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So on my way to work this morning I am turning right at a traffic light when the car in front of me suddenly stopped to let an ambulance coming the other way by (no lights on). I didn't have time or space to get the bike upright and handlebars straight before I stopped so down she went. Even though I know better I must have tried to stop it and badly strained my hamstring. So now both the LT and me are on the ground, I get up but can't put any weight on my right leg let alone pick the big girl up. The two EMTs and a couple of other guys came over and picked it up for me. No damage - just the same scrapes as before.

I got back on and rode the rest of the way to work and had to park it on the side stand (a first for me). I am hobbling around and wondering if I can get my bike home.

The only other time something similar happened was when I was taking an MSF class and practicing an e-stop in a curve. The drill is to brake, and just before stopping straighten out and get the bike upright. Easier said than done. That time I just stepped off without hurting myself. Once my strain heals I guess it's time to get out and practice that maneuver some more.
 

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So on my way to work this morning I am turning right at a traffic light when the car in front of me suddenly stopped to let an ambulance coming the other way by (no lights on). I didn't have time or space to get the bike upright and handlebars straight before I stopped so down she went. Even though I know better I must have tried to stop it and badly strained my hamstring. So now both the LT and me are on the ground, I get up but can't put any weight on my right leg let alone pick the big girl up. The two EMTs and a couple of other guys came over and picked it up for me. No damage - just the same scrapes as before.

I got back on and rode the rest of the way to work and had to park it on the side stand (a first for me). I am hobbling around and wondering if I can get my bike home.

The only other time something similar happened was when I was taking an MSF class and practicing an e-stop in a curve. The drill is to brake, and just before stopping straighten out and get the bike upright. Easier said than done. That time I just stepped off without hurting myself. Once my strain heals I guess it's time to get out and practice that maneuver some more.
Sorry she went down on you Jim but glad you have only minor related injuries. I know well that scenario as do most others.

Hope you manage to get the old girl home safely and heal quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Sorry she went down on you Jim but glad you have only minor related injuries. I know well that scenario as do most others.

Hope you manage to get the old girl home safely and heal quickly.
Thanks - a little ice and Advil and I'll be good as new. I just have to make up a story to tell my wife why I'm gimpy or else she'll want me to get rid of the bike!
 

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Thanks - a little ice and Advil and I'll be good as new. I just have to make up a story to tell my wife why I'm gimpy or else she'll want me to get rid of the bike!
Tell her someone left a low file drawer open at work and you caught it rounding a corner on an urgent bathroom run. >:)
 
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Best way to keep the bike is tell her your girlfriend kicked you.....
oh wait, I guess then you and the bike will be homeless....but you'd still have the bike.
I can show you how to properly tie a hammock from the rear wheel to a tree. >:)
 

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Lessee - You were turning right & locked the front wheel still cramped over right so the bike rolled right. You extended your right leg, over compensated the correction, & the whole mess went down to the left. Yeah I can understand that happening with a bike as heavy as an LT. Hope I never have it happen to me that fast. These things happen.

Good luck repairing yourself!
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Lessee - You were turning right & locked the front wheel still cramped over right so the bike rolled right. You extended your right leg, over compensated the correction, & the whole mess went down to the left. Yeah I can understand that happening with a bike as heavy as an LT. Hope I never have it happen to me that fast. These things happen.

Good luck repairing yourself!
No, I was sill in the right turn when I had to suddenly stop. Bike went down to the right after standstill. My mistake was instinctively trying to stop it / ease it down. I never liked the MSF class advise to straighten the bike before you stop in a curve - it can put you in the wrong travel lane. I remember thinking I'll just let it drop in that case. If this bike was 200 lbs. lighter & non-paralever suspension I could have held it & this would have been a non-event.

Best way to keep the bike is tell her your girlfriend kicked you.....
oh wait, I guess then you and the bike will be homeless....but you'd still have the bike.
I can show you how to properly tie a hammock from the rear wheel to a tree. >:)
This brought a good laugh and wins as the most creative excuse - luckily I didn't need to use it! I iced down the thigh all afternoon & took some ibuprofen and by the time I saw my wife last night I could mask my limp so she never noticed. Still icing it today and the pain is not anywhere near as sharp. Riding doesn't bother it - only getting on & off gives me a good twinge.
 

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Jim hope you heal quickly. The one thing that the LT does better than anything is take a dirt nap at the most inappropriate and embarrassing times. I can't tell you how many times I was caught off guard in similar circumstances and forced to make the same braking error, going slow with the bars turned. Shit just happens and most of the time I could catch it but I have dropped it with the wife on board a couple times in seven years and it wasn't fun, but luckily I suffered only a bruised ego and shes wasn't hurt, she is a trooper and still loves to ride.

Good luck with a speedy recovery and keep on riding
 

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Teeter Hangups!

Best purchase you will ever make.
I would still be limping around in pain had I never bought one.

When my riding buddy told me about it, I told him that is the dumbest thing I have ever seen on TV.
After using one for a month, the best investment I have ever made.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Teeter Hang-ups? For real? I can see that working for back pain but for a pulled hamstring? I could see getting one for my wife - she goes regularly to a Chiropractor and spinal disc decompression could help her. Then I could give it a whirl for kicks - it looks like it could be good exercise.

What if I get upside down and can't get back up like that "I've fallen and can't get up" ad on TV? :laugh:
 

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No, I was sill in the right turn when I had to suddenly stop. Bike went down to the right after standstill. My mistake was instinctively trying to stop it / ease it down. I never liked the MSF class advise to straighten the bike before you stop in a curve - it can put you in the wrong travel lane. I remember thinking I'll just let it drop in that case. If this bike was 200 lbs. lighter & non-paralever suspension I could have held it & this would have been a non-event.
.
I agree in a panic stop that centering isn't a very high priority compared to getting the binders on. But not centering does leave things kinda messy when all comes to a halt & may exceed your (our) strength to keep things vertical. I done the same dang thing twice but didn't hurt anything major including the bike.

Just lettergo and step clear,,,,,,,,,,,:laugh:
 

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Since this is a thread about unplanned stops, it seems a good place to post this again so those new LT riders can see what happens if I, i mean you don't follow the simple LT rules of stopping. Head up, bars straight, feet up till you come to a complete stop and then plant your foot/feet.


This will always be at an inopportune moment and or in front of your peers as stated previously.

I will do better this year at the STC.
 

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My last crash completely jacked up my ankle. The doctor was considering cutting.

After a couple of weeks it stretched whatever was wrong in my ankle back into place.

Not to mention the rest of my body felt GREAT!
Ten minutes a day. You will feel much more limber.
If you set up your table properly, all you have to do is put your arms at your sides and you will go horizontal from upside down.
Arms crossed on your chest make you go horizontal from standing, then slowly move your arms over your head.

You will get rid of the chiropractor bill.
The table will pay for itself.

It helps keep you regular, too. -Bonus>:)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Just lettergo and step clear,,,,,,,,,,,:laugh:
Yep, I guess that's the moral of the story. Other than better anticipation and keeping more distance to the car in front of me, nothing else could have been done in this case.

And Mike - I will consider a Teeter Hang-up for general purposes. It looks like they carry them at Dick's Sporting Goods?
 

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Yep, I guess that's the moral of the story. Other than better anticipation and keeping more distance to the car in front of me, nothing else could have been done in this case.

And Mike - I will consider a Teeter Hang-up for general purposes. It looks like they carry them at Dick's Sporting Goods?
I am about to buy a new one from Dick's...
The 400.00 one with adjustable lumbar.

My issue is the hour and a half drive to Canton,GA.
I always have other things to do on the weekends, like ride.
It is nice living in the mountains, but I miss civilization.

My original inversion table was a decent Ironman.
I bought it at a dead people's auction. It was a good table and served its purpose.
I gave it away at Christmas knowing I wanted the Teeter.

Check Craigslist if you live near population.
You can find older ones really cheap if you want to try before you buy.
After a few weeks you will be hooked.


Man did this thread get hijacked.
 

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So on my way to work this morning I am turning right at a traffic light when the car in front of me suddenly stopped to let an ambulance coming the other way by (no lights on). I didn't have time or space to get the bike upright and handlebars straight before I stopped so down she went. ...

The only other time something similar happened was when I was taking an MSF class and practicing an e-stop in a curve. The drill is to brake, and just before stopping straighten out and get the bike upright. Easier said than done...
Jim it looks like you had a couple of issues contributing to the drop.

First, you were following too close to the vehicle in front, and had no reactionary gap to allow a proper stop.

Second, you are incorrect on the MSF procedure. What we brief is to quickly get the bike upright, bars square and THEN apply both brakes fully to stop. In the new material the use of trail braking is introduced so people understand that some braking can be done as you get the bike upright. Again, practice in the skill is important, because it takes a find touch to do it properly.

The reason you dropped your bike both on the BRC Range exercise as well as your bike, is that you were applying the front brake in the turn and it levered the bike over hard as it lost speed.

This is the usual reason people drop big bikes maneuvering in parking lots: They touch the front brake with the bars turned at very low speeds with the resulting crash. Once it levers over you cannot stop it in most instances. Stay off the front brake at low speed with the bars turned. Only apply the front with the bars square front tire straight ahead.

FWIW, I was once riding my okd R1200RR around some very tight radius blind curves at about 20-25 mph and maintaining my lane. On on particularly tight 180 degree left turn, as I am looking through the turn and leaned over about 30 degrees, my eyes behold a huge combine with the harvester knives up about chest high aimed at me ! I did the MSF quick stop in curves which I demonstrate regularly and came to a controlled stop, on the asphalt, and stared hard at the idiot sitting in the road on that thing. He said "I guess I need to move off the road huh? "

Emergency skills we teach work when you need them but have to be practiced regularly because there are volatile skills:

1. Quick stops straight ahead.
2. Quick stops in turns.
3. Emergency swerves.

Might I suggest that you sign up for another BRCII where you can ride your bike and see how it reacts, and then the new Advanced course which will show you what the bike can do at some speed.

Hope you heal up quickly !
 
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Jim it looks like you had a couple of issues contributing to the drop.

First, you were following too close to the vehicle in front, and had no reactionary gap to allow a proper stop.

Second, you are incorrect on the MSF procedure. What we brief is to quickly get the bike upright, bars square and THEN apply both brakes fully to stop. In the new material the use of trail braking is introduced so people understand that some braking can be done as you get the bike upright. Again, practice in the skill is important, because it takes a find touch to do it properly.

The reason you dropped your bike both on the BRC Range exercise as well as your bike, is that you were applying the front brake in the turn and it levered the bike over hard as it lost speed.

This is the usual reason people drop big bikes maneuvering in parking lots: They touch the front brake with the bars turned at very low speeds with the resulting crash. Once it levers over you cannot stop it in most instances. Stay off the front brake at low speed with the bars turned. Only apply the front with the bars square front tire straight ahead.

FWIW, I was once riding my okd R1200RR around some very tight radius blind curves at about 20-25 mph and maintaining my lane. On on particularly tight 180 degree left turn, as I am looking through the turn and leaned over about 30 degrees, my eyes behold a huge combine with the harvester knives up about chest high aimed at me ! I did the MSF quick stop in curves which I demonstrate regularly and came to a controlled stop, on the asphalt, and stared hard at the idiot sitting in the road on that thing. He said "I guess I need to move off the road huh? "

Emergency skills we teach work when you need them but have to be practiced regularly because there are volatile skills:

1. Quick stops straight ahead.
2. Quick stops in turns.
3. Emergency swerves.

Might I suggest that you sign up for another BRCII where you can ride your bike and see how it reacts, and then the new Advanced course which will show you what the bike can do at some speed.

Hope you heal up quickly !

I would agree that these moves would need to be practiced regularly to maintain competency but the LT was not made to stop in any kind of turn. If you find yourself having to stop with any kind of lean, the chances of you going down are extremely high on an LT, especially with the servo assist brakes.

I have been considering signing up for one of these courses but I am not sure my bike wold survive ;) But seriously, after having dropped mine several times in slow maneuvers, I do practice when i get the chance.
 

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I would agree that these moves would need to be practiced regularly to maintain competency but the LT was not made to stop in any kind of turn. If you find yourself having to stop with any kind of lean, the chances of you going down are extremely high on an LT, especially with the servo assist brakes.

I have been considering signing up for one of these courses but I am not sure my bike wold survive ;) But seriously, after having dropped mine several times in slow maneuvers, I do practice when i get the chance.
Actually I have had several LT riders take the BRCII and at least one has been in one of our advanced classes and they had no issues. Agreed that the LT is a big heavy beast, but it can do the maneuvers discussed above. The biggest trick to handling the LT at slow speeds, less than 10 mph or so, is to use the rear brake only unless the bars are square and front tire straight ahead. I road an LT a couple of years ago that was a trade-in at our local dealership, and I most definitely noticed the weight, but it was still manageable. I even took the wife onboard (she loved the rear seating and arm rests!). It was definitely more touchy about low speed maneuvering compared with our RT , but I still did the usual parking lot maneuvers to see how it handled. I still much prefer the RT because I am not a big-cruiser type rider, but much prefer the sport-touring bikes. All said the LT (and the KGT for that matter) are great bikes for touring, but not my kind of ride.
 

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Actually I have had several LT riders take the BRCII and at least one has been in one of our advanced classes and they had no issues. Agreed that the LT is a big heavy beast, but it can do the maneuvers discussed above. The biggest trick to handling the LT at slow speeds, less than 10 mph or so, is to use the rear brake only unless the bars are square and front tire straight ahead. I road an LT a couple of years ago that was a trade-in at our local dealership, and I most definitely noticed the weight, but it was still manageable. I even took the wife onboard (she loved the rear seating and arm rests!). It was definitely more touchy about low speed maneuvering compared with our RT , but I still did the usual parking lot maneuvers to see how it handled. I still much prefer the RT because I am not a big-cruiser type rider, but much prefer the sport-touring bikes. All said the LT (and the KGT for that matter) are great bikes for touring, but not my kind of ride.
I previously had an R1100RT and it was much more forgiving at slow speeds. We all know what not to do and most of the time we are able to navigate just fine and keep the rubber side up. It is those momentary lapses where something unexpected happens and we already have our hand on that front brake and give it a reactionary squeeze where we get into trouble. That is where practice will help. They are amazing bikes above 10mph but care needs to be applied below.

PS. That would be rubber side down as Whisky noted.
 
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