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Discussion Starter #1
Here are my throttle cable replacement observations so how I spent my Sunday.

Having waited two months to get the throttle cable upgrade parts from Chicago BMW I was in no big hurry to get this done. so being the procrastinator that I am I finally told myself I had to get off my duff and do this. I stripped the bike down to the 24k level. I remember reading that some one did this without taking the air box off; they must have been magicians!

I removed the fan cowling, two screws holding that on. I also removed the handle bar covers both sides and the cover around the ignition. There was no way I could get the new cable ends installed without removing the air box. Here’s why; there is a small circlip that holds the throttle cable in place behind the cruise control plate. This must be removed in order to change it out. I guess to could unscrew the cruise control switch but I thought the air box removal would be best. You have to get to that clip from above. Plus it’s just plain easier to change out the cables with out that air box in the way!

The air box comes straight off after you have unclipped two non reusable hose clamps on the first and second throttle body and then unscrew the third and forth re useable hose clamps. There is also one screw you have to remove that holds the airport to the air tunnel which goes out to the front of the bike. You really have to tug on that air box to get if off. I just kept wiggling it back and forth and it finally slid off the throttle bodies.

So now comes the fun part, the hand grip disassembly. Having installed the Phoenix light switch to my bike I sort of remembered how the grip comes apart, sorta…….
Words can not describe how I got this done! There are a few very small screws that hold this thing together. The toughest part was how to remove the old cable holder. Once I had the cable ends off, the retaining plate was still there and I could see two small screws behind the hand grip that held it. How do you get to those? Well turn the hand grip a short distance and its slides off about an inch giving you enough room to unscrew the two screws. I found this out by accident. Then you have to snip a ¾” section off the old plate off to get it completely gone.

I taped the new cables to the old ones and feed them down by pulling the old cables. This worked ok but the clearance is minimal at the steering head. The throttle opening cable has a green tape attached to it by the way. I held the throttle bodies open so I could remove and replace the lower cable. This just took patience and a long needle nose pliers and a long screwdriver. Then I removed the circlip off the upper cable and slide it out along with the spring for the cruise control switch. This cable was the easiest to do.

I then cut an elongated hole in the lower handle bar cover with my Dremel tool so I could feed the upper ends of the cables through it. I installed the new cable retaining plate to the hand grip. Then I positioned the cables (make sure you mark the throttle opening cable some way so you don’t install them backwards!) and hooked them to the hand grip and aligned the cables in the grooves. I re-assembled the hand grip and adjusted the tension until it moved freely and felt right. I made sure the cruise control switch was working too.

I then cleaned the throttle bodies because they were dirty after 59k of running. Then I bought two new hose clamps to replace the clamps on number 1 and 2 throttle body. Be sure these clamps to not interfere with the throttle body openers and spring holders. They have to be installed so they don’t block the operation. I reinstalled the air box and then everything else until I could start the bike after the gas tank was back on. I started fine so I completed the re assembly. I took a test ride and liked the new feel of the throttle. Very different than what I was used to.

The hardest thing about this install was the hand grip disassembly and the hook up of the new cable ends to the throttle body cam and the cable ends back into the hand grip. The air box was no picnic either. But I had read other install comments and referred to the BMW manual several times so I was able to muck my way through this. I started at 10am and finished at 5:30pm including a run to the parts store for hose clamps and carb cleaner plus a short lunch break. I can only feel better having known the dealer charge for this would have been at least 400.00 give or take a c note. I love saving money when I can but this plum tired me out!

Sorry no pictures but there are a lot of pictures in the FAQ.
 

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Throttle cable replacement

Good job John on getting the cables replaced. I am beginning my cables replacement job and it has started off slowly. I was finally able to remove the cover (which took way too much time) and now am awaiting the cables from Chicago BMW.

Thanks for the advice on the two screws you referred to in your post. I was wondering how those things will be coming out and will now use your advice for their removal.

I am looking forward to the new cables and will be doing some 24k maintenance while I have her stripped down.

Thanks.
 

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Went through the whole process a few months ago. It was a PITA, but worth it. The good news is, once you have done this, it won't be hard if you have to do it again! (Assuming, in my case, that my small mind doesn't forget everything it managed to learn the first time around!)
 

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I did cable upgrades 2 years ago & did NOT have to remove air box :confused:
You did however need to remove injector rail to gain access to the lower cables anchor point.

Just received my "Newest" version of cables from Chicago BMW last month, so this winter will be easier than the first time :D
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks

Thanks James,
It was a job but not an impossible one. The benefits, my wrist will not get as tired from turning that stiff throttle.

beemer100 said:
Good job John on getting the cables replaced. I am beginning my cables replacement job and it has started off slowly. I was finally able to remove the cover (which took way too much time) and now am awaiting the cables from Chicago BMW.

Thanks for the advice on the two screws you referred to in your post. I was wondering how those things will be coming out and will now use your advice for their removal.

I am looking forward to the new cables and will be doing some 24k maintenance while I have her stripped down.

Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
injector rail

It looked to me that the airbox was easier to remove than the injector rail. I did not want to take a chance on messing something up with all those connections, o-rings and such. The airbox only had 4 hose clamps and 1 screw holding it. Glad it worked for ya.


motorhead said:
I did cable upgrades 2 years ago & did NOT have to remove air box :confused:
You did however need to remove injector rail to gain access to the lower cables anchor point.

Just received my "Newest" version of cables from Chicago BMW last month, so this winter will be easier than the first time :D
 

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Because of my huge hands, I did remove the rail. It wasn't all that hard, but it would be easy to mess up stuff if you are not careful. The best thing I did was have the instructions right in front of me all the time 'cause (as I said before) I have a tiny mind and details seem to slip away if I don't have "reminders" handy. The archives have some good directions, the cd manual is okay, and the new Clymer manual is an excellent tool.
 

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I've done a couple of these and didn't remove the air box or injector rail either time. It took a few tries to get the lower cable ends hooked, but I got them. I guess all those years fitting bicycle brake cables paid off.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
magician

I knew there was one in this crowd. Show off! (-;


meese said:
I've done a couple of these and didn't remove the air box or injector rail either time. It took a few tries to get the lower cable ends hooked, but I got them. I guess all those years fitting bicycle brake cables paid off.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Not sure but if a picture was to be available I bet it would be a good one!
 

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Did both injector rail and air box

Good Job on the write up.
I decided to remove both the airbox and fuel rail when I did mine as I have no tolerance for little aggravating things.The long needle nose pliers did not work for me. They ended up a crossed the garage in the wall needle nose first :D
What a difference the new cables made !!!!!
It was well worth the time and effort
 

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bringing back the dead...... replacing the throttle cable

My 2002 with 26,000 miles seems to be OK and my guess, since I've owned it since it had 1,000 miles is that it is the original. In reading several threads about it sticking and being replaced, my question is: How do you know it needs to be replaced? Is there an easy way to determine if it is the newer version?
 

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Thanks for taking the time to write down your experiences.

I have had new cables for almost a year, and still have not built up the never to do the install.

I also would like to drill a weep hole for the slave cylinder...maybe some rainy day.
 

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dandiver said:
My 2002 with 26,000 miles seems to be OK and my guess, since I've owned it since it had 1,000 miles is that it is the original. In reading several threads about it sticking and being replaced, my question is: How do you know it needs to be replaced? Is there an easy way to determine if it is the newer version?
1. When you are seriously considering adding vice grips to the right grip it's time to change cables.

2. The new and old cables look different on the bike. Look at the ends of the cable and the "relay" where the cables go into the grip. They will be different. Look at the cable routing on the bottom of the right handlebar cover. The new cables usually need a hole in the bottom of the cover.
 

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seems OK so far...

thanks, guess I'll have to compare with a new one to see the difference. Not noticeable at this point.
 

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dandiver said:
My 2002 with 26,000 miles seems to be OK and my guess, since I've owned it since it had 1,000 miles is that it is the original. In reading several threads about it sticking and being replaced, my question is: How do you know it needs to be replaced? Is there an easy way to determine if it is the newer version?
Dano,

I've asked myself and others the same question...

My 2002 has over 50K on the clock and I don't think my throttle feels any different or stiffer than a new one. :)

Maybe we just got lucky, and a few '02s were indeed assembled right! :bmw:
 

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Somewhere in the bmw literature, I thought that bmw suggested to change out the cables every 36,000.
 

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My 02 cable is original

Checked it a little while ago after a 2 hour ride today and mine is original with 27,000 miles and seems to be very easy to twist. Guess I just got lucky.... After reading what it takes to swap it out, that is one task I'd prefer to read about and not do.
 
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