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Is there a list of tools I need and some valve adjusment for dummies instructions listed somewhere. Any tips and suggestions for a successful adjustment would be helpful. I have a 2009 R1200RT

Thanks

Tom
 

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Plasterman said:
Is there a list of tools I need and some valve adjusment for dummies instructions listed somewhere. Any tips and suggestions for a successful adjustment would be helpful. I have a 2009 R1200RT

Thanks

Tom
I bought the Jim Baden DVDs. Gave me all the info i needed for my 2004 R1150RT. Piece of cake, now. As is the throttle body sync.
 

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Aside from normal workbench stuff, Torx drivers (the 2010 and up need a T45 for the valve cover bolts) and feeler gauges. I'm not sure how the valves are adjusted, but would guess Torx, and maybe Hex drivers and the aforementioned normal workbench stuff should do it.
 

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Plasterman said:
Is there a list of tools I need and some valve adjusment for dummies instructions listed somewhere. Any tips and suggestions for a successful adjustment would be helpful. I have a 2009 R1200RT

Thanks

Tom
I have a set of the RT feeler gauges for your bike. You can have them if you want.
Let me know.
 

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GRB60 said:
Aside from normal workbench stuff, Torx drivers (the 2010 and up need a T45 for the valve cover bolts) and feeler gauges. I'm not sure how the valves are adjusted, but would guess Torx, and maybe Hex drivers and the aforementioned normal workbench stuff should do it.
Tom - the valve stems are a small hex wrench (somehow 3 mm sticks in my mind, but don't quote me - any decent assortment should have one) and the jam nuts are 10 mm hex. Feeler gauges are 0.15 mm (intake) and 0.30 mm (exhaust). And there is a Torx fitting for the cylinder cover bolts, T45 sounds about right, again a good assortment should have it (if you're doing valves you'll want Torx for other fittings, in particular T25 and T30 to remove the plastic). You'll also want a 16mm deep socket or plug wrench to remove the plug.

And - consider investing in a torque wrench. It doesn't take much to overtighten things. I have a 1/4" for the smaller/low torque (<~10 Nm) and 3/8" for the larger/moderate torque (>~10 Nm).

Aside from that, a decent selection of tools that most shade tree mechanics have will be fine.

Jim Von Baden has a pictorial on how to adjust the valves. Some of us also use plastic straw, chopstick or similar down the plug hole to confirm Top Dead Center.

JayJay
 

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JayJay said:
And - consider investing in a torque wrench. It doesn't take much to overtighten things. I have a 1/4" for the smaller/low torque (<~10 Nm) and 3/8" for the larger/moderate torque (>~10 Nm).

JayJay
JayJay - what brand torque wrench do you use? I am shopping for a pair of reliable ones.
 

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Torque wrenches... Craftsman: good but spendy

Harbor Freight: Low cost but accurate (?)

I have both and find that they are both reading the same- so maybe HF is OK. Your Call

To get the handiest tool in the box for a valve adjustment go to a 7/11 and get the really big /long straw. Use it to push into the spark plug hole to feel when you get to top dead center.

To do it right you need two feeler gauges... of each size.
Since there are two intake and two exhaust valves... you will get the best results if you have gauges for both at the same time.
 

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05Train said:
http://www.protorquetools.com/cat-35-1-109/cdi_dual_scale_micro_adjustable_torque_wrenches.htm

Those are the folks that make Snap-On's wrenches. They're awesome, and at the sale prices, they're a steal.
Thanks, I will give these some considerations. The prices are definitely a lot cheaper than Snap On prices!

Hopz - thanks for your comment also. I am going down to HF later to look at the MC Lift that they have. Got a coupon for $299, which is great price. I am going to pick up a pair of torque wrench there as well (partly based on your comment). I have a coupon for their 3/8" drive at less than $10, and the price for the 1/4" drive one is just a few dollars more. I do want to have a good one on-hand for more critical works, and so I might get a 3/8" drive one from the source that 05Train had provided as well.
 

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Protorque is the way to go. Great wrenches fair price. A lifetime tool.
 

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Get both sizes. The 1/4 for the spark plugs etc, and the big one for the Rear wheel and such.

No matter which brand you get, read and follow the instructions.

If you go for the HF one, practice on something else- not your bike- maybe your lawn mower... get used to the very subtle "click" of the proper torque. It is less of an audible and more of a touch thing... practice and then have no fear.

I have a big ole torsion-bar Craftsman which I know to be accurate. The H-F and the Sears Torsion bar are right on.

YMMV....
 

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PadG said:
JayJay - what brand torque wrench do you use? I am shopping for a pair of reliable ones.
Pad - sorry I didn't get back to you, had to do my Day Job today.

I think I ordered mine from McMaster-Carr, which is where I go for a lot of stuff. But if I had it to do over again I'd probably go ProTorque like Beech and Train. I'm assuming that your comment about a coupon from Harbor Freight for a $10 wrench is a typo, I'm afraid I'd be really skeptical about the ability of a $10 torque wrench to maintain any semblance of calibration over time.

I have a Craftsman 1/2" drive torque wrench that must be 30 years old that I used to rebuild old cast iron American V-8's back in the day.. Way overkill for anything aluminum now, 1/4" and 3/8" should do you fine.

BTW, for anything that uses multiple fasterners, it's a good idea to sneak up on the final value. Say the five bolts that hold the rear wheel. Run them all in finger tight, then go around again with finger tight while simultaneously wiggling the wheel to be sure things are seated. Then do a round with the torque wrench set at maybe 50% of the final value, then go to full value with another round. And after you've gone that round, go round once again to confirm that nothing has shifted. I do the same thing with the four bolts that hold the cylinder cover to be sure I get even pressure on the gasket, I've never had a leak.

JayJay
 

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hopz said:
Get both sizes. The 1/4 for the spark plugs etc, and the big one for the Rear wheel and such.

No matter which brand you get, read and follow the instructions.

If you go for the HF one, practice on something else- not your bike- maybe your lawn mower... get used to the very subtle "click" of the proper torque. It is less of an audible and more of a touch thing... practice and then have no fear.

I have a big ole torsion-bar Craftsman which I know to be accurate. The H-F and the Sears Torsion bar are right on.

YMMV....
Thanks hopz. I have used torque wrench quite often in the past, but usually in my engineering labs. Never bought one for home before, since back then, when I need a torque wrench at home, I simply bring the one from work home for the weekend! I hadn't paid any attentions to what brands they were, because my lab manager take care of buying them, and keeping inventory. Now that I am retired..........I need to have the tools at home!!


I did go to HF earlier this afternoon, and picked up the 3/8" drive one. With the coupon from Motorcycle magazine, that cost me all of $9.99 plus tax. On top of that I had a coupon to pick up a $9 multimeter for free. Not too bad. They didn't have the 1/4" drive torque wrench in stock, so I will check again when I go back to get the cycle lift. As I said in my previous message, I will also get a 3/8" torque wrench from CDI for more precision works, and use the HF ones for rough and not so precise works.
 

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JayJay said:
Pad - sorry I didn't get back to you, had to do my Day Job today.

I think I ordered mine from McMaster-Carr, which is where I go for a lot of stuff. But if I had it to do over again I'd probably go ProTorque like Beech and Train. I'm assuming that your comment about a coupon from Harbor Freight for a $10 wrench is a typo, I'm afraid I'd be really skeptical about the ability of a $10 torque wrench to maintain any semblance of calibration over time.

I have a Craftsman 1/2" drive torque wrench that must be 30 years old that I used to rebuild old cast iron American V-8's back in the day.. Way overkill for anything aluminum now, 1/4" and 3/8" should do you fine.

BTW, for anything that uses multiple fasterners, it's a good idea to sneak up on the final value. Say the five bolts that hold the rear wheel. Run them all in finger tight, then go around again with finger tight while simultaneously wiggling the wheel to be sure things are seated. Then do a round with the torque wrench set at maybe 50% of the final value, then go to full value with another round. And after you've gone that round, go round once again to confirm that nothing has shifted. I do the same thing with the four bolts that hold the cylinder cover to be sure I get even pressure on the gasket, I've never had a leak.

JayJay
Thanks JayJay. I use McMasters a lot also. I just don't know enough about their tools though.

No, the $9.99 coupon was not a typo. I picked one up just a few hours ago. If you get Motorcycle magazine, you will find that HF have some extraordinary coupons in there. The $9.99 torque wrench was normally listed at $39.95, or something like that. The motorcycle lift that I will be picking up in the near future is $299 with the coupon. It is on sale right now at HF for $499, and the "normal" list price is $599. Not too shabby, huh!
 

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GRB60 said:
Aside from normal workbench stuff, Torx drivers (the 2010 and up need a T45 for the valve cover bolts) and feeler gauges. I'm not sure how the valves are adjusted, but would guess Torx, and maybe Hex drivers and the aforementioned normal workbench stuff should do it.
Spark Plug Solution Hope this works.. for the spark plugs, a universal spark plug wrench from Lowes.. 5/8 on one end and I think 3/4 on the other.. problem was it was too short, the entire shaft was in the head even with the cover off. Solution? The front axle adaptor was a perfect fit and a 3 inch extension.. I had all the other tools already so total cost was $4.30.
 

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Still have the alternator belt and brake fluid to do but so far less than $100 into the 24k services..
 

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I guess I'm the luddite here because I don't get out torque wrenches just to do a valve adjustment. Nothing all that critical- just don't leave the adjuster nut loose enough to vibrate off and end up in the sump (won't get into anything - pickup has a screen- but you'll have wait for an oil change to get it back)

I prefer go / no-go feeler gauges for setting valves- for me its the easiest way to unsure .001" accuracy and I prefer it to relying on the feel method for single thickness gauges.
 
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