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Discussion Starter #1
Only had the Bus for 3 weeks

Not very comfortable about leaving it on the side stand as it has already rolled off once :mad: but I was lucky enough to be underneath it and did no damage :) .

Tomorrow I am putting it on the Eurotunnel train.

Would you leave it on the centre stand or (as the train manager suggests) put it on the side stand and leave it in gear butting the front wheel into the train kerb.

Help!!!
 

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In this case, I'd defer to the train manager. I would figure he has more experience with such things than I do.

For everyday use, I used the sidestand. I just make sure it's fully extended, and let the bike roll just enough in gear to take the slack out of the geartrain, and lock the steering full left.
 

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I've had good luck with the side stand. Technique is to leave the bike in gear and roll forward a bit before setting down on the stand. I haven't had a problem yet.

The center stand is more of a problem for me as I can't roll off while on the bike (can't reach the ground). I roll off while standing along side and I've had it go over on me far side.

I haven't had mine on a train or ferry, but I'd say whatever stand you use, the key is to make sure she can't roll forward.
 

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In your circumstances, I would leave it on the center stand. No question about it.. I have not had problems with the side stand recently, but with all the motion on a train, you never know what movement may occur or if there will be any tilting, etc.. Better safe then sorry for sure. I wouldn't trust the train manager only on this one. You are the one that owns the bike.. You are the one that would take the loss or be responsible if the beast fell on something else.

If it were me, no question. Center stand....

Good Luck
 

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a. I am sure there is a tie down system
b. If there isnt Have a spare rope to hand; tie the rope to the side stand (or center stand) and then to the front wheel. Make sure 100% you have rolled the bike forward before using the side stand (in gear of course) to get rid of the 'slack'. If there is anything on the left of the bike, tie the bike towards it (I use lorries when available, on ferries, but you have to get back to the bike sharpish on arrival!) I also use rubber door wedges front and back. Worked for my trip on the Isle of Weight ferry where they had no tie downs at all.
 

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The only thing I'd add to Jomas is to us a velcro strap on the brake lever - lock it, and the bike won't move. This is the routine I use on the ferries over here.

Enjoy the trip!
 

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bflemingor said:
The only thing I'd add to Jomas is to us a velcro strap on the brake lever - lock it, and the bike won't move. This is the routine I use on the ferries over here.

Enjoy the trip!
+1 with the brake lever. I would also take a small block of wood and wedge in front of the rear wheel. If you don't need it toss it in the trash.
 

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Lots of good suggestions...

in the posts above.

Here's mine:

For normal parking, park where it is level or uphill. Don't park where gravity will roll the bike forward. I come to a stop in first gear, put down the side stand (the bike shuts off), let out the clutch and roll forward to take up driveline slack, and then lean it over onto the sidestand.
(Don't forget to turn off the ignition key or you'll get a dead battery, DAHIK :)

For a train or ferry: if you have tie down points and you expect a bit of a rough ride, put the bike on the side stand in gear. Use one tie-down on the centerstand side of the bike and take up the slack in the tie-down. Use another tie-down on the other side of the bike and tension it so the bike's weight is pulled off the sidestand and the bike's suspension is compressed a little. Taking some weight off the sidestand where a rough ride is expected may prevent damage to the side stand.

If there are no tie-down points but you can park next to a rail, put the bike on the side stand in gear, and tie the bike to the rail.

For a rough ride the bike on the sidestand is less likely to damage things than having it on the centerstand where the center stand is taking all the bike's weight. A long bouncing ride with all the weight on the center stand just might break something. Using the sidestand puts more of the bike's weight on the suspension, the key is just to keep it from falling over, and minimizing risk of damage to the sidestand.

A bungee cord, velcro, or electrical tape on the front brake lever is a great idea regardless of the tie-down method.

Whether using the side stand or centerstand, running a line around the stand and through the front wheel to keep the bike from rolling off the stand is also a good idea.
 

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What would bother me is the usually jerky train motions, if it were mine and I couldn't tie it, I would lay it down on the bumper,(pad taped to the bumper). I know it sounds extreme, but if its down it can't fall. I had to leave mine out in a severe storm, I pulled it on the grass and layed it over. When it was over, I stood it back up and rode it home. No damage, no worries.
 

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Leaving it in gear when parked on the sidestand is always a good idea, regardless of location.
 

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DavidTaylor said:
Leaving it in gear when parked on the sidestand is always a good idea, regardless of location.
I hardly ever put my bike in neutral. Especially not at stop lights, since I talked to you on the phone almost five years ago! I think you were in a hospital bed, and I was at the Booze Brothers meet. I watch my mirrors like a hawk now!
 

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A few years ago, a friend and I trucked my R80RT and his Gold Wing on the centerstands with tie downs. The centerstand of both bikes were broken when we reached the destination. :eek: :eek: I now use tie downs but neither stand, and it has worked for me.
 

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Bad idea...

maxposner said:
What would bother me is the usually jerky train motions, if it were mine and I couldn't tie it, I would lay it down on the bumper,(pad taped to the bumper). I know it sounds extreme, but if its down it can't fall. I had to leave mine out in a severe storm, I pulled it on the grass and layed it over. When it was over, I stood it back up and rode it home. No damage, no worries.
The tip-over wings are designed to minimize damage in case of a tip over. They certainly aren't designed to take the kind of vibration and pounding that would result from a train or ferry ride. Sorry, but I consider intentionlly lying the bike down for the duration of the trip to be an extraordinarily bad idea.
 
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