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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not near my 2005 model, at this time.. but on the last 2 recent rides the right grip heat doesn't work. I think there may be only one fuse for the handgrip heat...

anyone have any suggestions about where to look for the problem?
 

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cfell said:
. I think there may be only one fuse for the handgrip heat...

anyone have any suggestions about where to look for the problem?
Channing, when I bought my bike both were out and every time I put a fuse in, it blew (one fuse).
The cure was that LS replaced both grips for me under warranty.
 

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Deacon,

I looked throught the repair manual and it only shows one fuse (#6) for both grips. There are separate connectors for the different grips. Looks like you'll need to let LS take a look at it.
 

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My left grip went out and I had the dealer look at it when I had my throttle cables replaced. He told me the pins in the connector for the grip sometimes loosen up and it was repairable. He indicated the plug is under the audio control area. I don't know this to be true, just what I'm told!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, guys.. no blown fuse that I can tell. Looks like only ONE fuse for the heated grips. So, I'm gonna think about this overnite.. and will probably pull the tupperware off tamale for a look-see... make sure all is "tighty-righty"...
 

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Troubleshooting advice

Deacon,
First off, pardon me if you're an electrical expert. It didn't sound like it, so assume not.

I'm not near my LT shop manuals, so I'm basing this on electrical troubleshooting experience.

I haven't taken my grip off yet, but I'd bet it's easier to get at the connection where the wire attaches to the heating element at the grip. Also, the throttle action probably puts stress on the wire that attaches to the heating element. I wouldn't be surprised if the strain relief failed, resulting in a crimp, soldier or screw connection failure, whichever the case may be.

If you find the grip side connection is solid and you don't detect a problem by visual inspection, check the other end. If that connection is solid, get out the continuity tester (preferably a muliti-meter, which may be needed if the fault is not easily found). If there's no continuity from one end of the wire to the other, you'll be replacing the wire or doing a bypass around the broken/frayed wire (assuming you can locate and reach that failure). The decision to replace or bypass is a matter of time, materials, and whether you can find the point failure.

If you get continuity from one end to the other,
* the heating element in the grip may have failed

* the wire insulation may have worn thin and be leaking current to ground. The paint could provide enough resistance to limit current or an insulation failure could be in the early stages (again limiting current to ground). A leak can be diagnosed by measuring the resistance from the wire to the motorcycle ground. If you take this measurement, disconnect battery ground cable. With the ohm meter on the highest setting, megaohm scale, you should measure open.

A few other possibilities may come to mind later. If you want advice from me after checking the connections at both ends, verifying continuity, and checking for a current leak, PM me to get my attention (I might not remember to check this thread again). I have a few electrical troubleshooting tricks up my sleeve, but this is getting too winded to say more without further info.
 

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Another thought

cfell said:
Thanks JG.. I'll do those steps. I'm not an "expert" or novice.. so I know enough to know I don't enough you know? ;}
You're welcome. It's good you're not a novice.

If you set your multi-meter to d.c. volts, expose the grip wiring and heating element, turn on the heated grip switch, you can measure to determine whether voltage is getting to the heating element. I probably should have recommended this as the first step (but I didn't know whether you were a novice, who should not measure currents and perhaps voltages without some assistance the first time).

If you see two wires and it's not clear which is the positive (input to the heating element), measure both (from the respective connections to ground). One should read 0 - 0.5 volts (the neutral/common), the other should read 12-14 volts. Be careful not to short the connector to ground with the probe (it's a common error made by Freshmen EE students). It's only a fuse if everything works as advertised, but we're not testing the fault system.

Good luck. Let us know how it goes.
 
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