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Discussion Starter #1
Yesterday I started the bike,(99LT, 69000 km) parked it outside while I cleaned the garage, and parked it back inside.
When I went to the garage this morning, there was a strange clicking coming from the LT, before I raised the seat to find the source.
Like a clock - tick, tock- audible from 20 feet.

It sounds like points opening and closing. The motor starts and runs normally.

But the alarm doesn't chirp when I hit the remote (it did, twice, but then it wouldn't do anything.)

The clicking is coming from the ribbed black box at the top of the picture below, just above the red-ended wires to the battery. Holding my fingers against it I can feel it clicking inside. It must be some kind of relay.
I tapped it lightly, pushed in on the wire bundle connected to it, with no effect.
If I very slightly 'lift' the box a fraction the cadence will stop, or slow down.

I have the charger on it as usual, but worried that this cycling/clicking may not be a good thing to allow to continue: ie: Should I disconnect the battery?
It was not doing it yesterday aft when I was connecting my iPod through the cassette deck.

Today's extreme humidity???

Any comments, suggestions?
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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14,119 Posts
Can't help you much on that on as this is not a stock item. What is it and what is it hooked up to?

If you don't know what it is then try disconnecting it and see what does not work any more. Might give us a clue.
 

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2011 R1200RT
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Did you by any chance install an after market HID system, or did the bike had one when you bought it? This looks like a ballast, and I am wondering if you have a bad relay.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
A couple hours later....
The metronome has stopped. I have no idea why.
And thanks to the posts above, I looked at the black case differently (ie: as a non-stock item).

I traced the lead from the battery to the case: the box is the alarm system, I assume. Would it have been installed at the factory? (doubtful, if viewers don't recognize it)
Pulling, checking and reinstalling the inline fuse resulted in a chirp and arming of the system.

The headlights are still the original (hope to replace the lower beam with a HID unit). The alarm system, jpegs, and the front forks PIAA lights were on it when I bought it. The late original/previous owner bought the LT in May of '99. It was likely one of the first LT's in Ontario. His family told me he took it to Americade in '99 and won bike of the show . If that's true it might have been a very early arrival in N.A..

I've added nothing to it in my three years of ownership. I assume the cb radio is stock, not an add-on. I'm going to remove the 6 cd changer just for the added storage space. The only flaw in the bike is a split along the rider's seat seam, which has gradually increased from 1 inch to 3 since I bought it. I've been reading another thread about the pros and cons of simply cutting the wire to the heated seat, vs. a tupperware peel, to get the seat in for recovering.

If the alarm system is faulty I'm concerned I might get stranded on the road (ex, the BMWMOA in Bloomsburg this summer) if the immobilizer were to 'lock on'.
 

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My apologies in advance, but in removing/replacing seats, I've never had to cut a heated seat wire. IIRC, I had to cut a ziptie or two, disconnect a plug, and unscrew the seat from the support/lift. Where/why would you cut the wires? Again, my apologies if I misunderstood your situation.

Kirk
 

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"but in removing/replacing seats, I've never had to cut a heated seat wire"

my 2002 when it was new the connector was hidden quite well couldnt get hands onto it to unplug without removing the plastic, some people cut the wires to get the seat off, others who worked on the bike themselves repositioned the wire and it was never a problem after that.
 

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2011 R1200RT
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You definitely do not want to cut the wire. It may be a bit troublesome to unplug the very first time, but once out you can flip around the white clip that holds the connector so it will be emuch easier next time around, or you could even break that little bugger off the frame so the connector can "float" around. It will help if you can loosen the left side panel where the holding clip is hiding, just so you can get your fingers in there and disconnect.
 

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Thanks! Now I remember, I did have to loosen the side panel, and then you can disconnect.

Kirk
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the feedback, everyone.
First, the ticking/tocking stopped and hasn't repeated, and the alarm has re-armed normally. But I still have no idea why it would be cycling as it was.

As to the seat issue: there are numerous replies here in other threads recommending simply cutting the wire and installing a quick connect so that future removals, if needed, can be easily facilitated in a few seconds.

ex: "Originally Posted by RonKMiller
The top ten reasons (OK...eleven) why you should just leave the tupperware alone and cut the little buggers:
1. Spending probably an hour or more (at your first attempt..) locating all the screws that need to be removed to take off the tupperware
2. Keeping track of about 15 screws (some of different length - of course!)
3. Stripping those screws when re-installing them
4. Going to the local hardware store to find a metric tap to chase out the threads in the "clamp" nuts that you have also stripped. See no. 3.
5. Stripping the rubber out of the "jack" nuts and then having to go to the BMW dealer for the proper metric ones to replace them
6. Breaking the small plastic locater tab in the front of the tip over bar trim
7. Losing the small foam rubber shims that are mounted between the tupperware that keep it from buzzing at idle
8. Wondering where that loud new buzzing sound came from. See No. 7
9. Getting carple tunnel syndrome from overuse of your wrist while manually screwing in all the torx screws one at a time
10. Spending another hour putting it all back together - if you are lucky
11. Realizing that it was probably not a very good idea to put another wire tie back in place of the one you cut off a couple of hours ago "


I admit to having little interest in doing my first tupperware peel. But I would appreciate any arguments for the other side.

Going back to the alarm and immobilizer function:
Have any of you had a malfunction while far from home, with the bike's systems completely shut down?
Or perhaps lost your alarm fob with the system armed?
If this happens, what do you do?? (A friend's HD friend had to trailer his bike home 1200 miles when his immobilizer totally shut him down)
 

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2011 R1200RT
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There is absolutely no need to remove the tupperware in order to disconnect the seat wire. Just remove the screw joining the 2 left panels under the driver seat so you have a little play that will allow you to get to the connector. What some have done is to reverse the little plastic bracket that holds the connector (somehow the factory put all of them on backward... :D) once you have it in your hand.
Do NOT cut the wire... you will gain nothing by doing this... There IS already a quick connect. Not sure where that silly idea came from. Really!
 

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DeeJay said:
Thanks for the feedback, everyone.
First, the ticking/tocking stopped and hasn't repeated, and the alarm has re-armed normally. But I still have no idea why it would be cycling as it was.

As to the seat issue: there are numerous replies here in other threads recommending simply cutting the wire and installing a quick connect so that future removals, if needed, can be easily facilitated in a few seconds.

ex: "Originally Posted by RonKMiller
The top ten reasons (OK...eleven) why you should just leave the tupperware alone and cut the little buggers:
1. Spending probably an hour or more (at your first attempt..) locating all the screws that need to be removed to take off the tupperware
2. Keeping track of about 15 screws (some of different length - of course!)
3. Stripping those screws when re-installing them
4. Going to the local hardware store to find a metric tap to chase out the threads in the "clamp" nuts that you have also stripped. See no. 3.
5. Stripping the rubber out of the "jack" nuts and then having to go to the BMW dealer for the proper metric ones to replace them
6. Breaking the small plastic locater tab in the front of the tip over bar trim
7. Losing the small foam rubber shims that are mounted between the tupperware that keep it from buzzing at idle
8. Wondering where that loud new buzzing sound came from. See No. 7
9. Getting carple tunnel syndrome from overuse of your wrist while manually screwing in all the torx screws one at a time
10. Spending another hour putting it all back together - if you are lucky
11. Realizing that it was probably not a very good idea to put another wire tie back in place of the one you cut off a couple of hours ago "


I admit to having little interest in doing my first tupperware peel. But I would appreciate any arguments for the other side.

Going back to the alarm and immobilizer function:
Have any of you had a malfunction while far from home, with the bike's systems completely shut down?
Or perhaps lost your alarm fob with the system armed?
If this happens, what do you do?? (A friend's HD friend had to trailer his bike home 1200 miles when his immobilizer totally shut him down)

Reasons not to cut the seat heater wire:

1. Only a hack cuts a wire within inches of a connector.
2. If you don't have the skill to install a screw without stripping it, you probably don't have the skill to cut the right wires and reconnect them reasonably well.
3. You will have to remove the tupperware some day, maybe along the road in a remote area, so why not learn how to do it under controlled conditions.
4. The "repair" will forever brand you as a kludge artist to everyone in the future who works on the bike.
5. It shows you put speed before quality.

:bmw:
 
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