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Discussion Starter #1
Finishing work on my trailer and am wanting to travel some this summer. What tools and things would you recommend carrying?

Thanks
Bryan
 

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To me the basic tool kit is good enough. I suppose you can pack one of everything that might break along the way, but if you are that paranoid, just take the train and call it a day. Pack some clean undies and the credit card and go ride. Leave the rest at home including your worries. That is the whole point of traveling by motorcycle anyway.
 

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I'm assuming you're asking about tools to keep in the trailer and not a tool roll to carry on the bike.
I have purchased a few of these Crescent Tool Sets. They are good quality and have a great selection of tools in a handy case. Amazon had them on sale about a month ago for $79. I have them in all my cars and my boat.
 

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Finishing work on my trailer and am wanting to travel some this summer. What tools and things would you recommend carrying?

Thanks
Bryan
Ask yourself what you want to be able to fix.

I want to be able to remove both wheels so I carry a 1/2" drive breaker bar and socket to fit the rear lug bolts. I haven't memorized the sizes so you will have to check those. Likewise for the front so you need appropriate tools to remove the fender, calipers, pinch bolts and axle nut (going on memory here).

I want to be able to remove the body work so I carry a multi bit screwdriver and full complement of bits for Philips and Torx.

I actually carry a full set of 3/8" drive sockets, Torx and hex bits as well as pliers of various styles, vice grips, etc. However, if you want a minimalist set, I suggest first deciding which maintenance and repair operations you wish to be capable of doing and then carry just the tools needed for those jobs.

The most useful tools are a cell phone and a credit card. :grin:
 

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Vise grips double as an emergency foot peg if you dump the bike and break it off. I have loaned my pair out twice so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Leaving the train and worries behind:)) First time ever traveling by bike. I love the cell phone and CC along with AAA being the best. Thanks Guys
 

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The most useful tools are a cell phone and a credit card. :grin:
Couldn't agree more! I would add the MOA "anonymous book". You have the cell phone, but, who are
you gonna call? Better yet, enlist your number there. You never know when your best friend ever will
give you a call ...:wink:
 

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Couldn't agree more! I would add the MOA "anonymous book". You have the cell phone, but, who are
you gonna call? Better yet, enlist your number there. You never know when your best friend ever will
give you a call ...:wink:
Yes, I always carry that also and I am listed in it. :grin:

I also have the Platinum plan through BMWMOA. I nearly used it in Oregon when I ran out of gas. I did not find any Anonymous members near Madras as I recall. A friendly trucker gave us a ride the 12 miles into Madras and I was able to borrow a gas jug and get a ride back to my LT with the off-duty hotel manager who happened to stop by at the right time. Otherwise, I would have given the Platinum road service a good test!

I still carry tools as I am the self-reliant type who prefers to solve my own problems when possible. However, it is prudent to have a few rings of defense hence the cell phone, CC, Anonymous book and Platinum plan - whose price increased greatly at my last renewal. I bought the five-year plan back in 2013 and when I renewed this year, I think two-years is the longest offered and the cost nearly equaled what I paid last time for five years! May have to look at other road service plans next renewal cycle.
 

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I carry a Cruz Tools tool kit for Beemers, and supplemented it with a pair of extra long needle nose pliers and a pick kit, which were necessary to put my LT's shifter back together after it fell apart outside of Indianapolis. I also had some spare parts for the shifter with me which helped. A pair of vise grips can also be used as an on-the-fly shifter for some bikes (had the shifter fall off somewhere outside of Colorado Springs on my Suzuki Water Buffalo years ago). Credit cards, a AAA card with the RV coverage option, and the MOA Anonymous book are also helpful. :bmw:
 

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I don't think they will provide services for a motorcycle. I dropped AAA about 35 years ago because they told me its an Automobile Association not motorcycle assoc. If that changed let me know.
 

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I have the basic tool roll along with a tool for adjusting the spring preload. My bike (a 2000) has Wilburs shocks and springs front and rear so I am not sure of that tool is stock. Last week while coming home to Oregon after completing an IBA CC50 ride ( Coast to Coast in less than 50 hours, My fuel pump died in Arizona. I was able to change the pump with the stock tool set.
 

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You really can't do much on the road. At the motel, you can go to the hardware store and get what you need for tools or have it towed to the shop. Can you use the tools to accomplish anything???? Are you a mechanic? Do you have a GS-911 to tell you the story on more complicated issues? Have you lined up a dealer that will ship you parts over night with a phone call?
Take your flat repair hardware (including a small pump) and a volt meter if you know how to use it. Other wise, go riding and don't worry. A flat tire will probably be the worst if you keep your bike in good shape. There are people that carry spare final drive units for the older bikes. Put my thumb on a rock and hit it with a hammer. If the bike is that scary, I would not leave town on it. The most I do, is to carry a 60mm left side final drive seal for the new generation drives. And that is a waste of time since we have gone to 180 ml of oil back there. Even Porsche has given up on spare tires, just a flat fix it kit in my last one. And that is for the AAA guy to use. Unless your ready to get dirty and take part in the obsession we all have, machines. Preemptive maintenance is your friend. Stuff gets old. Things need maintenance and it is not all on the annual list from BMW. Did you replace the front wheel bearings at 75k miles? How are your rear final drive pivot bearings? Retorque the adjustable journal for the rear swing arm every two years to 9Nm? Go on that dream trip on a three year old battery, you would be surprised at what the heat in the SW will do to it? The list is a book long, right down to removing your center stand and greasing everything every two years.
 
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What will AAA do for you on a motorcycle tour besides 10% off motels?
I've been a member for years. My AAA motorcycle coverage includes 100 miles towing, free fuel delivery, and more. The first time I took my LT on an overnighter, I ran out of gas after getting on the freeway (I misread the fuel and temp gauges and thought I had a half a tank and intended to fill it up in another 30 miles). Although I'm also a member of the MOA, I don't buy their motorcycle towing option.:bmw:
 

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Did anyone have a motorcycle towed by AAA? I dropped AAA years ago because my local office told me no services for motorcycles. Has this policy changed?
 

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You have to get "AAA Plus", that extends it to RV and motorcycles. And I once got a $450 tow on a flatbed truck for my motorcycle. Another time gasoline delivered when I got stupid. Their maps are good also.
 
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