to go
Track - is where you have been

I use tracks to see where I have been as well as how I performed against the designed route. Also it is useful to see how to get to a place or a great route that you would like to go/use again.
Thanks. Your definition makes sense. :wave
 

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I do a lot of adventure riding and use tracks that I download from various sites. Last year I did the Utah Backcountry Discover Route (UTBDR). This year it will be Wyoming, Idaho and Washington (WABDR). You can get the track for free at: http://www.backcountrydiscoveryroutes.com/

Without the tracks, and with my unique sense of direction, I would be lost most of the time. Using BaseCamp for tracks really is nice because I can get all my tracks in a single file. Also just an FYI, and not related to BC; I have a Garmin 60CSX that is limited to 20 tracks of 500 points each. But using some third party software you can convert any/all tracks to an "map overlay" which means I am no longer limited to 20 tracks. I can have as many track and points as I want, which is really nice for those long adventure rides when I'm out in the boonies for weeks on end.
 
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