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2016 R1200RT, 44K miles, all maintenance done at recommended intervals and with the proper spec oil.

I have noticed lately that when I back my bike out of the garage (engine off) that it takes a bit more inertia to get the bike rolling with the clutch pulled in and the bike still in 1st gear. I am wondering if this is a sign that the clutch is wearing.

When the bike it running and under normal operation it works fine. I don't slip the clutch much and I use the quickshifter most of the time, so I would think that the amount of wear should be lower than normal for a bike with this mileage.

This is my first bike with a wet clutch, so I really don't know what to look for in terms of knowing when the clutch should be replaced. Will it slip under hard throttle like a dry clutch does? What are the signs that its on its way out? Also, what's the typical life span of a wethead clutch mileage wise?
 

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2018 R1200RT
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2016 R1200RT, 44K miles, all maintenance done at recommended intervals and with the proper spec oil.

I have noticed lately that when I back my bike out of the garage (engine off) that it takes a bit more inertia to get the bike rolling with the clutch pulled in and the bike still in 1st gear. I am wondering if this is a sign that the clutch is wearing.

When the bike it running and under normal operation it works fine. I don't slip the clutch much and I use the quickshifter most of the time, so I would think that the amount of wear should be lower than normal for a bike with this mileage.

This is my first bike with a wet clutch, so I really don't know what to look for in terms of knowing when the clutch should be replaced. Will it slip under hard throttle like a dry clutch does? What are the signs that its on its way out? Also, what's the typical life span of a wethead clutch mileage wise?
Not sure of the answer to your question. 44K miles isn't a whole lot of miles for a clutch, dry or wet. I replaced one at about 50 K miles on an old RT-P, but that bike had been abused by multiple riders. In fact, it was the tranny that failed first, i.e. those clutch plates had life on 'em, but unfortunately, oil too. 馃槒

However, clutch plates can stick, usually on bikes that sit for a while, with less frequent use, or in humid weather. That's with a dry clutch, so I'm not certain if the same applies to a wet clutch (probably not humidity, but sitting in a cold garage with heavy oil on 'em might do it). Work the clutch a bit, i.e. start neutral, warm bike up, ride, shutdown, leave in 1st, start in gear with clutch engaged, etc..
 

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To each his own, What got me going on the R1200RT-LC in general was a test ride on a 2 year old 2014 (at the time) with 36k miles from a BMW authorized dealer. This bike had some real miles in a short time and proved it by having a slipping clutch, BUT an excellent bike all in all. When I told the dealer it was a great test ride, but the bike has a slipping clutch they laughed at me, oh well.
It wasn鈥檛 till a few others made the same statement after riding this bike did the dealer acknowledge it and replaced the clutch, but by that time I had bought a new 2016 R1200RT from another dealer.

So my take away is a H2o RT can eat a clutch, though IMHO it would be rare鈥

Personally I鈥檓 expecting bout 100k miles out of mine 馃憤

Enjoy!
 

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2016 R1200RT
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A dragging clutch is an indication that the clutch plates are worn and staring to warp another indication is hard to get in to neutral too

It also can mean that the clutch fluid needs changing too I would start with that as its the cheapest solution
 
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