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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Everyone.

Well it was bound to happen. Rear master cylinder OEM brake line blew.

Called various BMW dealers and no one had any Speiglers in stock and the prices were running $245 for the clear covered lines and aluminum fittings and $275 for colored lines and colored fittings.

Also, the price for the dealer to remove, install Speigler SS lines was running close to $900 here in Houston. And not much less if I brought in "The Beast" naked!

Decided pretty quickly that I would do it myself.

Called Spiegler and their rep referred me to Sportbiketrackgear.com. The rep said that I could get the best deal at Sportbiketrackgear.com price wise and probably should get the colored lines and colored fittings at or around $245.

Well much to my surprise, I got the colored lines and colored fittings for $234.95. and free shipping!

And the real deal came when I received my lines and I opened the box!
I also received brand spanking new colored Banjo Bolts for every connection in with the lines and other fittings. All for $234.95. They are bolt heads and not the Hex Head Banjo bolts as the OEM banjo bolts are HEX head.

Thank you Sportbiketrackgear.com.

If any of you are in need of new lines...I would call em up and order.

have a great day

Karl
 

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Old Slow Guy in A Fast Car
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Karl Did you get the new "T" block for the front lines. Lately a few people have gotten new bolts but not the "T" block. The LT kit should NOT have new bolts but should have the "T" block.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Stevie,

Yes I did. Bolts, washers, T-Block plastic tools...which I didn't need but who knows maybe find a use for them some day.

Guess it was my lucky day....on the bolts and having the T-Block which should be standard in the package.
 

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So just how difficult is it to replace all the lines and flush the system? I am putting this on the list of things to this winter... on a scale of one 2 ten.. ten being most difficult.
 

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So just how difficult is it to replace all the lines and flush the system? I am putting this on the list of things to this winter... on a scale of one 2 ten.. ten being most difficult.
It could be a 12 or higher. But take your time, read the documentation available on this site and ask for help and it lower's it dramatically. For me, the hardest part was the bleed (not flush) after installing a line. But following tips offered here, I got it going and then it was just time. Oh and I've got no special mechanical skills, I just read how to do it and then give it a shot.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I will be bleeding today.

Replacing the lines were not a big deal at all. Mainly because I had already removed everything...including gas tank..because of other work I was doing on the bike.

These areas are a pain in the buttocks:

1. Upper banjo bolt on the rear master cylinder line. That banjo bolt is located to the right of the rear shock's upper bolt and a little bit behind the frame member. It is mounted to a thin piece of metal that can flex a bit to help it clear the frame member to get the hex tool on it. Pretty easy to remove. A bit tougher to mount the banjo bolt when replacing. Just not enough room for my big fingers. So to make it easier, just remove the rear shock bolts and slide the shock down until you have more room to reattach the line and screw in the banjo bolt.

2. The Front Master Cylinder Line connector and the Front ABS line from the Front Calipers banjo bolt connector. They are both up under the nose cone tupperware. Northern Illinois BMW club video on changing out the lines tell us to remove the front section of the air horn to the air filter box. That helps, but still has you having to drop down and a hard angle to see the connections. Since I had the gas tank off, I also removed the rear piece of the air horn. This opened up that area from the right side at the same height as the connections. I could easily see the connectors and have plenty of room to wrench apart the connections.

3. The next tricky area is the Front Wheel reservoir brake line. And it is not really tricky, you just have to remove part of the hand grip and the upper handlebar cover to get at the brake line and the banjo bolt. You have to remove part of the handgrip to get access to the lock down screw that prevent the reservoir etal from rotating. But you need to rotate it to get the banjo bolt clear of the handlebar for removal and replacement.
And you need to cover your bike with plastic to keep any spilled brake fluid from getting on exposed areas of the bike.

Remember also that on each banjo bolt connection, there is a protruding metal tab to keep the banjo hose fitting from rotating. The metal brake like tube at the banjo fitting, needs to be mounted on the counter clockwise side of the tab. This keep the brake line from rotating and also allows you to torque the connection.

As to bleeding, I will use the Phoenix V-5 system and reverse flush the ABS control module circuits, but reverse flushing at F3 and R3. On my LT these are the 2 long metal tubes that are horizontal. On the 2005 models up, these are called tall bleeders and are now vertical.

I will push fluid from these bleeders through the ABS up to the Front and Rear Reservoirs until I no longer have bubbles of air showing in the lines. This is for the control circuits.

For the wheel circuits, I will push fluid up from the calipers to the reservoirs.

Remember that the handlebar reservoir only services the Front ABS control circuit.

And that the Rear reservoir services both the Wheel circuit and the ABS control circuit, but the two circuits are still independent of each other.

Remember also remove brake fluid from the reservoirs as you push fluid into each system circuit.

Once you are certain that you no longer have air in the system you are good to go and test ride, which will clear the on-dash warning lights if all is well. As to any fault codes that have been thrown in to memory, well if you have a GS-911 tool you can clear the codes or take it to a dealer and pay to have a bleed test performed and any codes cleared.

Jut remember that any remaining codes of low pressure and/or low fluid levels after replacing fluid and bleeding will not prevent the ABS from functioning correctly. Everything will work fine.

I have to acknowledge Jzeiler for all his help in getting me to where I now understand what to do , how to do it and why...and the Northern Illinois BMW club president for his valuable video on replacing the brake lines! thank you all
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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If you have a GS-911 available it also does the bleed test and the iABS system is self clearing once any fault is corrected.

Thanks Karl, for the great write up of the procedure and what you encountered. I am sure it will help others.
 

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Just to add another tip, TAKE PHOTO"S of each connection before you undo them, then you've got direct reference to how they were originally attached before you forget which was which way.
Trickiest one we found was getting the twist around the top of the footbrake master cylinder the right way... since you are fitting it with the whole unit flipped over from normal position it seems to be twisted around the fixed line. Even with a photo, in the end I had to apply some reverse logic to think how it would fit when in normal position.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I also took photos to help with positioning...Used liquid White out also on some fittings too.

A question that I have....is....What is the purpose of the rear reservoir hose twist around the rear master cylinder hose. It that to protect the rear reservoir hose from being abraded by the driver foot plate cover where the master cylinder is mounted? Or is there another reason?

Thank
Karl

And Thanks John!
 

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A question that I have....is....What is the purpose of the rear reservoir hose twist around the rear master cylinder hose. It that to protect the rear reservoir hose from being abraded by the driver foot plate cover where the master cylinder is mounted?
In normal position I don't believe it is twisted around it, it just gets that way when we flop the footplate to work on it. That's what I meant by using reverse logic to figure out its real position.... At least that's my excuse :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I still just wonder if it makes any difference...As long as the reservoir hose is not being pinched or kinked to make it collapse....is it really that important...because there is not anything immediately behind the cover plate where the hoses come out the top to rub on either hose.

I need enlightenment! or at least a candle! lol
 

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Karl - Thanks for the Speigler source and write up. I just ordered my kit and V5 reverse bleeder for this winter's teardown and maintenance.
 

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If you have a GS-911 available it also does the bleed test and the iABS system is self clearing once any fault is corrected.QUOTE]

I have read and re-read the many posts and write-ups on bleeding Integral ABS brakes before I start the brake line replacement. My bike is a 2003 so that is the early Integral ABS generation. I've read that after bleeding it should be tested either by the dealer on a MoDiTeC or on a GS-911. The closest dealer is 100 miles away so that's out. I don't have a GS-911 so my question is do I really need to do the GS-911 bleed test, or if I do a good bleed to get all the air out and all faults clear can I say I'm done?
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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Bottom line is if you have no warning lights after you complete the bleed and the brakes feel good you are OK. The bleed test is just a sanity check. If you have air in the system to any great extent it will throw a fault. I had been flushing for 7 years before the 911 had the ability to do the check. Never had it fail since either even after brake line replacement.
 
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Thanks, John. That's what I thought but wanted to be sure.
 

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John,

I can be a bit thick headed at times, and I want to ensure I correctly understand clearing an ABS fault indication. The fault indication will clear itself automatically without a GS-911 or dealer reset if the ABS problem was successfully corrected? I was under the impression once a fault indication was tripped, it required a dealer or GS-911 reset to clear it.

Rob, 2000LT
Navarre, FL
 

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John,

I can be a bit thick headed at times, and I want to ensure I correctly understand clearing an ABS fault indication. The fault indication will clear itself automatically without a GS-911 or dealer reset if the ABS problem was successfully corrected? I was under the impression once a fault indication was tripped, it required a dealer or GS-911 reset to clear it.

Rob, 2000LT
Navarre, FL
It depends on year of K1200LT as they have very different ABS unit (2 types).

A fault will clear on every ignition ON (just before ABS diag sequence) ONLY for models equipped with IABS (ABS with servos). For the USA market, this includes all 2002-2009 and some late 2001 models.

For earlier K1200 equipped with ABSII unit (also called ABS2), faults will need to be cleared from ABS unit once cause is fixed as it stays in a static memory. This can be done either by: (1) dealers computer (2) GS911 (3) a manual method using Pin 21 on ABS connector.
 

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So over the holidays I tore the bike down to replace fluids, O2 sensor and brake lines. The Speigler brake lines are installed and yesterday I reverse bled the wheel and control circuits until all fluids looked clear and bubble free. However, there is still no pedal / lever resistance so I know I'm not done with bleeding. Next I will forward bleed, hopefully pumping out the remaining air especially from the control circuits. I'll use the servo pumps for the wheel circuits that worked well for me last time I flushed. Any thoughts from those who've gone down this path?

Thanks, Jim
 

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Replaced my lines this year too. Lever was the easiest, fluid just ran down and out. Wheel circuits are easy because of the pump. Keep an eye on that reservoir or funnel! The pedal control circuit took a few attempts both forward and reverse and forward reverse again. Bleeder bag makes everything much easier.
 

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So over the holidays I tore the bike down to replace fluids, O2 sensor and brake lines. The Speigler brake lines are installed and yesterday I reverse bled the wheel and control circuits until all fluids looked clear and bubble free. However, there is still no pedal / lever resistance so I know I'm not done with bleeding. Next I will forward bleed, hopefully pumping out the remaining air especially from the control circuits. I'll use the servo pumps for the wheel circuits that worked well for me last time I flushed. Any thoughts from those who've gone down this path?

Thanks, Jim
Jim - Just replaced mine and bled the system. I didn't reverse bleed anything - I don't have the tool for that. I did use a Speedbleeder bag and kept the bag elevated. Bled the control circuits by going through the 1-2-3-1 bleeder sequence. Then moved on to the wheel circuits. Again keeping the bleeder bag elevated so the air bubbles go up into the bag instead of sitting at the bleeder. I did bleed the wheel circuits without the servos first to get the majority of air out. The I used the servos to pump though plenty of brake fluid (required a second trip to the auto parts store since I ran out :rolleyes: ).

I have access to a GS-911. Hooked that up and ran though the ABS test and it passed.

Hope this helps. Good luck.
 
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