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Discussion Starter #1
So with any luck, I may be relocating to the UK in a year or so for a 2-3 year stint (maybe more?)

Does anybody have experience with shipping an RT via air? I've read through several shipping company websites and most of them recommend/require the removal of the front wheel and windscreen to minimize the container size.

Removing the windscreen is simple enough, but pulling the front wheel seems to be a bit of a bother, especially putting it back on at the destination end?

Just curious/planning ahead...
 

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Visit your local BMW bike dealer. They may have a crate for you that fits your bike model. Free if you ask nicely.
 

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FWIW the RT ships from BMW with front wheel, windshield and bag covers removed to achieve a more reasonable shipping size.

Hope this helps.

Aloha.
 

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I'm sure if you pay a dealer enough, they will crate the bike up for you in one of their 'empties'

Welcome to the UK...at least you'll be used to rain coming from Washington :)
 

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I once was shipping used horbly davidsons to the UK and never took off a wheel. The added work did not make the savings worth the effort and inconvenience. You are supposed to remove all oils and gas but most shippers, (I dealt with 3 or 4) allow a minimum of gas, leave all oils in and disconnect the battery. I flew with my BMW once to the UK out of Canukistan and it was ride onto a metal plate, drain most of the gas, disconnect the battery and they did the rest. After arrival, ride off to the nearest petrol station.

I would do it all myself before paying someone else. Call the freight service of different airlines and ask them cost and details. If you cannot travel with the bike ask about temporary storage at the other end. You will find that the airlines all charge about the same but you might be able to bargain. I talked to one rider who got a really cheap rate when El Al began their freighter service from Amsterdam to New York and wanted to fill the hold. Depending on where you will fly out of you might check with Emerates, Qatar, and Singapore and any discount airlines and keep your destination airport choice open. If you are flying with the bike you will have more choices.

They all advise wrapping the bike and removing all valuables. I never did and I loaded lots of extra parts on the pallets (free from the HD dealers), such as extra motors, transmissions, etc. I never lost anything but suit yourself. I strapped the hogs with four straps and let it fly. Never had one fall over. All the guys at the different loading docks were interested in the bikes and were eager to help. I would show up with the bike and pallet separate in the truck or the bike already loaded and they would lift it out with a forklift. I was never charged extra money for anything, it is all in the freight cost which is calculated just like a UPS package, dimensions and weight. I have no idea what freight costs are now but if you are near an airport served by jets, not necessarily an international airport, and fly with the bike, this will be easy.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
slipknot said:
I once was shipping used horbly davidsons to the UK and never took off a wheel.
Thanks for the info. I've noted on a couple shipping sites that going out of Canada is much cheaper (by up to $1,000) and that on Air Canada they have a specific program to fly with your bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Miggs said:
Welcome to the UK...at least you'll be used to rain coming from Washington :)
Thanks! I've spent a fair bit of time in Blighty and actually looking forward to "coming home".
 

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Vancouver BC Airport is easy to deal with and close. I use it rather than Seattle when going to Europe.
 

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Of course, If you're not in any hurry, sea freight will be a lot cheaper and allow you to leave it as is?
 

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four12 said:
That is a cool video. Dealers should show that to help people understand the "dealer prep" charges.
Nothing cool about it.
Unless I am mistaken, they disregarded the first rule of professionals.
If the manual says that bolts are suppose to be tighten to a given torque, then that implies that you use a "torque wrench" and not just simply a retched spanner.
Specific in safety related parts like axle and brakes.
 

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Alfred02 said:
Nothing cool about it.
Unless I am mistaken, they disregarded the first rule of professionals.
If the manual says that bolts are suppose to be tighten to a given torque, then that implies that you use a "torque wrench" and not just simply a retched spanner.
Specific in safety related parts like axle and brakes.
Guess you didn't read BMWOM's explanation of why no torqueing during the video. ;)
 

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Dick said:
Guess you didn't read BMWOM's explanation of why no torqueing during the video. ;)
I didn't either.
Went full screen on the video and never saw the comment below. :brick:
 

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I'd still say not "professional".

"We didn't want to make the video any longer than it could be." is BS. Video is sped up anyway, another second or two is insignificant.

Re-torquing as part of pre-delivery inspection is inefficient, will not fix damage caused by improper torquing and opens the possibility that under torqued bolts will be missed. An inspection is a verification that everything is correct, not the time to do work that should have already been completed.

"If you do not have time to do it right the first time, when will you have time to do it over?"

Sorry to the OP for sliding off topic...
 

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Discussion Starter #16
beech said:
Vancouver BC Airport is easy to deal with and close. I use it rather than Seattle when going to Europe.
I've already managed to lose the bookmark, but there was a company that had a shipping package out of Vancouver for about $1K less than anywhere else in the states and had a deal with Air Canada that you flew on the same plane as your bike.

That would be very cool. Get off the plane, clear customs, go to the freight office, pick up your bike and ride away.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Miggs said:
Of course, If you're not in any hurry, sea freight will be a lot cheaper and allow you to leave it as is?
Sea shipping would be less, but also much, much slower, especially from the West Coast of the US. I'd rather pay the extra money and not be bikeless for several months. :)
 

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FWIW, removal of the front tire is not all that difficult. You could pack the necessary tools in the crate with the bike. I've taken mine off a couple of times and, at the most, it takes 15 minutes.

Removal is in the owners manual. I've got a list of needed tools if you'd like it.

DC
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Casey said:
FWIW, removal of the front tire is not all that difficult. You could pack the necessary tools in the crate with the bike. I've taken mine off a couple of times and, at the most, it takes 15 minutes.

Removal is in the owners manual. I've got a list of needed tools if you'd like it.

DC
Thanks for that info. If it does come down to having to remove the tire, I'll definitely practice it in the garage a few times!
 
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