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Discussion Starter #1
I went to lower my modular helmet, the street behind me was empty, and I'm doing about 30 or so, so I figure a quick 'let go, pull down with one hand while holding helmet with the other' maneuver wouldn't be a problem.

That's when the combination of no hands, plus low gear deceleration caused the handlebars to start wobbling. A quick grab got things under control, and it WAS an unusual situation...but, uh...I thought the steering damper was supposed to prevent that?
 

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Is the damper fully functioning? It is supposed to stop it from uncontrollability...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Cochinosucio said:
Is the damper fully functioning? It is supposed to stop it from uncontrollability...
It's functioning, lord only knows it's FULLY functioning.
 

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Do a search...there are a lot of posts on here about that symptom. Some think it's related to tires and some just think it's a peculiarity of the LT, maybe related to front fork rake, weight, etc. I know one thing...I did the same thing you did one time and never did it again. :D
 

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Most of us that have been through it have found that the right set of new tyres will solve the problem, at least until they have worn appreciably. The Metz seemed to have a manufacturing issue for a while.
An old clip of the problem... K1200LT steering wobble
 

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Discussion Starter #6
cws said:
Most of us that have been through it have found that the right set of new tyres will solve the problem, at least until they have worn appreciably. The Metz seemed to have a manufacturing issue for a while.
An old clip of the problem... K1200LT steering wobble
There seems to be an unusual amount of play in the bushings that mount the dampener, but without a second example, it's hard to say. The metzler up front isn't that old (3000 miles or so)

But like above, I'm not going to try it again!
 

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My opinion:
You likely have a stretched bead on the front tire. Without going into a long explanation, that's likely the problem and I know of no way to confirm that it's stretched. While it's an exaggerated example, try rolling a tapered rubber cork in a straight line on a smooth floor to see the problem a stretched bead causes. The tire tries to turn and then the gyroscopic forces correct it into a straight line. Turn, correct, repeat, wobble, tank slap.
 

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That is a common thing. The right set of circumstances during slow deceleration and it will wobble. I never felt it wobble even with only one hand on bars,so moral of the story, keep at least one hand on at all times and don't worry about it.
 

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Rocketsled said:
There seems to be an unusual amount of play in the bushings that mount the dampener, but without a second example, it's hard to say. The metzler up front isn't that old (3000 miles or so)

But like above, I'm not going to try it again!
Test the damper with front wheel off the ground. Move bars side to side slowly, then fast. If it is working you will feel a difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
jzeiler said:
Test the damper with front wheel off the ground. Move bars side to side slowly, then fast. If it is working you will feel a difference.
I feel a difference...but I ALSO notice a lot of play in the dampener with little movement, like bushings might be worn. It's not a _violent_ shake (it's identical to the video a few links up from here) and might correspond to the play in bushings.
 

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You will get some play at the damper (normal), however, it should REALLY slow down rapid movement changes, while allowing free, unrestricted slower movements.
 

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RonKMiller said:
Explained here in detail - it can happen to any motorcycle:

All you've got to do is stop making so many left turns. Really.

Motorcycle Tire Wear
OUTSTANDING PRIVATE PYLE!
 

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Its telling you that it's time for a new front tire.

My front is showing a lot of wear, would not surprise me much if mine did that.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
gunny said:
Its telling you that it's time for a new front tire.

My front is showing a lot of wear, would not surprise me much if mine did that.
I hope not...they still have the rubber nurples on them!

IMG_1578 by Matey-O, on Flickr
 

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That tire shows classic front left tire "scalloping/scuffing". :rolleyes: The mold nipples have NOTHING to do with it.





If you don't want to spend the time reading the article I mentioned... :p

Scalloping is dramatically increased by consistent under inflation. You need to check your tires EVERY time you ride and 42/48 psi is the consensus inflation mark - over the years - to avoid premature wear.

The LT is a very heavy bike, and if you brake while cornering you will cut the life of the tire by 50%. In my experience, with the exception of riders specifically trained for road racing, 99% of riders brake into corners.

Eventually - even if you take excellent care of your tires - scalloping, the attendant noise and loss of traction will occur.

Entropy rules. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #19
RonKMiller said:
That tire shows classic front left tire "scalloping/scuffing". :rolleyes: The mold nipples have NOTHING to do with it.

Scalloping is dramatically increased by consistent under inflation. You need to check your tires EVERY time you ride and 42/48 psi is the consensus inflation mark - over the years - to avoid premature wear.

Eventually - even if you take excellent care of your tires - scalloping, the attendant noise and loss of traction will occur.

Entropy rules. :D
Man. NOBODY has a sence of humor around here. :p I read the article. Recognized the symptoms as the Battleax I took off looked like it had a waffleprint and howled like a banshee.

I've been pretty good at keeping on top of the tire pressure and most likely brake in corners. Honestly, the tread profile looks good, but that's to rather ignorant eyes.
 

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RonKMiller said:
with the exception of riders specifically trained for road racing,[/i][/b] 99% of riders brake into corners.Eventually - even if you take excellent care of your tires - scalloping, the attendant noise and loss of traction will occur.

Entropy rules. :D
This statistic should also include Police Motor Operators, who are trained to to break into turns,
 
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