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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I've got my LT down for some major service work this winter and I'm replacing shocks, putting a new Rhine West chip in as I've already gone to a Remus exhaust, and adjusting valves among other things. Since I'm up to about 56K on my 02, I thought it would be a good idea to replace my brake hoses with braided steel ones. Has anybody done this and which manufacturer did they go with? How would one accomplish this with the integrated brake system? I've changed the fluid on the bike using the procedure I found, I believe on this site, but changing the lines would introduce a bunch of air into the system, and I'm not sure if I would be able to purge it on my own.
 

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Read This post by Grifscoots as a primer. But, I do not know of anyone with an '02 or later that has done the job themselves.
 

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you want spieglers...

their installations and rotating fittings are superior to anyone else's offering....

and yes - they are lifetime compared to 4-5 years on the OEM.

fitting the rears may be troublesome, however. when i burst a line this spring and had to do the fronts, looking at the shop manual casued me to leave the OEM line in place - the manual shows the rear subframe needing to come off to replace the rear line.

someone may pipe up and say that's not necessary, in fact, i'd love for that to happen. ;-) then i'd take my spiegler rear line out of the saddle bag and put it on. ;-)
 

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ss brake lines by Spiegler

I replaced my rubber hoses last summer after my front brake hose ruptured. My bike has 52K miles and is a 2001. I didn't have a problem replacing front or rear. It was a bit more difficult to align the rear where it bolts in at the pedal.
 

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lavamanz said:
I replaced my rubber hoses last summer after my front brake hose ruptured. My bike has 52K miles and is a 2001. I didn't have a problem replacing front or rear. It was a bit more difficult to align the rear where it bolts in at the pedal.
Joe,
Does the brake level/pedal feel more stiff after going to the SS lines?
 

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pedal feel

I didn't notice much change on the rear although I think I'm pretty worn on my pads. On the front the brakes had gotten quite spongy and I had noticed that I would often grab the brake lever several times to get good feel. It was the spongy feel thay caused me to bleed the front brakes in the garage and the line ruptured.

here's a link to the location of the rupture
http://www.bmwlt.com/gallery/browseimages.php?do=searchresults&searchid=510

I would say I don't find myself grabbing the lever multiple times anymore but from what I've read the ABS unit is probably causing some of the sponginess everyone feels.
 

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firmness...

...was much improved.

i'm somewhat puzzed that these pictures show the exact same failure on the front lines that i experienced and under the exact same circumstances.

bleeding brakes, and having the front rupture just above the T.

wonder why there's a weak point there and why do they fail? or if use of vaccum bleeders colapses the line at that point and causes it to fail?

hmmmf.

so the concencus seems to be that the rear line - i have a 2000 - can be replaced without pulling the rear subframe as the manual shows? my reaction to that was the same as the maintenence manual for the abrams tank that shows the turret off and engine pulled to change a spark plug. ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You people that replaced your lines, did anybody have the integrated brakes? That is my main concern, as I think I would have trouble bleeding air out without some dealer specialty equipment.
 

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2005 K1200LT
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Not really, look here for more info:


Mark’s Brake Article

Now that describes the flushing. The bleed would be a bit more difficult but use many of the same techniques. I would highly recommend getting the dealer to perform the "Bleed Test" with the computer to verify you have it back up to specfication. It actually exercises the system and checks pressure ramp up time and will show if there is any residual air in the system.
 

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jzeiler said:
Not really, look here for more info:


Mark’s Brake Article

Now that describes the flushing. The bleed would be a bit more difficult but use many of the same techniques. I would highly recommend getting the dealer to perform the "Bleed Test" with the computer to verify you have it back up to specfication. It actually exercises the system and checks pressure ramp up time and will show if there is any residual air in the system.
Hi John, I always enjoy your tech perspective!

I have (with much help from Mike S.) flushed my '02 brakes.

I am also thinking of going to steel brakes lines on my '02. You mention the "Bleed would be more difficult..."

If we are only replacing the wheel lines, and NOT invading the control circuit lines, shouldn't we be able to put on the new metal lines, fill the reservoirs(s), and pump the wheel circuits clear just like we do during a power/lever flush?

If not, what am I missing? :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #13
JATownsend said:
Hi John, I always enjoy your tech perspective!

I have (with much help from Mike S.) flushed my '02 brakes.

I am also thinking of going to steel brakes lines on my '02. You mention the "Bleed would be more difficult..."

If we are only replacing the wheel lines, and NOT invading the control circuit lines, shouldn't we be able to put on the new metal lines, fill the reservoirs(s), and pump the wheel circuits clear just like we do during a power/lever flush?

If not, what am I missing? :confused:
That's a good point. At least for the front it might work, but the rear does not have a separate reservoir for the control circuit, so air would be introduced into that unless one would pinch off the line coming from the reservoir and then would have to watch carefully when refilling it.
 

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You are correct Averill,


Grassroots BMW did that for a member and we shared the approach here. You just feed back the fluid to the reservoir until all the bubbles are gone. I would recommend trashing the first 1/2 pint or so that comes out as it is old and could be contaminated, but once fresh is flowing this would make it a snap. The control circuits would just be a bit more troublesome during a bleed vs. flush depending on how much air is introduced.
 

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John, thanks for your reply! It looks like I will have to add this to my 'Spring' tune-up list.

Hope all is well with you, take care. :)
 
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