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Discussion Starter #1
I've had a Slime inflator for a while(5-10yrs), but it's getting tired.
I've been reading up on the cycle pump EXPEDITION inflator & it sounds pretty good, but about $150...
What's the good guidance on "the" inflator to get & carry in my side bag?
 
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I have a Thomas air pump installed where the canister was on my LT. I carry a harbor freight $10 unit with the plastic case removed in my GT.
 

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I've had a Slime inflator for a while(5-10yrs), but it's getting tired.
I've been reading up on the cycle pump EXPEDITION inflator & it sounds pretty good, but about $150...
What's the good guidance on "the" inflator to get & carry in my side bag?
I probably have had the same tiny Slime inflator for 8 years. Have only used it about 10 times but I have (or had) an SAE pigtail to the battery and a ten foot extension and it served me well, can get lost in a duffle. I thought about permanently mounting something but I did hand it off to someone who had to go find the bike that was flat and I was in bed so that worked out, lol.
 

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I carry Slime for the inflation. I haven't used the one in the bike yet. But, I have an older system in the car that I have used many times to inflate to proper levels or inflate to get to the nearest fix.
I had slime in a tire once and it survived a screw in the tire. I don't even know how long the screw was in the tire. I saw it in the morning and the tire was fully inflated still. Oddly, I haven't put slime in the tires for my LT...maybe I should put that on the list.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Guitarjim, just to clarify, i am talking about small compressor type inflators that plug into the bike's electrical system, & are used to reinflate a low pressure tire.
The aging one that I have now was made by the "slime" company. It is a nice compact unit, but it's getting tired.
I've never used slime, itself, but have wondered how well it works.
 

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Guitarjim, just to clarify, i am talking about small compressor type inflators that plug into the bike's electrical system, & are used to reinflate a low pressure tire.
The aging one that I have now was made by the "slime" company. It is a nice compact unit, but it's getting tired.
I've never used slime, itself, but have wondered how well it works.
Timely clarification regarding the sticky gooey type of liquid patch crap. Some of the vilest profanity I have ever heard has been when at a tire shop as some unlucky worker encounters that mess when changing a tire! I have used it on small lawn equipment tires, but nothing I would take to someone else to have to deal with.
 
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LarryJa - yes, the slime brand inflator. The first one worked so well on the car, I got one for the bike as well - in a smaller package.
Tiger - yes, I can understand the predicament. So, tell the person changing the tire to be prepared for the slime. Just another day in a modern office...
 

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I have a Stop-n-Go mini Air Compressor kit. It's very compact and works wonderfully. Here are a few pics. My business card is in the pictures as a size reference.
 

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I've had have the cycle pump expedition inflator for about 3 years now. I've used it for several flat tires and for topping off my tires whenever they needed it. I'm very happy with it and I recommend it highly.
 

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Not quite as small and if you can get over it being a cheesy "As Seen on TV" product, check out the Air Hawk. Cordless! or corded. Best thing about it is that you set the pressure, pull the trigger and it inflates to that pressure - Brilliant!!! No more, add, check, add check, add, check. Screw it to the valve, pull the trigger and I sometimes walk off and fiddle with something else until it stops. I see they have come down in price too.

https://www.asseenontvexpress.com/products/air-hawk?variant=12442370474045&utm_campaign=gs-2018-08-06&utm_source=google&utm_medium=smart_campaign
 

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After going through the below experience and no longer wanting to put my faith in cheap plastic compressors I bought one of these to carry on my motorcycles, https://bestrestproducts.com/shop/cyclepump-ez-gauge/cyclepump-expedition-tire-inflator/cyclepump-expedition-tire-inflator/ . Excellent tire pump.

Last year while riding up to Crown King in my UTV I got a flat tire, the driver's side rear tire to be more precise. I discovered it was nearly flat at Crown King as my girlfriend and I were about to walk into a restaurant. After finishing our meal I set to the task of plugging or replacing the flat tire. I do have a spare mounted on the back of the Teryx4 but I thought I would try to plug the tire to get back to Lake Pleasant where my trailer and truck were located.

So I find the hole in the tire and plug the hole with a Stop & Go mushroom plug, https://www.stopngo.com/tubeless-pun...scooters-atvs/. Then I go to air up the tire and use the Stop & Go crappy compressor that comes with the Stop & Go plug kit. It turns on and makes lots of noise but no air come out of the hose. So much for Plan A.

Plan B. I grab the small cloth bag that contains another small compressor, something sold by Aerostitc, Aerostich Mini Compressor - Pumps & Air Compressors - Tire Repair - Tools - A to B :: Aerostich Motorcycle Jackets, Suits, Clothing, & Gear , but when I pull it out of the bag it's in pieces and therefore it isn't going to be airing up anything........ ever again.

Plan C. Plan C was going to be replacing the flat tire and wheel with the spare on the back. But upon opening my tool bag to get some tools to do so I discovered another small air compressor that I had forgotten about. I hook the compressor up and it works, sort of, vibrating and doing some sort of dance jumping around on the ground but it fills the tire to 16 psi in 10 minutes or so. When I check the tire plug for air leaks by spitting on the plug, I see a bit of air escaping from the repair. It's a slow leak and I can monitor the amount of air loss because I have tire pressure senders on each wheel's air valve stem and each tire's pressure is displayed on my Garmin GPS.

Now you may be asking yourself, if he had tire pressure monitors on each wheel how come he didn't know he was getting a flat? Good question which I will explain now. I have no doubt that the GPS display did show a screen warning me about the low pressure in the tire, but unless I'm looking right at the GPS I'm not going to see the warning or know about the impending flat tire. The GPS also makes an audible warning but the GPS wasn't hooked into my Bluetooth headset or Bluetooth transmitter.

On the trip back to the trailer I needed to stop a few times to add more air to the semi-repaired tire. Each time I start up the compressor my girlfriend and I watch in amusement as the compressor did it's bouncy dance on the ground. But we got back to the truck and trailer and we drive home.

That night I did some internet research looking for a new and more robust compressor to carry on the Teryx. This is what I bought, https://www.viaircorp.com/portables/87p , that I got from Amazon delivered for $46.89. I must say the Viair it is impressive, solidly built, quiet and doesn't dance around when it's running.

At the same time I also bought CyclePump Expedition Tire inflator to carry on my motorcycles, which don't have the ability to carry a spare. The CyclePump while being more expensive is an excellent unit that will hopefully be more reliable than the cheap plastic air pumps.

So what I'm trying to convey here is, do yourself a favor and get a decent compressor if you travel on roads far from home and cell phone coverage. I can tell you from personal experience that it's no fun being stranded on a rarely traveled piece of road in WY with a flat tire you can't fix well enough to get you riding again.
 
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I have an Airman Sparrow that I carried on the FJR and it works well. It is very good quality, and I could probably inflate a car tire, but it is bit larger than I would like.


Also I see it is no longer available on Amazon so not sure what is going on. I picked mine up for $20 but maybe that was a clearance price?

https://www.amazon.com/Airman-C60A54-Tour-Pump-Compressor/dp/B002UEKXOW/

If I didn't have one already, I would probably get that Aerostich one for $40. The RTW does not have very much built in storage like the FJR had under the seat.
 

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Got the little slime compressor. Same one as you have.
 

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Used the Slime compressor on my car (the one that stays in the car) yesterday and in a couple of minutes it had my tire up from 22psi to 36psi. These compressors are small and s l o w but it worked just right. The one in my bike is still new in the box.
 

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I didn't hit send last night. Whatever compressor you choose, when you use it start up your bike and the voltage supplied will be 14.2 vdc rather than the 12.5 with the bike not running. This will make a huge difference in compressor speed.
 

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Definitely don't want to drain my battery by not having the bike running. I left the car running while pumping up the car tire too.
 

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I agree the stopngo is very well made and thought out. Works . Saw factory guy demo it at Americade a few years back and used it 2 months later just as easy.
 
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