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Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking about buying an ultrasonic parts cleaner. Do they eat rubber parts like "O" rings or plastic parts? I have some airhead carbs that are in desperate need of cleaning. Could be useful for other parts also. Thought I'd ask you guys first.

Robert
 

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I've used them for carb cleaning back in the day and at least then I was told to remove all plastic & rubber parts especially if using the more aggressive settings in the machine.
Worked great, there was a lot of grime in the cleaning solution even though I had previously cleaned them using carb cleaner, brass brush & compressed air.
 

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I'm thinking about buying an ultrasonic parts cleaner. Do they eat rubber parts like "O" rings or plastic parts? I have some airhead carbs that are in desperate need of cleaning. Could be useful for other parts also. Thought I'd ask you guys first.

Robert
It is very unlikely that the ultrasonic waves will damage rubber or plastic parts. The main issue is choice of cleaning solution.

I have read of damage to soft polished metals such as aluminum where localized cavitation due to standing waves can erode the surface.

https://omegasonics.com/ultrasonic-cleaners.shtml
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks, Matt. I found a TruSonik 5L unit on Amazon for $130. I was planning on using a dilute mixture of simple green with some vinegar.

Robert
 

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Quess I should've mentioned that the one I used was a big industrial one at my former company. It was used to clean the nozzles of an epoxy dispenser so it's a bit more aggressive than the small commercial ones. Canät remember what the cleaning solution was but I'm pretty sure that was pretty potent stuff too.
 

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Quess I should've mentioned that the one I used was a big industrial one at my former company. It was used to clean the nozzles of an epoxy dispenser so it's a bit more aggressive than the small commercial ones. Canät remember what the cleaning solution was but I'm pretty sure that was pretty potent stuff too.
Certainly the cavitation caused by the ultrasonic waves has the potential to cause mechanical damage, everything I've read about ultrasonics suggests that the pH and any abrasives in the solution are the dominant factors. If your solution is compatible with the materials to be cleaned, then I suspect you are 99% likely to be OK.
 
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