BMW Luxury Touring Community banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
72 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Sorry if this has aready been discussed, but what is your opinion on whether these are worth $50.00 plus.
I haven't yet taken anything apart on my bike yet. Will I really need these? It just seems crazy that the nuts and bolts that hold our bike together could be that bad!?
They used the word "oatmeal" to describe the stock fasteners!? Geeeez!

Item number: 250408328607 at www.ebay.com
or go to:

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&ru=http://shop.ebay.com:80/items/?_nkw=250408328607&_sacat=0&_trksid=p3286.m270.l1313&_odkw=Item+number%3A&_osacat=0&_fvi=1&item=250408328607&_rdc=1&viewitem=
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,651 Posts
I bought a set of screws for my LT years ago. They were great, I do not recall who they where from though. These were much better than stock because the all came with rubber washers bonded to each screw. I do not believe that set on ebay is like that. I would hold out for the rubber washers.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,878 Posts
My 2002's screws haven't rusted! Don't know why you would want to just replace them and besides, I always have a few left over every time I work on her. Just keep them in a box and use when needed.....
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,098 Posts
Yep I owned the Murphy kits before I owned the bike.

I love that washer as it gives you compression on the screw. I would look for that kit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,165 Posts
The stock screws are already good quality stainless steel, just black coated. I see absolutely NO reason to change them, other than cost, but if you only need to replace a couple, cost is not really an issue as you can buy quite a few stock screws from the dealer for the cost of a replacement kit, which really offers little to nothing. I would not want shiny screws in the panels anyway.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,795 Posts
Nice part is 6mm T-handle wrench for removal/installation of screws.. no "torx" head.

Mine also minimized "panel talk"..... might be due to the washer and insulation.

The black ones showed signs of 'rust'... probably due to metal left behind by wrenches ...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,108 Posts
A word of caution of on the stainless screws, be sure to use never-seize compound on them as many lower grades of stainless are prone to corrosion in the threads. Without knowing the quality of the aftermarket screws you need to exercise caution or you may find yourself with a bunch of frozen fasteners.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,165 Posts
deanwoolsey said:
A word of caution of on the stainless screws, be sure to use never-seize compound on them as many lower grades of stainless are prone to corrosion in the threads. Without knowing the quality of the aftermarket screws you need to exercise caution or you may find yourself with a bunch of frozen fasteners.
This is not usually a problem when screwed into brass (such as the rubber insert nuts on the side panels around the engine area), or into coated steel, as many of the fasteners are on the LT, but if screwed into aluminum, which a few are, great caution has to be observed, and anti-sieze used. Stainless steel fasteners and aluminum DO NOT play well together! They can easily gall, and when they do, you have a BIG problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,423 Posts
dandiver said:
My 2002's screws haven't rusted! Don't know why you would want to just replace them and besides, I always have a few left over every time I work on her. Just keep them in a box and use when needed.....
+1 Likewise on my 02, and where do those extras come from?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,746 Posts
I know a great reason to change to an aftermarket screwset. Allen ONLY. Dang torx!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,165 Posts
wa1200lt said:
I know a great reason to change to an aftermarket screwset. Allen ONLY. Dang torx!
I do not understand why anyone would not like Torx fasteners. They are a big improvement over hex socket. (Allen is a brand, not a type)

Industry has been improving fastener drives for decades, first was slotted, then Philips, then Hex Socket, then Torx, Now there is Torx Plus. Each one has been an improvement over the previous.

Torx drives are far less likely to strip than Hex socket, and can handle considerably greater torque for the same basic size of driver without stripping. In industrial uses, Hex socket set screws often will "split" and spread when high torque is applied, making them almost impossible to remove. Torx drive set screws greatly reduce that possibility.

Torx is becoming more of a standard as years pass due to the improvement in drive force and reliability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,424 Posts
dshealey said:
I do not understand why anyone would not like Torx fasteners. They are a big improvement over hex socket. (Allen is a brand, not a type)

Industry has been improving fastener drives for decades, first was slotted, then Philips, then Hex Socket, then Torx, Now there is Torx Plus. Each one has been an improvement over the previous.

Torx drives are far less likely to strip than Hex socket, and can handle considerably greater torque for the same basic size of driver without stripping. In industrial uses, Hex socket set screws often will "split" and spread when high torque is applied, making them almost impossible to remove. Torx drive set screws greatly reduce that possibility.

Torx is becoming more of a standard as years pass due to the improvement in drive force and reliability.
+1 on what Mr Shealey said.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,345 Posts
I work with a lot of Torx and Torx Plus in the transmission business. I've picked up a few Torx 25 screws out of Dodge trannies that I have used on the LT. I with I could find a few of those rubber mounted brass nuts for my tupperware. I have a couple that give me a hard time...................... :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,746 Posts
Good points all Mr. Shealey! I didn't make my point very well. My position is really torx or hex (Allen or generic) but why both? One or the other would be good for me.

Anybody know why the Great Engineers in the Fatherland decided to use both when one or the other would have been fine?

Loren

dshealey said:
I do not understand why anyone would not like Torx fasteners. They are a big improvement over hex socket. (Allen is a brand, not a type)

Industry has been improving fastener drives for decades, first was slotted, then Philips, then Hex Socket, then Torx, Now there is Torx Plus. Each one has been an improvement over the previous.

Torx drives are far less likely to strip than Hex socket, and can handle considerably greater torque for the same basic size of driver without stripping. In industrial uses, Hex socket set screws often will "split" and spread when high torque is applied, making them almost impossible to remove. Torx drive set screws greatly reduce that possibility.

Torx is becoming more of a standard as years pass due to the improvement in drive force and reliability.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top