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The job took about 11 hours from start to finish with the help from Lee Wilson & the owner of the LT. The LT fell over in a parking lot while on the side stand with the J-Peg in the extended position. About five hours of the repair was spent taking extra caution to protect the electrical components.
 

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Well as evident in image number 6, you guys did the prep work and the end result, in my mind, looks outstanding and I'm sure by the clean look, will hold with no problem.

Good Job all.
 

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Looks very good to me. The worst that could happen is that it broke off again,...& I don't think that would happen unless the bike got dropped ...again... & if it did , it would probably take a lot less time to weld it back on. Now that you have the technique down.:wave
 

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Good photos Dave. I see we can't get away from Duct Tape even on motorcycles :D
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The job took about 11 hours from start to finish with the help from Lee Wilson & the owner of the LT. The LT fell over in a parking lot while on the side stand with the J-Peg in the extended position. About five hours of the repair was spent taking extra caution to protect the electrical components.
For BMW forever on his thread on his ABS Question
 

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I don't remember how much it cost. I ground a V where it was welded & made several thin welding passes letting it cool down between passes. It was only welded on the outside.
 

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I did all the prep work & hired a welder from where I worked. He Tig welds all day long.
 

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Is welding just the outside strong enough to handle the crash bar and the force it endures ?
Not a welding expert but when he said he ground a V into the crack, he allowed much deeper penetration of the weld much further back into the crack by filling the gap rather than simply placing a bead over the top. I bet that fix was pretty strong in the end and it looked fantastic. That guy was an artist. JMO but if you can find someone who can do the same, I think it would be close to as strong as the original cast piece.
 

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The repair looks very good. If I remember correctly, didn't insurance companies total LT's when this part broke? If so, there are probably lots of bikes out there that could "easily" be brought back to life.
 

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Not a welding expert but when he said he ground a V into the crack, he allowed much deeper penetration of the weld much further back into the crack by filling the gap rather than simply placing a bead over the top. I bet that fix was pretty strong in the end and it looked fantastic. That guy was an artist. JMO but if you can find someone who can do the same, I think it would be close to as strong as the original cast piece.
Can you please explain what "ground a V into the crack" actually means? What is a V ?

Thank you.
 

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Can you please explain what "ground a V into the crack" actually means? What is a V ?

Thank you.
For thick pieces that have broken, if you look at the letter V, grind away some of the metal from the front side to form a V between the two pieces. When you start to weld, you are able to join the two pieces deep in the V and that is closer to the back side. Doing this in layers, fills the V from the back to the front starting at the . and working your way out. That method makes a weld that encompasses more of the broken face rather than just welding across the front side. Yes, there will be some penetration of the weld from the top but most of the cracked face will still be broken behind the weld. It is much stronger to do it like the guy Dave hired.


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Not sure my ASCII picture does it justice but you might be able to get the idea. I am attaching a picture of how this is done for welding two pipes together. The principal is the same. You fill the V as you weld and you get more of the surface involved in the actual weld.
 

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Bike prep? Unplug all computers and battery? Wrap sensitive electronics in aluminum foil hats? :surprise:
 

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Bike prep? Unplug all computers and battery? Wrap sensitive electronics in aluminum foil hats? :surprise:
Unhooking the positive battery terminal should be sufficient.
 

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For thick pieces that have broken, if you look at the letter V, grind away some of the metal from the front side to form a V between the two pieces. When you start to weld, you are able to join the two pieces deep in the V and that is closer to the back side. Doing this in layers, fills the V from the back to the front starting at the . and working your way out. That method makes a weld that encompasses more of the broken face rather than just welding across the front side. Yes, there will be some penetration of the weld from the top but most of the cracked face will still be broken behind the weld. It is much stronger to do it like the guy Dave hired.


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- ___________
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Not sure my ASCII picture does it justice but you might be able to get the idea. I am attaching a picture of how this is done for welding two pipes together. The principal is the same. You fill the V as you weld and you get more of the surface involved in the actual weld.
Thank you for the explanation.

How do you keep/hold the small broken piece in place (lined up) while you weld it to the rest of the frame that it broke out of ?
 

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Thank you for the explanation.

How do you keep/hold the small broken piece in place (lined up) while you weld it to the rest of the frame that it broke out of ?
For that you have to get creative. Not sure just how I would do it in this case but I have several types of clamps that might allow me to hold one side and start welding on the other until I had something actually welded to hold it in place for additional welding passes to fill in. It has a threaded hole in it already so making something to bolt to it to hold it in place might work.

In looking at the too bright to see welding in progress pic 5, it looks like they may have used the tipover frame to hold it in place as the welding started. Not sure if it remained during the entire process. Never used a TIG before. I can also see in pic 4 where the metal was ground on the broken tab for the V that Dave mentioned.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
The tip over bar was used to align the tab to the frame. The bar was left on while it was welded. The LT has been rode about 50,000 miles since then.
 
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