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Discussion Starter #1
Well, in 10 months of ownership and about 12K miles, the OEM Metzlers will need to be replaced some time soon and I want to go to another brand anyway. My question is this: Do I go by the owners manual for air pressure, or what is stamped on the new tire as max pressure minus a pound or 3 to suit my riding style? I'm kind of partial to Michelins--

Thanks in advance for the input,
Dave
 

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42F & 48R is most commonly used to maximize tire life. Make sure your new ones are rated high enough for the LT weight. Not too many choices out there.
 

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A couple of possible points, first the OP is talking RT not LT, and he lives in a very hot area with impressively hot tarmac temperatures. Starting out at max or almost max pressure will get you into some seriously high pressure on a hot day. I suggest you move up (if you must) from stock recommended pressure carefully. Those hard tires show a smaller contact patch if that matters to you. There is a calculated pressure formula out there based on starting out pressure verses pressure at riding temp and how much the increase is. Something about the correct pressure is the one that lets the riding temp pressure increase a certain percent? I can't remember. I suspect it is based on soft tires heat up too much. Hard tires in the wet or twisties are not optimum. And there is always the thought that the factory engineers gave it some thought as to what works with the bike in general. :wave
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Beech, you are correct--it gets as hot as hell down here: Mesquite, Nevada on the way back from a trip last year it was an indicated 117f!! In the summer, warm months, I always drop the pressures---I have seen a 34 psi rear turn into a 44psi tire--the ambient temps that day were hovering in the low 100's. I use an Accu Gage (recommended roundly on this forum) so I trust the readings are accurate. All of us here in the desert have had issues with tires because of heat, in cars and trucks as well. If in the warm months I am crossing Death Valley, even early in the morning, the temps can easily touch 100 plus while on the way to the California mountains. I dumped pressures twice on that trip. It would be nice to come up with a "start up formula" that is good for the entire day. And, a rear wheel with an easier to get to valve stem!! Going to a "right angle" stem with the tire change.
Thanks again,
Dave
 

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Not that I have the only correct answer, butt here is my 2c worth... my RT is well ridden; rallies can be very long and tires kept in motion for very long periods of time - I love NV and UT and have ridden 10s of 1000s in them.

How much do you weigh and what do you carry? I am about 160# and had my Wilbers set up correctly after I took off the bags and their contents and weighed everything including my riding gear - >100# including weight of the bags. I run 40-42# in the rear and 38-39# in the front. My tire of choice has been the Michlene Pilot Road 2s.

This summer I will probably go to the B rated rear because of the extra weight that I will be carrying with my 12yo son. He wants to start riding LD with me!! I don't see why the new PR 3s won't be good but I haven't purchased them or tried them yet. No one I know has reported on their mileage. I usually get 12K miles from the PR 2s and that usually includes a lot of high speed slab miles that wear the middle down. YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
HI Peter----
Thanks for your response. In my "younger days" I had multiple "thousand in one" pins and certificates. I fully understand the lure of the long distance ride and as myself managed to put 206,000 miles on the RT in my icon picture over 22 years.

I weigh 185 pounds, carry about 30 lbs of weight for clothes, cameras, etc. I am glad to hear you enjoy UT and NV; most people miss the point. In any event, I am also prone to the Road Pilots. More interested in grip than mileage. I simply would like a tire I can depend on, check the pressure in the morning, and not have to adjust it through out the day. Matter of fact, tomorrow I'm headed off to Lake Havasu City to check out London Bridge and the surrounding area. Hey, it's a ride. I think based on empirical data from my own experience it will be the Road Pilots. I will try your TP's and see how they work for me.
Thanks,
Dave
 
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