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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I slip my clutch a lot in parking lots and sharp turns to stay upright, I read on this forum that slipping the clutch burns the clutch up fast. I cannot afford to have to replace the clutch, but I do not want to fall either. What do you guys think?
 

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Race it. Break it. Fix it. Polish it. Show it. Repeat.

(Wait, that was Corvettes....well, most of it applies here.)
 

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yes, dear, slipping the clutch on a bike is OK.
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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shotgun said:
I slip my clutch a lot in parking lots and sharp turns to stay upright, I read on this forum that slipping the clutch burns the clutch up fast. I cannot afford to have to replace the clutch, but I do not want to fall either. What do you guys think?
Depends. If you are @2,500 rpm slipping the clutch - alot. It is not going to last long. But normal parking lot manuvers are OK. I really don't seem to ever need to slip it at all, maybe on a sharp U turn but usually I just manage the energy with the throttle and brakes. I lean the bike over in the space and pull it back up with the throttle. Try it out some time with lots of space no need to slip at all. Gradualy work up to a sharper drop but start out shallow and maintain control with the throttle. Lean in - pull up. Once you master it you will be amazed.
 

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Or get a GS and practice. I have seen a GS rider go through the State Police Iron Cross pattern at 1/4 the speed of a Harley, and ever touch a cone. I thought the guy was almost doing square corners. He stood on the pegs the whole way. You could almost see him thinking how easy it was on flat asphalt compared to sand or rocks.

More to the point, burning up the clutch has to do with friction, and the more RPM times the more time that the clutch is working in the friction zone is the key.

So might a leak in the clutch hydraulics and other things contribute to heating up and shredding the clutch.

But unless you spend an inordinate amount of time in parking lots, the gain in stability that you get from keeping the RPMs high will never hurt it. It make the bike more stable and give you power if needed to move out of the way.

If you want to give slow speed maneuvers a whirl, get an H-D with old, simple technology and a wet clutch.

Now, how to keep of the front break on a linked breaking system. Let's see how many different side the LT's linked brakes have.
 

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2 things - when the bike is rolling and in first gear, with the clutch disengaged, the differential speed (rpm) between the pressure plate and friction plate is much less than when the bike is stationary, so slipping the clutch is not quite as big a deal in this situation as long as you continue to keep the engine revs as low as possible. You are also dealing with less acceleration forces when not starting off from a standstill. But the main thing is to gain confidence in the engine and the fact that it will idle quite smoothly and not easily stall or just cut out. Move your weight to the outside of the turn to keep the centre of gravity running downwards through the centre of the bike. Go out and buy a trials technique dvd if you feel inclined, the principle for tight turns is very well explained and demonstrated. The golden rule is, you should never fall inwards when executing a sharp turn if your body weight is correctly positioned. Hope this helps.
 
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