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My '99 lt crossed over 100,000 last season and after riding 1600 mi this spring I am confronted w/ the following. The problem of cutting out below 2000 rpm is getting worse. The dealer can't won't acknowledge, has the attitude "ya don't need to be below 2000 anyway on this bike". The shocks need replacing. Have had asstd dealers replace rear seals, clutch, brake pads, etc while on the road and am about fed up, between the prices and attitude. Many years ago I did all the maintenance, some light rebuilding, etc., and now am considering the complexities of maintaining a BMW LT...
Would like any help trouble shooting the stumbling below 2000, (the local wrench, said he doesn't have the proper manuals or tools to diagnos and work on it, but that it seemed to be one cyl cutting out) and what if any special tools required to repair. I don't have any exp. with fuel injection, electronics, etc. Shocks don't seemto be a big deal, if I get a manual, and learn how to strip the plastic.... aaammm, maybe I should buy something else. I like the bike, but I push it pretty hard, staying in front of Gold wings and 1200rt's, thanks, J.
 

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jbwbhs said:
The problem of cutting out below 2000 rpm is getting worse.
Hey J.

I'd start with the basics, like spark plug wires. Pull them one at a time and see what happens. Or, you could just measure resistance if you don't want the excitement. I'd also look for a vacuum leak: be sure the boots are seated and clamped good to the fuel rail. Also, be sure the small vacuum hoses from the rollover valve aren't leaking. I'd do that by taking them off and plugging them at the rail.



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If someone said it could be just one cylinder, you can do the old "spit on the header pipes" trick to determine which one may be misfiring/cutting out.

Here's how:
Run the engine in the RPM range at which it runs worst, hit the kill switch and and then pull over in a safe place. Put a large amount of spit on your fingertips and VERY quickly, almost slap, each header pipe - repentishing the spit after each swipe! The one that is misfiring will be a little colder than the rest. Normal running cylinders will absolutely sizzle the spit right off. MAKE SURE YOU USE A LOT OF SPIT to prevent burns. Reply back here if you find one colder than the rest.
 

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Man! That Pastor sure does like to spit on stuff, doesn't he?! :D
But I digress...

I know that the "Flying Brick" is more than capable of running for miles and miles and miles, but sometimes you have to know when to cry "Uncle!". If I had a bike for 100,000 miles and it started naggin' at me too too much, I'd have to put it out to pasture. But, that's just me. You have to do what YOU have to do.

(FWIW, the spit test is a good place to start here. It's crude, but it works. ;))
 

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Carbon ?

Might be time to pull the head and de-carbonize the cylinders...


That'll cause mis-firing and such at lower rpm's

Or you could try a commercial de-carbonizer..That you run through the injection..

Just thinking out loud here... Everyone else has covered the basic stuff..

Good Luck

John
 

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cccpastorjack said:
. Put a large amount of spit on your fingertips and VERY quickly, almost slap, each header pipe
Jack, I learnt from my aircraft mechanic son that WD-40 is a far more hygienic and high tech way to go. Also you can get more distance with the little red tube than spitting and you can keep your fingerprints :D
 

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blouw said:
Also you can get more distance with the little red tube than spitting and you can keep your fingerprints :D
Maybe he doesn't want to keep his fingerprints. :cool:
 

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I know that the "Flying Brick" is more than capable of running for miles and miles and miles, but sometimes you have to know when to cry "Uncle!". If I had a bike for 100,000 miles and it started naggin' at me too too much, I'd have to put it out to pasture. But, that's just me. You have to do what YOU have to do.
If you want to replace the engine, I've got a good running one out of a '00 LT-C that we could work a deal on. PM if interested in exploring this.
 
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