BMW Luxury Touring Community banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello all. As stated in a previous post, I am new to my LT and am loving every minute of it. Except for that little bit about getting caught in the rain and the windshield dumping it down my neck. Ah well...on to the topic at hand.

I am constituting a tool kit, and am hunting for advice on tools I need or things I can do without. Attached are some pics and a list of tools in it. I don't have a tire repair kit listed, because I am working on placing an air compressor and such. Also working on spare wire and other electrical stuff.

replacement tire valve
robo wrenches - 3/4,5/8,9/16,11/16
18,17,15,14
1/2,7/16,5/16,3/8
13,12,11,10
5-in-1 screwdriver
6" adjustable wrench
break off razor
razor
Gerber needlenose multitool
sharpie
ballpoint pen
circuit tester
lighter
blue loctite
electrical tape
zip ties
mini maglite
extra set of batteries
alligator patch cables
mini-ATC fuses
BMW fuse tool
assorted wire nuts, screws, and washers
hose clamps
3/8" ratchet
2", 4" 3/8" extensions
5/8 spark plug socket
sockets - 17,15,14,13,12,11,10,9
hex sockets - 8,7,6,5,4,3
torx sockets - 47,45,40,30,27,25,20,15,10
paper clip

I'm not sure about the robowrenches, thinking about replacing them with regular open end ones. Otherwise, I'm not married to anything in the kit. Except for the paper clip. Those things keep on coming in handy.

Anyway, happy holidays and keep the egg nog flowing.

Cheers,
 

Attachments

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
Being new to LT-land myself, I'm not sure of what to suggest except for one thing: some paper or something else to write on instead of your hand (you already had a ballpoint pen listed).

I keep some PostIt Note paper in my "go bag." One never knows. . .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,900 Posts
If you have the "correct" Bosch/BMW spark plugs you can drop the 5/8 plug socket, they are 18mm.
A must have would be a tire repair kit and compressor. And another "must have" would be a cell phone with a fully charged battery.
 

·
Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
Joined
·
13,940 Posts
I say loose the 5/8 spark plug socket as these are 11/16 plugs and I have not seen a spark plug specific in that size yet. No need for SAE (except the plugs) everything is metric and torx. I don't think a replacement tire valve will help unless you have access to a tire machine - bead is pretty tough to break with out one. Replace the rubber tire valves at your first opportunity with metal ones.

After you have done a couple of maintenance intervals 12K and 24K you'll know what to carry to get to most everything.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for everyone pointing out that the plugs are 11/16th. I was trying to figure out the correct size, but couldn't seem to find the info.

For tire repairs, I am working on placement for a compressor (got one that came with a Slime kit, and like it a lot after I stripped it down), as well as deciding on a patch kit or a Stop N Go kit.

As jzeiler pointed out, after I do a few services I'll really figure out what I need and don't need. I want the dealer to do my 12,000 service (I've got a touch over 9k right now), as I want them to do the valve clearance check before I touch them. That is because of two things: 1) I'm not sure of how deep the inspection of the bike was before I got it (it's an 8 month used one), and 2) I want to have someone walk me through one before I attempt to do it.

Oh, someone pointed out to lose the SAE stuff. I normally would, but the way the Husky RoboWrenches are set up each one covers 4-5 different sizes, sometimes both SAE and metric. But again, I'm seriously thinking about trading them out for a open end set.

Oh, and the replacement valve stem is actually a valve core. It came with the Slime kit, and just kept it...because. Yeah, I can see breaking the bead being an issue.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,424 Posts
No we mean valve stem not valve core. Read here, here, here and here from the old site, just to point out a few. YMMV DAMHIK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,905 Posts
I think the best advise I have ever received regarding a bike's toolkit was given by Don Arthur. (If you don't know the name, well, I don't know what to tell ya. :)) To paraphrase, he said that he doesn't take any tool with him on the road that he doesn't use while working on a bike in his garage. This is the best way to ensure that the tools you're taking are the ones you need. It's also a great way to hone down the amount of tools you take with you. The more I tour long distances, the smaller my toolkit is getting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,208 Posts
Bead breaker

Something I learned a long time ago from an old Harley rider,
the side stand can be used as an emergency bead breaker,
a little trickier with the wheel of but even with the bike on the centerstand it can be done.
Once the wheel is positioned under the side stand,
a pull of the bike to the left from the right side handlebar grip does the trick
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
After reading this thread, and seeing all the goodies some folks pack for enroute repairs, I have to once again show my newbie-ness and ask: Where do you keep clothing etc for you and your traveling companion? Do you ship it to the destination in advance, or are you just really good at packing?

I know that some folks have a small trailer that they pull behind the bike, but what about those without?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
84 Posts
Packing tools.

I leave it to ya'all to say how much and many, but less is better, if you have the skill and knowledge. All the tools at Sears won't help if you don't know what they are for or how your equipment functions.

It looks like the tool box and tupperware takes up a lot of room........ I put my tools in a cheap tolit kit bag [$4.00] It packs down and the stuff doesn't rattle around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
Morley said:
If you have the "correct" Bosch/BMW spark plugs you can drop the 5/8 plug socket, they are 18mm.
A must have would be a tire repair kit and compressor. And another "must have" would be a cell phone with a fully charged battery.
DITTO, Frankly, there is so much stuff to take off the bike to get to much of it, that IMHO anything other than extremely small road side repairs are not really feasible. A fully charged cell phone in addition to a small compressor and a tire plugger kit (forget the BMW stock one) are your most important items. Don't for get the pliers to pull the nail out of the tire.

AND chances are if you have significant problems while on the road not only is the above true, but most of us would not be able technically to handle it anyway.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
449 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
One of my goals with the tool kit is to minimize the impact on storage. Using the plastic case, I'm hoping to be able to squeeze a saddlebag liner on top of it in a side pannier. Unfortunately, the more space I have, the more things I have to fill them.

Cheers,
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
browad said:
Unfortunately, the more space I have, the more things I have
to fill them.Cheers,
You just recalled a very basic scientific principle appropriately named after its discoverer, Fred Sanford's Law, which states:

"All other things being equal, junk expands to fill all available space."

(Anyone who saw my garage would instantly accept this law as true. Hey, you never know if you might need that box and packing material for the computer you've since replaced three times ago!) :rotf:


... and let's not forget the Workplace Corollary, which states that "work expands to fill the available time."
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,561 Posts
Whenever I work on my LT or RT, I use the on board tool kits, that helps assure I have the tools I need in them.........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,316 Posts
One thing you do not have on your list is cash. I keep $50 or $60 dollars on the bike at all times.
 

·
Registered
1999 LTC
Joined
·
14,456 Posts
kaskas said:
It looks like the tool box and tupperware takes up a lot of room........ I put my tools in a cheap tolit kit bag [$4.00] It packs down and the stuff doesn't rattle around.
I didn't like the tool kit roll that came with ole Toad - it wouldn't stay adhered to the sidecase wall - so I put 'em all on the floor of the sidecase. Takes up 'bout 1/2 an inch of space, butt I use Beemer Bags for liners and they conform to whatever space/shape you stuff 'em into. See pix below.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,752 Posts
Dick said:
I didn't like the tool kit roll that came with ole Toad - it wouldn't stay adhered to the sidecase wall - so I put 'em all on the floor of the sidecase. Takes up 'bout 1/2 an inch of space, butt I use Beemer Bags for liners and they conform to whatever space/shape you stuff 'em into. See pix below.
Hey Dick! I forgot you had the clever way of storing them... My tool roll wouldn't stay attached either, so it and the other tools are in a carry bag from some motivational class I had to go to at work (at least something good came from it!)

So where did you get that foam? Anything special?
 

·
Registered
1999 LTC
Joined
·
14,456 Posts
gulfxray said:
Hey Dick! I forgot you had the clever way of storing them... My tool roll wouldn't stay attached either, so it and the other tools are in a carry bag from some motivational class I had to go to at work (at least something good came from it!)

So where did you get that foam? Anything special?
Hi, Shawn - Happy New Year to you and Terri and the family all.

Got the foam padding at Sears. Its for lining tool trays and tool chest drawers. Comes in a beeg package, with a nifty leetle knife, and a white sheet of paper to use to outline the various tools. I laid out all the tools on the white sheet; made the outlines and then laid that over the foam pad. Did the knife cutouts, shucked the pieces, and then inserted the tools in their respective cavity.

One thang - the floor of the sidecases is not on a level plane; has a slight belly to it. So, I used a thin piece of rubbermaid material for the bottom - then the cutout pad; insert the tools; then another layer of rubbermaid on top as a lid. This enables the whole shebang to conform to the sway belly of the sidecase.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
807 Posts
messenger13 said:
I think the best advise I have ever received regarding a bike's toolkit was given by Don Arthur. (If you don't know the name, well, I don't know what to tell ya. :)) .... It's also a great way to hone down the amount of tools you take with you. The more I tour long distances, the smaller my toolkit is getting.
Like Joe said, in the last 22,000+ miles, I have not opened the tool kit in my bike. May that always be the case.
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top