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Nan & I were diving off Venice Beach, Fl., Sunday and found these teeth about a mile from shore, in about 30 feet of water. There is something almost magical about finding Megalodon shark’s teeth that are several million years old and in such great condition. The visibility was around 5-10 feet and the water was 87 degrees. Unfortunately there was a thin layer of silt on the bottom and that made it really difficult to find the teeth. On the first dive none were found. Nan and I found what is in the picture on the second dive.

The two larger teeth were found 3 years ago on the same spot. The coin is a silver dollar that used to belong to my mom.
 

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Thanks for sharing, Dan. That's really neat
 

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It's when you find white teeth that you really should not go into the water.
And you are gonna need a bigger boat.
 

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What is the theory behind the abundance of these shark's teeth in the Venice area? Wife and kids and I were able to visit there while vacationing in Siesta Key back in December 1994 and found a few with help a local resident.
 

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The teeth were on the surface, under a very fine layer of sediment. In years past, we rarely saw the sediment and they were a lot easier to find. We would work in a small area and hand fan the bottom letting the current sweep the silt downstream.

Lots of the small teeth are found in the shallow area. Some people fill up cans of them. We prefer to dive in the deeper area for the larger ones that seem to accumulate.

I've heard lots of stories about why here, but the most likely is that where we dive, it was once an ancient river bed. The teeth are suspended in a layer of clay and gradually get pushed to the surface.

Anyone who is a licensed diver can go on the same boat that we did and they will try to drop you in the most likely ares for teeth. They chard $80 a diver and that included the air and weights. We generally do it several times a year and have more than enough teeth. We just enjoy the relaxing dive..
 

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Not in a normal sense. Two days a week though, I play a safety diver at The Florida Aquarium in Tampa and several times a year, through state grants, we are working on a few civil war wrecks in the Tampa Bay area.

There is a freshwater spring in North Port Fl, where for the past 5-6 years, we have been excavating artifacts that are 12,000 year old. The spring is 230 foot deep. I have only worked the rim at about 40 feet. We do have divers going to the bottom, but most of the artifacts are at the first level, about 25-40 feet. The spring is shaped like an hourglass and a cross section can be seen if you Google Little Salt Spring. It's owned by the University of Miami and we work under their direction.
 
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