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I have not found this exact discussion on the forum, so has anyone used a suction mount for a go pro one the outside of the RT windscreen. It appears to me that there is not a flat enough spot to give a secure attachment. Thanks for considering this.
 

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Haven't done it with my '22. Did with my '17, but not without a lanyard as backup. Have since found better ways to mount. I actually like having the bike in the shot for perspective. I also use a 360 cam so I'm not limited by what's in front of the camera. I just have a gopro mount stuck to the top of my XM radio mushroom and use a short extension to get the camera up and back a little to capture the dash.

 

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I tried using my GPS with a suction cup and kept falling off. I had a lanyard attached but having the unit fall creates a hazardous situation.
 

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That’s my concern as there does not seem to be a flat enough surface on this beautiful windscreen
Not only that, but, depending on what year RT you have, the windscreen vibrates a lot as well. When I started having video on my RT, I used to use the suction-cup mount for my then GoPro Hero 5 Black, but to the front fairing. Never had it comes off, but I did fashioned a safety lanyard for the event that suction-cup lets go. However, bike-mounted action cam is very boring because of the limited fixed view angle. If you are going to do it, it will be better, as noted by prior post, to have at least a little bit of the bike in the video frame, for perspective.

You will find that helmet-mount of the camera will be better than bike-mount. However, as posted in previous post also, the ideal thing to do is to get a good 360° camera and mount that on the bike. Here, if you have the right camera, you can present your video in an almost infinite ways! I use the Insta360 One X2, which is now superseded by X3, which I will recommend. All that you will need to consider is, specifically, where to mount the camera on the bike. My preference is for the handlebar. How high off the ground the camera is mounted also matters, since that will affect the speed perception in the video. Here are a couple of examples, to show what I mean. These video had been previously posted in this forum:

For "ride video", the camera should be relatively low, as in this video:


If you want to show the scenery around you, and having the ride as being secondary, you would put the camera (in the same mount location as in the previous video) higher, to get better views, but you will lose the the sense of speed and agility, to some degrees, depending on the height of the camera. Here's an example:

 
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Great advice, thanks. Mine is the 21 Blue RT and I love it. We have many curvy roads and elevation changes in South Central Texas, referred to as the Hill Country. Spirited rides each week to numerous destinations are so much fun with the 1250 shift cam engine. I’ll save up my penny’s for the instacam.
 

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BTW, for the suction-cup mount - if you do decide to go with it, make sure that you wet the suction surfaces with water each time that you put it on. That's probably what kept mine on, when I was using the mount.
 

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This is a complicated topic, and I'll throw some comments out there, to see if anyone wants any follow-up information.

All of this comes from my personal experience, from owning GoPro Hero4, 7, 9, and 11 cameras (and a Liquid Image action cam before them), and having mounted them in assorted ways on my own Burgman 650, Victory Cross Country Tour, and C 400 GT, and a rented Niken for a week.

Intended Use, e.g., Straight-Forward Documentation, Rider's POV, 360° Scenery, etc.:

You have to, um, focus, on what you want to get out of the camera. Are you interested in documenting a day (or more), or some short-term scenery, or, say, a vlog (ala that consummate professional Itchy Boots), and so forth.

Your choice will have a major impact on what camera you get -- say, a standard action cam vs. a 360° camera -- how you mount a camera, and how you power it, for instance.

Me, I like to document a full day's ride, with absolute minimal fuss, and select any highlight reels afterward. Hence my choice of bike power and fixed mount.

You can't record a full day of 360° video, because it would be too much data, you can't power one of those all day, and you'd have to swap memory cards. They do give you maximum viewpoints, after the fact, when you're editing the files, though.

World traveler Itchy Boots mostly uses a helmet-mounted camera, along with a mic, and has to pick and choose her time to record, and swap batteries, and maybe memory cards. So that's sort of in the middle.

On Helmet or Bike:

If you want a real rider's POV, you might favor a helmet mount. IB uses a motocross-style helmet, with a lot of room in the chin area, and a clip mount on the chin bar. A helmet mount has the advantage that you can turn your head sideways to capture interesting scenery.

Another helmet location is a GoPro mount that you stick on the side or on top of a helmet. That eliminates the possibility of mushing a camera into your chest in a get-off, but has the disadvantages of being out in the wind and not knowing whether you really turned on the camera, is it still recording, and so forth. As IB points out in one of your blogs, if you have the camera in front of you, e.g., her chin-bar mount, you can tell that it's still recording.

Back to my use: since I don't want to fiddle with anything -- a just set it and forget it setup -- I need bike power, and no battery or card swapping. So it's on-bike mounting for me.

For the last four bikes, I think it is, I've used rainproof USB products from 3BR Powersports, if anyone's interested:


Of course, if you're a true professional at this, you can just do as IB does, and use multiple cameras: on helmet, on handlebars (and, on occasion, other parts of the bike, e.g., down near the wheels), and sometimes drone recordings.

In Front Of Or Behind A Windscreen (Or Someplace Else):

If your setup will be on bike, I've experimented over the years, and settled on mounting in front of the windscreen.

On a GoPro Hero, you have about 1 square inch to keep clean. And if you need to replace the lens cover (if it gets hit by a rock, say), you're out about $20, I think.

If you mount behind a windscreen, you have to deal with keeping a larger area clean, and reflections, and a loss of light if the screen's tinted.

If you mount it somewhere else -- on a crashbar, for instance, which I've experimented with -- you get interesting video, but, IMO, it gets old after a while, especially when documenting a full day's ride.

I've also settled on one or two suction cups. I used two on a Burgman for some time, but that was probably overkill, as I've also never had a problem with one. Here's a pic of that double-suction-cup setup:
Motor vehicle Gas Telephone Personal protective equipment Corded phone


(BTW, that uses some parts of a Delkin Dual Fat Gecko product; see www.delkindevices.com/products/accessories/fat-gecko/ and www.amazon.com/Delkin-Devices-Suction-Camera-DDMOUNT-SUCTION/dp/B0023ZK2TY/ . Interestingly, it's my assertion that the suction-cup components of that Delkin product are made by Panavise, or at least the two companies have a common supplier for those pieces.)

Where was I? Oh, right, I've had the Panavise 13101 for half a dozen years or so, and am completely pleased with it (and actually just recently bought another as a backup spare):


It's also available at Amazon, in various configurations (i.e., extra gizmos), e.g.:


The trick here is to clean the suction cup and the windscreen thoroughly with alcohol, let dry, and lock in place. Periodically, you need to unlock (but not detach), push the air out, and relock. And of course add a tether, just for good karma.

Something Else For The 1250 RT:

I was looking at the front of the RT, because of the mention of all curved surfaces. That certainly looks to be the case: I was looking at all the close-ups in this Cycle World review:


And it certainly looks curvy, all right. I was thinking that if I owned one I might add a 15mm rod in front of the windshield, using the lower two Torx screws on each side that hold the windscreen in place.

If anyone's unaware of this, 15mm (diameter) rods have become the de facto standard for extension rods for all manner of photographic supports. And because of that, there's a wealth of various brackets, connecting gizmos, etc.

For instance, I think something like this might work (and while I don't know the distance between those screws, the rods come in many lengths). This is just a possible mounting configuration -- something similar, or maybe these exact products:
Something like that.

A couple of quick notes on two of those:
  • I have used a bunch of Smatree gizmos over the years. They're inexpensive, but well made, IMO.
  • That Ulanzi quick-release bracket is the cat's meow, right up there with the Panavise in terms of being my favorite mounting product.
The Ulanzi allows you to pop the camera off in a second or two, to put in a topcase for a lunch stop, and then remount it exactly as it was positioned before, in another second or two. Most highly recommended for most on-bike mountings.

I have experimented with a 15mm rod setup, mostly on my Victory. This was a behind-the-screen setup -- hey, I was experimenting:
Photograph Motor vehicle Vehicle Hood Automotive tire


And here's a pic of some additional experimentation I did, a year or so later, using 15mm products (along with some standard 1" RAM products) on a Burgman:
Motor vehicle Hood Automotive design Automotive tire Tire


Back to the Panavise, here's my in-front, suction-cup, fairing mount on the Vic (vs. the 15mm rod setup behind the windscreen). Note that it's offset, to the side, to avoid that ridge/creased area down the middle of the fairing:
Hood Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Vehicle Automotive design


And here's my current setup, on my current ride, the C 400 GT:
Hood Vehicle Motor vehicle Grass Reflex camera


Plant Vehicle Motor vehicle Automotive tire Hood


Fixed On-Bike Highlight Reel Examples:

In 2019, I rode a Niken (solo) during an Edelweiss "Touring Center Alps" week, and this past May (this time with my wife as passenger) I was piloting a C 400 X for two of their scooter tours, in Tuscany and Vienna. I used that exact same Panavise single-suction-cup, with Ulanzi quick-release, mounting system (minus the rainproof 3BR USB setup) for those tours that I'm currently using at home.

Here are a couple of my favorite highlight reels in the Alps, from that earlier trip, so anyone interested can see what sort of videos that kind of setup choice produces (when highlight reels are later extracted from a day's videos). For those trips I simply popped in a fresh memory card for each day, and downloaded them all to my computer when I got home.

The first, oh, half of this is probably my favorite, in terms of sheer scenic beauty:


This one was earlier in the week, and for the first ten minutes or so (until a regrouping after a construction zone, at which time I almost fell over) I was moving out on the Niken, behind the fast guy in the group (who was behind the faster guide):


More recently, here's a short video while riding the C 400 GT, two-up with my wife, just enjoying the fall foliage in the Catskill Mountains of NYS this past October:


So, in sum, that's the sort of thing I'm aiming for, with zero, or at least negligible, fiddling with equipment during the day. I'm certainly open to any follow-up questions, if anyone has any for me.
 

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@wspollack Excellent write up.

For what it is worth this is how I set my 2019 1250RT up. I basically have two remote controls on the handlebar for a GoPro and the Insta 360 one R. I have moved on a bit from this setup and last year more or less had the GoPro on the Ram Claw facing back and a 360 X2 on the handlebar.



This video of the Tandragee 100 race course which is 5 miles from me shows you what can be achieved with the 360 camera, scroll forward to about 4 minutes to see the various viewing angles

 

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@wspollack Excellent write up.

For what it is worth this is how I set my 2019 1250RT up. I basically have two remote controls on the handlebar for a GoPro and the Insta 360 one R. I have moved on a bit from this setup and last year more or less had the GoPro on the Ram Claw facing back and a 360 X2 on the handlebar.
...
This video of the Tandragee 100 race course which is 5 miles from me shows you what can be achieved with the 360 camera, scroll forward to about 4 minutes to see the various viewing angles
...
David:

That is one well-farkled bike you have. I didn't know many of those products existed ...

... including that GuardConcept GoPro holder on the front of your RT (www.wunderlichamerica.com/bmw-r1250-rt-camrack-go-pro.html). That's the sort of holder I was dreaming up for the OP, @Johnstoneturbo, when I was looking at 15mm rod products. And only to find that someone already makes a bracket that uses the same mounting screws that I was looking at. (I'd still add a ballhead and Ulanzi quick-release, even if they made that mount for my scooter, if I were mounting a regular GoPro, as opposed to a 360 camera and those long extensions.)

That is one fine 360 video you made, and nice riding. I bet that took a lot of time to do that editing work. In any case, it's a good demonstration of the capabilities of 360 cameras and the post-recording effects that can be used.

Oh, and thanks for the kind words.
 

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@wspollack Hi Bill things have moved on from that video. I now have a 21 R1250RT and an Insta X2 along with a GoPro 8. I am now considering an Insta X3 to add to my collection.

The main thing for these camera's (IMHO) is having a remote control to switch them on and off. Last year in the Alps I ran the X2 on the handlebar and charged it from the Aux port on the right side. I also ran the GoPro from the Aux on the back left of the bike.

I had two remotes on the handlebar one for each camera and it worked well. On one occasion in the Alps I forgot to put the cable away for the X2 and it got wet, when I plugged it back in the X2 kept switching off, at the time I didn't know what the problem was but I quickly swopped the GoPro from the back of the bike to the windscreen mount and used it.

Its always good to have a plan B.

This will give you an idea of what those two camera's can produce:


Now if I get a new Insta X3 for the handlebar's and put the Insta X2 on the back then think of all the new views I can get, cause I just got the new Insta remote which will switch both of those cameras on and then I have the GoPro, could put it on the windscreen, starting to hallucinate now. :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::oops::love::cool:
 

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@wspollack Hi Bill things have moved on from that video. I now have a 21 R1250RT and an Insta X2 along with a GoPro 8. I am now considering an Insta X3 to add to my collection.

The main thing for these camera's (IMHO) is having a remote control to switch them on and off. Last year in the Alps I ran the X2 on the handlebar and charged it from the Aux port on the right side. I also ran the GoPro from the Aux on the back left of the bike.

I had two remotes on the handlebar one for each camera and it worked well. On one occasion in the Alps I forgot to put the cable away for the X2 and it got wet, when I plugged it back in the X2 kept switching off, at the time I didn't know what the problem was but I quickly swopped the GoPro from the back of the bike to the windscreen mount and used it.

Its always good to have a plan B.

This will give you an idea of what those two camera's can produce:


Now if I get a new Insta X3 for the handlebar's and put the Insta X2 on the back then think of all the new views I can get, cause I just got the new Insta remote which will switch both of those cameras on and then I have the GoPro, could put it on the windscreen, starting to hallucinate now. :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes::oops::love::cool:
That video -- especially the 360 front/rear views -- is wonderfully evocative of the actual experience of riding in the Alps and vicinity. Nice job.

In addition to having done some of that in 2019, on Edelweiss' Touring Center Alps, I am booked for this July with one of their longer versions, Ultimate Alps Tour. I plan on sticking to a front-mounted Hero11, is all, because I don't have your patience or editing skills.
 

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In addition to having done some of that in 2019, on Edelweiss' Touring Center Alps, I am booked for this July with one of their longer versions, Ultimate Alps Tour. I plan on sticking to a front-mounted Hero11, is all, because I don't have your patience or editing skills.
Excellent, I am off to Block Forest and Voges in June.
 

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Excellent, I am off to Block Forest and Voges in June.
Btw, I forgot to ask you: in vimeo.com/743454288, what app did you use to generate those oil-painting-like stills, such as the one at 2:38 (if you don't mind sharing that info)?
 

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Btw, I forgot to ask you: in vimeo.com/743454288, what app did you use to generate those oil-painting-like stills, such as the one at 2:38 (if you don't mind sharing that info)?
I use powerdirector for editing video and it's sister product is photodirector.
 

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I have not found this exact discussion on the forum, so has anyone used a suction mount for a go pro one the outside of the RT windscreen. It appears to me that there is not a flat enough spot to give a secure attachment. Thanks for considering this.
I have, I didn't have any issues with it falling off, the GoPro suction cup is pretty stout (and I guess I was lucky too). it seemed to work pretty well but if you raise your windscreen even a little you get more vibration in the video.
 

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I have, I didn't have any issues with it falling off, the GoPro suction cup is pretty stout (and I guess I was lucky too). it seemed to work pretty well but if you raise your windscreen even a little you get more vibration in the video.
I'm with you.

I should've made clearer (post #8, above) that I would first try a suction cup on the windshield -- especially the one I cited that I really like, the Panavise 13101 -- before going to the route of adding some fabricated or purchased cross-piece(s) of metal.

That is -- up to a certain point, of course -- it's more important that a suction cup is placed on a smooth surface, as opposed to a completely flat one. So I'd first see whether the (very good but not very expensive) Panavise (or the double-cup Fat Gecko) worked OK on the windshield, curves and all.

As anyone might have noted from the pics, I like to use a suction cup on the most stable part of a windshield. This is typically near the bottom or midway between upper and lower mounting screws. That said, the newer GoPro Heros -- recall that I have four of them -- do impressively and increasingly well with their software-based stabilization. I'm talking especially the Hero7 and on, with Hypersmooth turned on. So I wouldn't concern myself with vibration.

With a suction cup on an RT's windshield, it seems to me (and, again, I don't own that bike), you'll have to get creative in terms of circling it with a cable tether.
 

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My stuff is pretty old, I think my GoPro is the 2nd or 3rd generation and the Suction mount was from GoPro. I probably should secure it with a safety tether but that suction mount is so hard to get off I felt fairly confident that I wouldn't lose the camera.
 
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