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Adding a TireGard TPS to the LT. My valve stems are the short rubber ones. TireGard says to replace rubber stems with the metal ones.
A couple questions for you guys:

1) Is it possible to replace the valve stems without completely dismounting the tire??

2) Would leaving the original rubber stems on the tire be a safety issue??
 

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Old Slow Guy in A Fast Car
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1) Is it possible to replace the valve stems without completely dismounting the tire??
No The stem goes in from inside the tire

2) Would leaving the original rubber stems on the tire be a safety issue??
Some may disagree but I say it is a safety issue. The rubber can flex with the extra weight on them. Beside I ALWAYS replace ANY rubber stem with metal ones
 

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Metal!
 

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katnapinn said:
1) Is it possible to replace the valve stems without completely dismounting the tire??
No The stem goes in from inside the tire

2) Would leaving the original rubber stems on the tire be a safety issue??
Some may disagree but I say it is a safety issue. The rubber can flex with the extra weight on them. Beside I ALWAYS replace ANY rubber stem with metal ones
+1! Steve is right on the money here. I go with metal for the longevity and reliability. Never need to replace them, and they will not self destruct!

John
 

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We were almost killed by a cheap ass rubber 90degree valve stem..

Metal, Straight, Short...

Johnb
 

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The stem on the front wheel of the LT looks a bit more shrouded by the rim, do the typical metal stems (retaining nut on top) fit fine in there? Or is there a specific metal stem that works?
 

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I use Kurvy Girl stems... With these, I have had to make no alterations to the rim to accept the stem.

clicky

Light weight but tough... and I have not had one fail yet... for any reason...

You may be able to get these into the rim without removing the tire. Break the bead and compress the tire out of the way... remove the rubber stem and drop this one in...

I wouldn't do it that way but it might work... I carry two of these on the bike and in the event of a stem failure, that's how I would do it as a Shade Tree shoulder repair job...
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
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Metal of course, but you might be able to get them in by just breaking the bead. I have not tried it but these side walls are pretty stiff, if you have a tiny hand you just might pull it off.
 

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jzeiler said:
Metal of course, but you might be able to get them in by just breaking the bead. I have not tried it but these side walls are pretty stiff, if you have a tiny hand you just might pull it off.
Ditto... IIRC that's what I did when I first installed my metal valve stems years ago. It can be done, but a little bit of a pita. Break both beads, use a big C-clamp or something to push one side of the tire over to access the valve stem hole.
 

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I replaced mine with mettle steams from NAPA. I also did it with out completely dismounting the tire by using a piece of wood and a couple of C clamps. I have about 20K on them with no problem.
I had the rubber ones leak on me twice.
 

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JPSpen said:
We were almost killed by a cheap ass rubber 90degree valve stem..

Metal, Straight, Short...

Johnb
'Amen" to that! Our rubber 90-degree valve stem failed while we were OFF the bike, fortunately. This happened just a few weeks, IIRC, after John and Lindy had the accident he refers to. I replaced mine with metal valve stems. No problems since.
 

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To me, there is no good reason to use rubber valve stems on a motorcycle, period. Too many failures reported, metal ones pretty much solve this once and for all. At worst, a metal one may develop a leak over time as the rubber seals deteriorate. They sure won't blow the metal stem out of the rubber as we have seen so many reports of here.
 

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I added a TireGard to my GT 6,000 miles ago. I ran a SmarTire system on my LT, and have the factory TPM on my GT.

First, yes, do replace the rubber stems with metal. In fact, replace all rubber stems with metal, even if you don't add a TPM system. It's simply a safety issue.

Second, yes, this thing works very well, with a couple of usability caveats.

The pressure and temp readings seem to be pretty accurate, within 1/2 psi or so. Not bad at all. Replaceable watch batteries on the sender caps and an AAA battery on the controller are a good thing, and the price isn't bad if you shop around.

In fact, the replaceable batteries are why I went this route, even though my GT has the factory TPM. I've already replaced the factory wheel sensors once at great expense due to weak non-replaceable batteries, and the current set have pretty much died as well. The whole TireGard kit is roughly the cost of one BMW wheel sensor, plus I can easily swap the sensor caps to different wheels if I need to.

The sensor caps are light enough to not throw off the wheel balance, small enough to clear the brake calipers, and work very well.

The display head looks like a small alarm fob with a display. It reads the pressures easily, and shows temps with a simple button press. It also has a replaceable battery. You can set the alarm points for high pressure, low pressure, and high temp. The unit lights up, beeps, and vibrates for an alarm.

The weaknesses all lie in the display head. First, and most importantly, the display unit is not waterproof. Second, there is no permanent mounting option. Instead it has a small key ring and chain. But who could see the display or notice the alarms if it is dangling near your headstock, or stuck in your pocket? You could velcro mount the display somewhere, but again, not if it rains . . .

And third, there is a pic of a motorcycle on the screen, which is unnecessary. Dump the graphic and give me larger numbers instead. Maybe even pressure and temp readouts at the same time.

So if this unit had a better display, I'd give it a better rating. Still, it can provide valuable information that just may save you from suddenly being stranded by the side of the road, or worse . . .
 

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UncleMark said:
I use Kurvy Girl stems... With these, I have had to make no alterations to the rim to accept the stem.

clicky

Light weight but tough... and I have not had one fail yet... for any reason...

You may be able to get these into the rim without removing the tire. Break the bead and compress the tire out of the way... remove the rubber stem and drop this one in...

I wouldn't do it that way but it might work... I carry two of these on the bike and in the event of a stem failure, that's how I would do it as a Shade Tree shoulder repair job...
Me too! I used a dremmel and just smoothed that center lip on each side to accept the metal stems, 90 in the rear pointing left, short strait front.

They were provided with my Doran TPI.
 

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I don't think there's anything wrong with a good quality rubber valve stem,
BUT if the tire pressure monitor company specifies metal stems then that is the thing to do.
AND there is a long history of the BMW OEM valve stems being defective on some of these bikes.
I'll bet there are still bikes on the road with rubber BMW valve stems waiting to fail. And I wouldn't be surprised if some bad valve stems are still on the supply shelves of BMW parts departments and supply warehouses.
Change 'em out and don't get them from BMW; metal is a good choice IMO.

Now becoming ancient history:
http://www.bmwlt.net/ubbthreads/showthreaded.php?Cat=&Board=K1200LT&Number=266548&page=&view=&sb=&o=
 

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Me too! I used a dremmel and just smoothed that center lip on each side to accept the metal stems, 90 in the rear pointing left, short strait front.

They were provided with my Doran TPI.
I was looking at the Moto-D at 11.3 mm. (0.453") on Amazon.
They seem a bit pricey, but look great.
The site specifically says that they will not fit a K1200LT (2003-2009), so what to get?
 

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I can tell you that Harley metal stems from the parts dept at the Harley shop next to the BMW shop work fine and it only takes a few moments of getting rid of the ridge for them to work perfectly :). I think the BMW shop charged me 60 for both of them to be put on, I took in the wheels in. Most any bike shop that changes tires will do it for you. The last pair I had mounted before the LT were also about ten bucks from a bike shop and no worries, the little ridge sometimes doesn't even interfere.
 

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I was looking at the Moto-D at 11.3 mm. (0.453") on Amazon.
They seem a bit pricey, but look great.
The site specifically says that they will not fit a K1200LT (2003-2009), so what to get?
I have had these on my 05 for several years now. They work fine and I did no filing of either wheel or valve.
https://www.kurveygirl.com/shop/pro...ducts_id=71&osCsid=pbn8rj37hiljvdd2bjcn3aqcu5

The only issue I had was one in my rear wheel came loose a little and was slowly losing air. I found the problem when I bumped the stem with my hand while washing the wheel and heard a hiss of air. Apparently, I did not get the seal compressed quite enough. I try not to overtighten such fasteners as that often causes more harm than good, but I think I was a little light on this valve the first time around.

These are small which makes it easier to add air and the price is reasonable. And who doesn’t like a vendor named Kurvey Girl? :grin:
 
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