BMW Luxury Touring Community banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have been busy riding, working, sleeping, repeat. The new clutch and Wilbers have been a delight and now I am wondering how well does this bike handle the popup trailers like a Bunkhouse or similar? Anyone out there using a camper and do you have advise for hauling one. I've never pulled more than a small trailer that didn't need brakes, and I'm curious if electric brakes are useful and safe. The wife would like to try motorcycle camping, but insists she is getting to old to sleep on the ground, well maybe we both are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,514 Posts
I have towed this for the best part of 100.000 km. The hardest part is getting the trailer rolling at very low rpm then throttle up. if you ride the clutch to take off you will burn it out in no time.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,300 Posts
This is my new (to me) Bunkhouse Queen. It does not have brakes but has not been a problem. I also have a Bunkhouse LX that I have well over 50,000 miles on it. Most of the miles were with a K1100LT. I have about 18,000 miles on it being pulled with my K1200LT. This one has electric brakes (not hydro electric) and I have worn out the magnets and had to replace the backing plates (7" diameter available at Northern Tool). I just recently had a transmission failure but I have not torn it down yet to certain the cause.

Robert
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I have towed this for the best part of 100.000 km. The hardest part is getting the trailer rolling at very low rpm then throttle up. if you ride the clutch to take off you will burn it out in no time.
I hear that! I am in know hurry to do another clutch job. Things can get very hilly in Wisconsin (Driftless Area). What would you suggest for a maximum weight to tow?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
58 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
This is my new (to me) Bunkhouse Queen. It does not have brakes but has not been a problem. I also have a Bunkhouse LX that I have well over 50,000 miles on it. Most of the miles were with a K1100LT. I have about 18,000 miles on it being pulled with my K1200LT. This one has electric brakes (not hydro electric) and I have worn out the magnets and had to replace the backing plates (7" diameter available at Northern Tool). I just recently had a transmission failure but I have not torn it down yet to certain the cause.

Robert
I have been eyeing an Aspen Classic that is 10 yo and $2500.00. The fellow is unable to ride his GWing or even camp, so he is selling everything. I think the Bunkhouse is about the same size and weight so by your account, I should have no trouble towing the Classic. Maybe I should take a look at this camper.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,622 Posts
I have been busy riding, working, sleeping, repeat. The new clutch and Wilbers have been a delight and now I am wondering how well does this bike handle the popup trailers like a Bunkhouse or similar? Anyone out there using a camper and do you have advise for hauling one. I've never pulled more than a small trailer that didn't need brakes, and I'm curious if electric brakes are useful and safe. The wife would like to try motorcycle camping, but insists she is getting to old to sleep on the ground, well maybe we both are.
I am not a fan of towing with a motorcycle or of Gold Wings, but if I was going to tow a camper with a motorcycle I would buy a Gold Wing and reserve the LT for rides not involving the trailer.

Why? Several reasons:
1. The LT's dry clutch won't take abuse like the Wing's wet clutch. Towing a camper will abuse the clutch, particularly if you tow in other than flat country.
2. The LT is geared too tall in 1st for the motorcycle itself. Adding load makes a bad situation worse.
3. Towing favors torque and displacement over horsepower and RPM. The Wing engine is one step removed from that in a John Deere. It is suited to towing.

Just as most four wheeled vehicle drivers tow their campers with a truck or SUV rather than a Porsche, motorcyclists should tow with a Wing, not an LT.
 

·
Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
Joined
·
14,245 Posts
FWIW 350 lbs gross is my personal limit to tow with the LT. I did have full hard brake stop from 65 and she tracked straight and true and I missed the deer. Never noticed the trailer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
847 Posts
I am not a fan of towing with a motorcycle or of Gold Wings, but if I was going to tow a camper with a motorcycle I would buy a Gold Wing and reserve the LT for rides not involving the trailer.

Why? Several reasons:
1. The LT's dry clutch won't take abuse like the Wing's wet clutch. Towing a camper will abuse the clutch, particularly if you tow in other than flat country.
2. The LT is geared too tall in 1st for the motorcycle itself. Adding load makes a bad situation worse.
3. Towing favors torque and displacement over horsepower and RPM. The Wing engine is one step removed from that in a John Deere. It is suited to towing.

Just as most four wheeled vehicle drivers tow their campers with a truck or SUV rather than a Porsche, motorcyclists should tow with a Wing, not an LT.
I would not tow with the LT you mess up the clutch and I think you mess up the bearing on the tranny by towing
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,276 Posts
Although a while ago, I towed a fully loaded KwiK Kamp pop up, 2 up, from Florida to Oregon with my '99 LT back in 2000. The total round trip was over 6000 miles. Also towed that trailer probably an additional 25 or 30K miles with that same bike. As an MSF Instructor that '99 also spent many hours as my demo bike while teaching the Experienced Rider Course which was full of slow tight turn exercises using "friction zone" techniques. I traded that bike at 98,000 miles on an '05 and it was still running with the original clutch. So my take is that unless you really try hard to abuse the clutch, or have a slave cylinder leak the LT clutch should not be an issue.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Axle and alabrew

·
Registered
Joined
·
170 Posts
uh for the cost of the trailer and the cost and time to do a clutch - I would enjoy riding like a free bird with out the trailer and stop in motels on the way - need to grab a shower and put my feet up and rest my sorry old butt
figured that out with my class A motorhome - maintenance and fuel (diesel) camp fees insurance and all the other related cost of running the monster it was cheaper faster to fly and stay in a nice hotel with a pool and food services - don;t get me wrong loved it for many many years. Now when we travel long distances and want he bike, i throw the bike in a trailer tow it to the destination and then ride the bike around. Saves being soaked or cooked while riding to and from the destination
but that's my opinion
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,622 Posts
uh for the cost of the trailer and the cost and time to do a clutch - I would enjoy riding like a free bird with out the trailer and stop in motels on the way - need to grab a shower and put my feet up and rest my sorry old butt
figured that out with my class A motorhome - maintenance and fuel (diesel) camp fees insurance and all the other related cost of running the monster it was cheaper faster to fly and stay in a nice hotel with a pool and food services - don;t get me wrong loved it for many many years. Now when we travel long distances and want he bike, i throw the bike in a trailer tow it to the destination and then ride the bike around. Saves being soaked or cooked while riding to and from the destination
but that's my opinion
That is my calculus also. My wife and I like camping and do that quite often, but we also like traveling and tend to keep the two separate. For the number of days we get to travel each year, it is both more convenient and less expensive to stay at hotels. We generally can find decent hotels for around $80/night and this includes an adequate breakfast. Most campgrounds now are $20 a night or more and many closer to $40. Add in the cost of breakfast, extra fuel to tow the trailer and you might save $40/day over a hotel. We are lucky to get 21 days on the road, so a camper might save me $900 a year. And camping requires at least an extra hour a day for set up and tear down and the inconvenience of towing the camper. For me, hotels and motels just make more sense all the way around when traveling and we get several weeks of camping in also.

However, I realize that many just like to camp and, particularly if you have no other camping outlet, I can understand combining camping with traveling.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top