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Old Slow Guy in A Fast Car
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Discussion Starter #1
Some one on another forum asked about towing the K1600 so I posted this info.

When using "New" straps check them after about 50 miles as they can stretch some at first. If towing long distance check the straps at every stop (gas, food etc).

When using a chock always tie the bike "Forward" into the chock.

I ALWAYS use "Soft tie straps" By Ancra. I get them online.



Next put soft tie around fork above the front fender. (Threw the hole)



It will look like this.



On the rear go around the "Square tubing behind the rear foot peg.



Pull that strap to the front also.

 

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The photos above clearly illustrate use of the tiedown points shown in the owners manual and work well. It's a good idea to place soft toweling between the straps and the frame to prevent marking the frame, especially if towing for long distance. For safety, the sidestand and center stand should not be deployed during towing.
 

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Old Slow Guy in A Fast Car
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Discussion Starter #4
lenny said:
when I brought mine home i used the engine guards and the pass. foot pegs
Those are two of the weakest points to tie down a bike. The Engine guards are made to take the force of a drop pushing the guard INTO the engine. NOT pulling down on the guard. That can pull a bolt from the motor. The foot peg support is cast aluminum & can brake from the force of the bike bouncing up & down. Believe me I've towed over 2000 bikes in the last 3 years with only 1 incident & that was a bad strap that let go.
 

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Wow that bike looks dirty and lots of bugs. The first step before tying down would include a through wash job. I can't imagine any other way. Just kidding guys, any one who knows me would understand . :histerica
 

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Old Slow Guy in A Fast Car
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Discussion Starter #7
clayton said:
Wow that bike looks dirty and lots of bugs. The first step before tying down would include a through wash job. I can't imagine any other way. Just kidding guys, any one who knows me would understand . :histerica
Hey !! I use those bugs for both a Science & Math project for my Grand kids. The have to tell me what kind of bug it is & how fast I was going when I hit it. :histerica
 

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towing a K1600 GTL is.. umm .. just... wrong... lol .. but if really had to do it, would be in an enclosed trailer.. damn, i didnt say trailer now, did i ??.. lol .. sakes


Hbar




the best antiques are old friends
 

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My wife and I go camping with a toy hauler. We will sometimes take our bike with us. I don't like using the side stand, but the floor in the toy hauler allows the bike to move during towing, no matter how tight the tie down straps are. So, I have resorted to tying the bike down with the side stand down. I try and keep the pressure off the side stand, but now the bike can move without the fear of it sliding and falling over.

We are about to go to Tucson with the bike in the trailer. This is a bad time of year to try and ride out of and back into the Salt Lake corridor.
 

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Just picked mine up yesterday in S. Louis. Believe me I trailerd it in an enclosed trailer. I also bought a wheel chock from harbor freight. $50.00 with the 20% discount. Great little chock. I liked the wide stance of it. 250 miles later I am home. ;-)
 

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Had to call Roadside Assistance to have my GTL towed on a flatbed. The driver knew what he was doing, did soft ties at the factory-specified locations with rags underneath to protect the finish and used a front-wheel chock. The interesting thing he did was take a tie around the rear wheel. Started at one side, went over the rim, under the tire, then over the rim again to the other side, then cinched it down. His explanation was that it would keep the rear wheel from sliding side to side. So: chock in front, rear wheel secure laterally, and straps keeping it from moving fore and aft. No need to put the sidestand down and risk damaging it (or worse) by having the bike bouncing against it.
 

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Old Slow Guy in A Fast Car
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Discussion Starter #13
Had to call Roadside Assistance to have my GTL towed on a flatbed. The driver knew what he was doing, did soft ties at the factory-specified locations with rags underneath to protect the finish and used a front-wheel chock. The interesting thing he did was take a tie around the rear wheel. Started at one side, went over the rim, under the tire, then over the rim again to the other side, then cinched it down. His explanation was that it would keep the rear wheel from sliding side to side. So: chock in front, rear wheel secure laterally, and straps keeping it from moving fore and aft. No need to put the sidestand down and risk damaging it (or worse) by having the bike bouncing against it.
It is nice when you get a driver who knows what he is doing. I've seen so many bikes damaged by "Buba" on a flatbed because he did not have a clue how to strap the bike down.
 

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Just ordered an enclosed trailer for hauling my bike around. I was thinking of getting one of those "smart chocks" which will be mounted to the trailer. Would you recommend just strapping the front wheel into the chock only, or the usual way and tie the front end down to the trailer hooks? And if course tie down the rear...
 

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It is nice when you get a driver who knows what he is doing. I've seen so many bikes damaged by "Buba" on a flatbed because he did not have a clue how to strap the bike down.
Worked a car vs motorcycle once where the wrecker driver used an old dual strap sling and slid it under the bike, then just hooked the bar with the cable and let the bike flop around as needed. Ouch.
 

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Old Slow Guy in A Fast Car
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Discussion Starter #16
Just ordered an enclosed trailer for hauling my bike around. I was thinking of getting one of those "smart chocks" which will be mounted to the trailer. Would you recommend just strapping the front wheel into the chock only, or the usual way and tie the front end down to the trailer hooks? And if course tie down the rear...
ALWAYS use 4 straps on the bike. When I first started towing bikes the manufacturer of the trailer I use said "Only 2 straps are needed to hold the bike" so that is what I did till 1 strap failed & it cost me $2000 to fix the bike. That was the one and only time I have had any bike damage. I always use 4 straps now.
Get a wheel Chock & strap the bike like the pictures in this thread. You will never have any trouble. Also remember to check the straps at every stop & if the bike is left strapped over night check them before moving as they will get loose.
 

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What about traveling on a ferry. No front wheel chuck there. And the deck is made of steel. Will the 4 strap work.
 

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What about traveling on a ferry. No front wheel chuck there. And the deck is made of steel. Will the 4 strap work.
Yes, worked fine when I went to Newfoundland last summer. Just don't have the straps perpendicular to the bike. Pick anchors in front of and behind the bike if possible. This keeps the bike from rolling back and forth. Next best is to use a single deck anchor midship the bike. The straps should be such that they are putting the bike in tension as in the first case, or compression as in the second case. A top town view of the straps should look like an "X" in the first (ideal) case or a diamond in the second case. If they look like an "H" from the top, that is bad.

You can see this somewhat in the attached picture. Yes, I ride an LT not a GTL, and, no, I don't ride in shorts, but they are nice under the riding pants so I can be comfortable in the rather warm bowels of the ferry. :)
 

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Yes, worked fine when I went to Newfoundland last summer. Just don't have the straps perpendicular to the bike. Pick anchors in front of and behind the bike if possible. This keeps the bike from rolling back and forth. Next best is to use a single deck anchor midship the bike. The straps should be such that they are putting the bike in tension as in the first case, or compression as in the second case. A top town view of the straps should look like an "X" in the first (ideal) case or a diamond in the second case. If they look like an "H" from the top, that is bad.

You can see this somewhat in the attached picture. Yes, I ride an LT not a GTL, and, no, I don't ride in shorts, but they are nice under the riding pants so I can be comfortable in the rather warm bowels of the ferry. :)
Looks like your bike is on its side stand correct?

Thanks for posting.
 

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Looks like your bike is on its side stand correct?

Thanks for posting.
Yes, I wanted the suspension to be able to work, but boats really don't move that hard unless they crash into the dock.

I tightened the side stand side straps barely snug, then ratcheted the opposite side to compress the suspension and largely unload the side stand. Worked fine for both of the 6 hour boat rides.
 
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