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Discussion Starter #1
Hey All,

I took the '05 LT last weekend through some nice twisties to Blairsville and Dahlonega GA.

Not sure if anyone has been there.

On some of the twisties, especially on the left side, when bike is leaning, I ocassionally drag the side stand.

Not sure if anyone has experienced this, but I am always hesitant to leaning sharp.

Any ideas on how to address this?
 

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I get it a bit on aggressive left turns and as mentioned above, notsomuch after tweaking the load a bit.
 

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Old Slow Guy in A Fast Car
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ehaughn said:
Hey All,

I took the '05 LT last weekend through some nice twisties to Blairsville and Dahlonega GA.

Not sure if anyone has been there.

On some of the twisties, especially on the left side, when bike is leaning, I ocassionally drag the side stand.

Not sure if anyone has experienced this, but I am always hesitant to leaning sharp.

Any ideas on how to address this?
Yep I drag mine all the time.
First question is do you have the "Stock" shocks on the bike?
If so ,How many miles on the bike?
If over 30,000 , Time for new shocks.
I did refill the "Preload" adjuster that's under the seat and was able to stiffen the ride so that it will not drag as much.
CLICKY CLICK here to see how to do it :D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have to check the damper setting, but I think it is at the lowest as I probably forget to set it back.

Bike has 22k on it.

It has the stock shocks.
 

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Are you sure it is the side stand dragging? My centerstand is what scrapes in turns on my '07 when loaded for long trips.
 

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You think that's fun, wait till you jack the rear end off the ground with the centerstand while in a corner.

It is not you side stand, but your centerstand dragging. All the above about shocks is good and you can also cut the rubber bumpers off where they keep the stand from hitting the frame. Take a bit more than half. You'll eventually grind the centerstand foot down to where it looks like a triangle.



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Ride at night. Your riding buddies will enjoy the light show. :D
 

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Old Slow Guy in A Fast Car
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cccpastorjack said:
Dang....I was gonna tell him to lean to the RIGHT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Jack ... Maybe he's a Nascar fan. You know floor it in the straights then turn left. Repeat ,Repeat, Repeat, Repeat :histerica
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Altough I like sparks and fireworks, but I can wait until July 4th to see them.

It is definitely the side stand. It is the part the touches that ground when side stand is down.

I see a where the paint was removed.

I will try to the shock thing.
 

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You'll want to practice this in light traffic & lower speeds at first. Posture is important. Balls of feet on pegs, body relaxed, slight forward lean (pretend you're a shortstop and the pitcher is winding up).
For a left hand curve, glide left so your right butt cheek is on the left half of the saddle, let your left knee ease away from the side of the bike. For a right turn, glide right so your left butt cheek is on the right half of the saddle, let your right knee ease away from the side of the bike.
This allows you to get more turn with less bike lean. Make no sudden or jerky moves. Glide by using your thigh muscles to lift you slightly (not off the seat), with virtually no weight on the seat. Foot positioning and leg strength are critical. Over a long stretch your quads will feel it, but it is how racers keep speed through curves and prevent low siding. Unless you have knee pucks, don't allow your knee to drag, it'll ruin a pair of riding pants real quick. (Not sure you can drag a knee on an LT, I've never done it but I've only had it for 2 years.)

If you don't do ATGATT, don't employ this technique.
 

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grifscoots said:
You think that's fun, wait till you jack the rear end off the ground with the centerstand while in a corner.

It is not you side stand, but your centerstand dragging. All the above about shocks is good and you can also cut the rubber bumpers off where they keep the stand from hitting the frame. Take a bit more than half. You'll eventually grind the centerstand foot down to where it looks like a triangle.
I did that a year ago with 46K on the stock shocks, low-sided, took the bike to the shop for some tupperware replacement and new Ohlins! Man are those shocks SWEEEEET :D

REPLACE YOUR SHOCKS, you'll be glad you did!
 

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BennyBob said:
You'll want to practice this in light traffic & lower speeds at first. Posture is important. Balls of feet on pegs, body relaxed, slight forward lean (pretend you're a shortstop and the pitcher is winding up).
For a left hand curve, glide left so your right butt cheek is on the left half of the saddle, let your left knee ease away from the side of the bike. For a right turn, glide right so your left butt cheek is on the right half of the saddle, let your right knee ease away from the side of the bike.
This allows you to get more turn with less bike lean. Make no sudden or jerky moves. Glide by using your thigh muscles to lift you slightly (not off the seat), with virtually no weight on the seat. Foot positioning and leg strength are critical. Over a long stretch your quads will feel it, but it is how racers keep speed through curves and prevent low siding. Unless you have knee pucks, don't allow your knee to drag, it'll ruin a pair of riding pants real quick. (Not sure you can drag a knee on an LT, I've never done it but I've only had it for 2 years.)

If you don't do ATGATT, don't employ this technique.
A good example of what Benny is describing is shown in a video in Mike's blog here. Click on the ride titled "Cheoah River Mother's Day - TL1000". And btw, sure shows how smooth Mike is (assuming that's him on the LT!!).
 

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No one mentioned this but there are a few mechanical reasons for sparking:

1. What gear were / are you in when you start to spark?
2. How much do you weigh and was the bike loaded?
3. What tires and pressures are you running?
4. Conditions of springs, then shocks and your settings?

It may come down to the gear you are in! If you are in first gear thats a good thing as you appear to be riding the bike at its limits . . . you are fearless and you have the skills and desire to push the bike harder than I care to do. Recommendations to provide extra clearances, shocks and tires should be in order.

If however you are in a higher gear the reason for the big lean angle is you are in too high of a gear and need to comensate with lean in order to complete the curve.

Was riding in North Carolina a few weeks ago at the STC and once again was reminded that the bike will run 60 to 65 mph in first gear. Whenever I go into a corner too hot I just downshifted and reduced the need to lean!!

At the 2009 STC (Spring Training Camp) there was about 20 of us that listened to Susan Galpin give instructions on how to quick ride and one of the main components is RPM's. Susan gave lessons on Saturday is was very revealing on how the bike RPM's have everything to do with lean angle and speed thru a corner . . . one other benefit is not requring brakes - unless you "come to a stop sign" that is a quote from Susan!!

Just my 2 cents . . . :D
 

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You're only dragging on one side? I get'em both when I'm riding two up. Ohlin shocks in full press and quite the spark show on the Dragon. Ain't that right Pastor Jack? :D
 

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In hard corners with two up I can drag the side stand on the left side. Not really a problem, because it doesn't straigten you up it just scrapes. However, on hard right turns with two up I can and do scrape the center stand and that is a lot less fun because it seems to dig in more. I have Ohlin shocks and now that i"ve tweaked the rear for both stiffness and compression it happens a lot less and the bike is much less likely to wobble in high speed sweeping turns, too.
 
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