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As I have my bike tore down for new shocks, I’m going ahead with the slave cylinder drilling. I have the bike almost completely torn down all I like is the dive shaft housing. My question is, there looks like a gasket on the slave cylinder cover. Will I need a new gasket or can the old normally be reused.

Thanks Mickey.
 

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FWIW when I removed the slave cylinder for the same reason, I was able to remove the gasket in tact and plan to reuse it.
 

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When I did mine, I had already preordered the seals and gaskets so I replaced everything.

I was always unsure why you need a gasket on the slave when we are drilling a hole in the cavity the gasket is sealing :confused:

I can't imagine it does much, but, for the couple of bucks, I'd sure replace it.
 

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Reading on another BMW website

Another way get the get the same effect of a weep hole is cut a slot out of the bottom of the gasket to get it to drain, so a new gasket it NOT necessary. What difference does it make if weeps out of the hole or the gasket? None. The gasket is there to keep the oil in, we all want it to drain in case the slave cylinder leaks. Make sense?
 

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suzbmwhnd said:
Another way get the get the same effect of a weep hole is cut a slot out of the bottom of the gasket to get it to drain, so a new gasket it NOT necessary. What difference does it make if weeps out of the hole or the gasket? None. The gasket is there to keep the oil in, we all want it to drain in case the slave cylinder leaks. Make sense?
I thought of doing that a few years ago when I did my drain hole drilling, but realized that when the slave seal goes it can pump fluid out into the cavity pretty rapidly, so I drilled a 5/32" hole close to the nose of the cylinder to allow the fluid to escape pretty quickly. The gasket is too thin, even if the whole bottom section of the gasket is cut away it will not allow fast escape of brake fluid. It is way back from the nose of the cylinder also, and where the taper of the cylinder nose causes it to be fairly close to the housing bore, further slowing escape of fluid.
 

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dshealey said:
I thought of doing that a few years ago when I did my drain hole drilling, but realized that when the slave seal goes it can pump fluid out into the cavity pretty rapidly, so I drilled a 5/32" hole close to the nose of the cylinder to allow the fluid to escape pretty quickly. The gasket is too thin, even if the whole bottom section of the gasket is cut away it will not allow fast escape of brake fluid. It is way back from the nose of the cylinder also, and where the taper of the cylinder nose causes it to be fairly close to the housing bore, further slowing escape of fluid.

Plus, IMNSHO, if you invested all the time getting there, go 100% :dance:
 

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Slave Gasket

What is the purpose of the gasket, to hold the fluid in so it will be sure to run down the shaft and drip onto your clutch?........... :histerica
 

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dshealey said:
I thought of doing that a few years ago when I did my drain hole drilling, but realized that when the slave seal goes it can pump fluid out into the cavity pretty rapidly, so I drilled a 5/32" hole close to the nose of the cylinder to allow the fluid to escape pretty quickly. The gasket is too thin, even if the whole bottom section of the gasket is cut away it will not allow fast escape of brake fluid. It is way back from the nose of the cylinder also, and where the taper of the cylinder nose causes it to be fairly close to the housing bore, further slowing escape of fluid.


I fully agree with David. And I honestly do not believe there is ANY problem with reusing that particular gasket if needed. It really doesn't seal anything of importance. I would say that the best thing that gasket accomplishes is preventing surface to surface (metal to metal) contact between the Slave and the boss. If the old one is in good shape you can reuse it without any negative consequences. Normally you replace all gaskets as a part of a good repair. This one is a bit different.
 

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When I replaced my slave cylinder I also replaced the gasket. However, after actually completing the job I realized it wasn't necessary. Re-using the old gasket is fine as well as just making yourself a gasket from ordinary gasket material you can pick up at NAPA.

Good Luck,
Kevin
 

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Funny, I just got off the with my local dealer (Cyclewerks) And the head mec, said the weep hole would not save the clutch. I find that hard to believe.
 

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OU812 said:
Funny, I just got off the with my local dealer (Cyclewerks) And the head mec, said the weep hole would not save the clutch. I find that hard to believe.

It may or may not, depending on several factors (i.e. - How bad is the leak? How quick do I detect the leak? etc.) But, one thing is for SURE...not having the hole will SURELY kill the clutch if the Slave or Input Shaft Seals leak!!! That's 100% certain. The Drain Hole is not a cure-all, but it is a very effective way of getting some advance warning that a leak is going on and giving you time to fix it BEFORE it surely ruins the clutch.
 

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I called Chicago BMW, and they said that if they were to drill a hole in the slave, and the BMW rep found out, well it would not be good for the dealer. :eek:
 

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That may very well be, as some dealers will do it and some won't. Some claim to have never heard of it. It was developed and implemented by david Shealey (on this site), unless I am mistaken. If I had an LT, I would drill mine, for sure, right as my warranty expired.
 

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What if all is found clean & dry?

I'm getting ready to do the weep hole drilling in my '99 LT with 47k miles. I have the new slave cylinder, seals, etc on order in case it's found to be leaking.

What if everything is found sealed and dry? Would you replace the slave cylinder just on the basis of the mileage or leave everthing alone and just depend on the new weephole to tip you if it fails and hope it doesn't?

I'm thinking about that phenomenon called "maintenance induced failure" and would hate to be a case study in it!

Thanks.

Joe
 

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At 47k and the age of the Slave being at least 10 years old, I would change it without a doubt. Don't let anybody tell you different...just change it! And change the Tranny Input shaft seal (output side) while you are in there. Anyone think different?
 

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I'll do that Jack. Thinking it through again, I probably don't want to tear the bike down twice so I'll do it all the first time.

What is the prognosis on new slave cylinders and seals? Do they seem to be more robust than the originals?

Thanks for your input, and have a great day.
 

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I'd say the prognosis on a new slave cylinder is not great but probably better than your old one. The reason I say this is that the 2005 models seemed to have an above normal failure rate early in their life. However, your slave cylinder is definitely in the range for a recommended replacement. I'd suggest drilling the weep hole, putting in a new slave cylinder and hoping for the best.

Good Luck,
Kevin
 

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EncoreJoe said:
Do they seem to be more robust than the originals?
I believe that the slave cylinders have been redesigned sometime during 2002. There is a posting here somewhere that shows them side by side.
 
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