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Discussion Starter #1
my wife has ms and fatigue is a problem. she is still working, but very tired after work .

she is willing to ride but i am not sure how long a ride to take any advice would be helpfull
 

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Sorry to hear. My guess is to let her be the judge on how long, take some local rides with her and illicit feedback from her on how she is feeling, her strength etc. Note approximately how many miles and time she is able to go to determine a pattern which may be helpful in trip planning if she is able and decide to take trips.
 

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If you have a com system, she can talk to you to give you a sense of when she's approximately half way through her tolerance cycle. I suggest starting with a short ride, say 10 miles or so to assess how tiring it is for her so she has a frame of reference to work from.
 

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If you're not already so equiped, you might consider arm rests for her. Both safety and comfort. Also floorboards. My wife likes both. Another consideration might be heated clothing. Being warm is less stressful.
 

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Communicate?
 

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Floor boards and arm rests...........?

Keep the sorties short and talk about it............if she's into the ride, make it comfortable for both of you...............and bless both your hearts............j
 

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+1 on the communications system -- a crucial element.

More important, IMO, is a frank discussion in which it is made *EXTREMELY* clear (and accepted on both sides) that when the strain is becoming inhibiting, she will tell you to -- and she can trust you will be happy to -- call it a day, no matter how long the ride has been.

My SWMBO also suffers from similar issues, to the point that she can no longer maintain her veterinary practice. But she is so desirous of not letting her issues impact those around her, it used to be virtually impossible to get her to say "I'm about done in" (I can't tell you how tramatic it was when she first accepted passengering behind me rather that taking her /5 or GS on a trip -- until a year ago, I had ridden behind her more often than she behind me). It took a lot of talking/work to get her to agree to say something when the limits were being approached, and to accept that I would welcome the feedback. It has made our riding much better for both of us.

HTH,
 

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Palerider said:
Floor boards and arm rests...........?
j
Yes, floorboards, according to my wife, help her maintain seating with less effort. And arm rests allow her to relax her arms and make her feel like she's more secure. Placebo effect probably, but if it helps, what the heck. And when I take my grandson with me, and he falls asleep, he's in securely.

I would also say that, from the wife's perspective, the Russell seat is better than stock in that it has the built up sides which seem to hold her more securely. Less leg effort to maintain her position.

Some will likely disagree, and that's OK. Even the small things could add up to a more enjoyable experience. Just trying to help.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
fpmlt said:
Yes, floorboards, according to my wife, help her maintain seating with less effort. And arm rests allow her to relax her arms and make her feel like she's more secure. Placebo effect probably, but if it helps, what the heck. And when I take my grandson with me, and he falls asleep, he's in securely.

I would also say that, from the wife's perspective, the Russell seat is better than stock in that it has the built up sides which seem to hold her more securely. Less leg effort to maintain her position.

Some will likely disagree, and that's OK. Even the small things could add up to a more enjoyable experience. Just trying to help.
thanks for all suggestions bless you all
 

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fpmlt said:
Yes, floorboards, according to my wife, help her maintain seating with less effort. And arm rests allow her to relax her arms and make her feel like she's more secure. Placebo effect probably, but if it helps, what the heck. And when I take my grandson with me, and he falls asleep, he's in securely.

I would also say that, from the wife's perspective, the Russell seat is better than stock in that it has the built up sides which seem to hold her more securely. Less leg effort to maintain her position.

Some will likely disagree, and that's OK. Even the small things could add up to a more enjoyable experience. Just trying to help.
Frank; my apologize, I hadn't read through the whole thread.........but I agree that the floor boards and arm rests are certainly a good place to start..............keep the faith all, and now I'll sign off...................j
 

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No need Jim, it does sound sort'a silly. But the wife assures me that all those things make for a more comfortable ride for her. And we all know what making the wife comfortable does for our lives ;)
 

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+1 on the suggestions above.
My SO loves the Muddelman armrests and floorboards.
Another option
I encountered a couple riding around the North East in a situation not unlike yours, though I suspect a more advanced situation. They were on a Goldwing with a sidecar. There was a big smile on her face and they were having the time of their lives!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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My wife also has MS. We've only had the LT one season, but I can tell you she is much more comfortable on it than she was on my Buell. I've added the adjustable floorboards and the Muddman armrests in an effort to make her more comfortable, but she still tires fairly easily. I haven't been able to convince her to have a little nap on the back yet, but time will tell whether it becomes an option.
We have turned around and come home a few times when she has gotten too tired. I try to let her know up front exactly where we are going, how long we will be out, and let her know we can stop for a break whenever she wants.If she isn't up to a particular ride on any given day, we just find a shorter ride to go on. I always try to find a place to go that she will find interesting and make sure I have a shorter route home than the "nice" ride route to get there.
The fact that she makes the effort to get up and out with me means a lot. Who knows how long she will be able to ride so we try to make the best of it while we can. I don't think any cross country trips are in the future, but we get to spend time together going places we wouldn't bother driving to in the car.
Good luck and make the best of your time together.
 

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My wife has lots of medical problems also. But they seem to dissapear when shes on the bike. One time she rode 10 hours with a broken leg from deal gap to St Augustine Florida. Feel in a hole at Fontana damn. You may be supprised. good luck , Floor boards and arm rest got to have them.
 

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A good quality sheepskin seat cover may aid in your wife's comfort by relieving pressure points (my wife really likes hers). My wife has a tendency to fall asleep so I installed Muddiman armrests with a "seat belt" modification to keep her centered and prevent her from slumping sideways or forward. The belt is hooked to the armrests and goes across her upper diaphragm. We are also going to try something similar to an inflatable "neck pillow" like the ones you see people using on long plane trips to keep her helmet (and her head) in an upright, forward-looking position so she can sleep without her head drifting from side-to-side or falling forward and banging into my helmet.

If sleep would help your wife's fatigue while riding, these suggestions could enhance her enjoyment if she gets to the point of being comfortable enough to sleep while riding.
 

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Just a thought, maybe a side car would be a good alternative.
 

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The last time my wife fell asleep, I slammed on the brakes and screamed like a little school girl. She hasn't slept since. And my shoulders are healing fine, thank you. :histerica
 

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My wife tried the floor boards did not like as the trapped my legs in certain conditions but the armrests are a must.
She sleeps all the time - I mean all the time and I highly recommend the Mudman arm rests.

Regarding the armrests: I have had the wonderful occasion to have dropped (0 mph) the bike twice with her on the back
and each time I said to her, on the intercom, step off up go the arm rests and she just steps off and then proceeds
to direct traffic while I wrestle with the whale!! No problem for us.

As others have mentioned a comm system for music, GPS, phone and talking to each other is a must. But I also feel
from my experience that you need in ear monitors to really isolate you and your wife between the outside world.
It will totally change the entire riding experience - totally!!! Noise is fatiguing and distracting and you need to
seal out those noises that do not improve your life. Speakers in the helmet work but they do not seal your ears . . .

Rant off!
 
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