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Discussion Starter #1
I'm sure most of you here have been down this road.
Thought I'd post this to take some of the mystery out for the newbie's to the K1200 (like me).

Put the bike on the centerstand.
Shift the tranny into 5th gear. Rock the rear tire as needed while holding up on the lever until you feel each gear engage.
Remove the fairing's & bracket's to get to this point. Engine must be cool.
Before removing the 11 cover screws, use an airhose (if you have one) to blow away all dust & debris. Use an old toothbrush to clean around all the gasket.



Put a drip pan under the cover. Oil pools near the front where the timing chain is. Pull the cover, it should look like this.



Now rotate the rear wheel (as if the bike is moving forward) until one set of cam lobes is pointing directly away from the round cam bucket below it. Make your measurement's on both lobes (2ea. per intake & exhaust) and make a note of the measurement and location. Spec limit's are on this site. Don't really want to type them all out.



Rotate tire tire some more until you see another lobe at 180 degree's from it's bucket. Measure, make a note, etc. until all four cylinders (16 lobes) are completed.
Hopefully, everything measures within spec. Very happy to report mine did. First time I've checked them, bought the bike with 55k on it. Yay!



I apply assembly lube when I have an engine exposed. Rub some on each lobe.





Clean inside the cover, the bolts, etc..





With that all complete, thoroughly clean the gasket surfaces and the gasket. Stuff a clean rag / paper towel around the exposed engine parts as needed.
The gasket can be reused if it's in good shape. After everything is cleaned, apply sealant to the corners of the 1/2 round section on the gasket.
A dab will do ya..



I apply a small dab on the mating surface.



Also apply sealant in these areas. They don't meet up perfectly.







Carefully install the cover. Sung the two cover bolts on the right side and the one on the middle inside. They help line up the gasket. Install the rest of the bolts. Use a cross pattern an sung them all down. Use a torque wrench if needed. DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN. The bolts are made to bottom on the engine surface. It will be a big deal if you strip one of these.



Wipe off any excess sealant the oozed out near the half rounds. Looks very unprofessional to me when I see an engine with sealant goober-ed around it.
Makes me wonder what kind of work was performed below...

Let the bike sit for a while, allowing the sealant to dry. Sit back on your now fatter wallet, have a cold one, (JD & coke for me) and admire your work.

Regards, Ken
 

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Great pixs
I appreciate the time you took to take the pixs, that you have taken time to pass along great tips, and the time it took you to post all of this.

My Best from t'son
Bob
 

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Great thread, Ken. New LT riders are sure to benefit from the good info. And for those who find valve adjustments are needed, this archived guide should be in everyone's bookmark list. Not to worry that it's a K1200RS bike - the engine is the same as in the LT. There may also be some additional information at the Illinois BMW riders site, hosted by Kirk (14wntr) - see his signature block for correct link.

Thanks again, Ken. Good tip on using compressed air to blow out gunk and help keep work area clean.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks all.
Trying to do my part to help. I search the other DIY's posted here and read though the manual before performing these procedures. Must have missed Kirk's video. Watched a few others and have definitely learned from them (Thank's Kirk). Didn't see many post's with pic's so I thought this might add to those that have described this before.

I've only ridden it the bike on the test ride and then to my garage. Prior to purchase, I found out the bike only had less than 1000 miles put on it in the last two years. Called the dealership that sold it two years ago and the only service they performed was an oil change & new battery. They didn't have any prior history they could relay to me. I wish the service history on these would be logged and passed on to all dealerships but that doesn't seem to be the case. So I'm going through the maintenance schedule laundry list and repairing / replacing anything else I see along the way.

After pulling the valve cover, it looks to me like this engine been feed synthetic oil over the last 11 years and 55k miles (03 LT). Very clean inside. That said, I think I'm going to skip checking the timing chain tensioner lining. From what I've read here, it hasn't been an issue.

Brake, clutch, final drive, tranny, & radiator fluid changes are next.

Regards, Ken

BTW - New tires from DK came today.
Kind of strange but in the 45+ years I've been riding, this is the first set of tires I'm going to need to have someone else mount.. Always done my own with tire irons. Don't want to scratch or mar these wheels.
 

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BTW - New tires from DK came today.
Kind of strange but in the 45+ years I've been riding, this is the first set of tires I'm going to need to have someone else mount.. Always done my own with tire irons. Don't want to scratch or mar these wheels.
Ken - Since you live close by, thought I'd relay that Honda of Florence mounted my tires that I got from DK and did a good job.

I haven't done valve check yet, but I only have 16k miles so I thought I can wait awhile.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ken - Since you live close by, thought I'd relay that Honda of Florence mounted my tires that I got from DK and did a good job.
Thanks Jim. And thanks again for the info you gave when we met. Much appreciated. Good to hear they did a good job mounting yours. I'll use them to mount these after I put a few miles on the old ones. Just placed an order for a few seals,etc. Can't wait it get er on the road!

Ken
 

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I saw Kirk's video and it was excellent.

My bike is at 42K km. So I'm pretty sure the valves are ok, but I'll check 'em anyways.

Kirks video really, really explains how to do this job.

This weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
?...Honda of Florence mounted my tires that I got from DK and did a good job....
?...Good to hear they did a good job mounting yours. I'll use them to mount these....
After posting the above, I got to thinking..
Don't know why but I was in the mindset I needed a tire station tool ($1500 ~$2500) to properly remove & install tires on alloy wheels.
I've always purchased quality tools needed to get the job done. Never had a bike with alloy wheels and couldn't justify the cost of a tool described above.

With the purchase of my LT, I now have the need.
Going to start a new thread to get others opinion's on affordable, quality tire hand tools. If your reading this thread and want to contribute, search "tire removal/installation & balance tools"

Regards, Ken
 

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Hey, Ken - ping Stevie aka katnapinn about tire changing gear. That feller does tire changing for a living (among several other nefarious jobs like towing and roadside rescue) and has been thru a few brands of equipment. Another prospect for experience would be Mark Griner aka UncleMark. He's done a few and has settled on the best for him. Good luck.


After posting the above, I got to thinking..
Don't know why but I was in the mindset I needed a tire station tool ($1500 ~$2500) to properly remove & install tires on alloy wheels.
I've always purchased quality tools needed to get the job done. Never had a bike with alloy wheels and couldn't justify the cost of a tool described above.

With the purchase of my LT, I now have the need.
Going to start a new thread to get others opinion's on affordable, quality tire hand tools. If your reading this thread and want to contribute, search "tire removal/installation & balance tools"

Regards, Ken
 

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After posting the above, I got to thinking..
Don't know why but I was in the mindset I needed a tire station tool ($1500 ~$2500) to properly remove & install tires on alloy wheels.
I've always purchased quality tools needed to get the job done. Never had a bike with alloy wheels and couldn't justify the cost of a tool described above.

With the purchase of my LT, I now have the need.
Going to start a new thread to get others opinion's on affordable, quality tire hand tools. If your reading this thread and want to contribute, search "tire removal/installation & balance tools"

Regards, Ken
BTDT. :)
 
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