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2019 R1250RT
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Well, CANBUS does nothing other than monitor voltage to designated circuits. With some level of voltage drop, it figures that you've got a light out, hence the warning.

That should be a "pass/fail" test beginning when the lights activate. If you're getting that warning after riding with high beams a while (with no CANBUS bulb alert), my guess is that the LED's are involved with some sort of voltage fluctuation. A couple of possible reasons (among others): a) The quality of the installed LED's is inadequate, b) the LED's are actually close to failing, c) undissipated heat build up is causing either LED failure or degraded performance.** It IS both science and art. The CANBUS bulb error definitely tells you that something's up with your circuit and/or bulb, and the "art" is BMW engineering, as in, trying to figure out how they engineered the CANBUS controller module to operate when detecting defective bulbs. (Figuring out BMW engineering, is definitely an art! 馃ぃ)

This fine fellow nails the details better than I can.

** I intend to take some measures to guarantee airflow around the LED heatsink and fan, maybe cut the dust covers, not sure, when I install mine next week, to mitigate potential heat related problems.
I wouldn't recommend cutting the covers. You'd be susceptible to moisture buildup inside the headlight.
 

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I wouldn't recommend cutting the covers. You'd be susceptible to moisture buildup inside the headlight.
Yep, that concerns me, living up here in the NW. That's sort of another point. I suspect that some folks having early LED failures are perhaps living in warmer climates. Riding in 100F+ weather might fry an LED without adequate ventilation faster than someone riding in 50F or 65F. Danged if you do, or danged if ya don't.

The bulbs are supposed to be here in a day or so. When I tear this puppy down, I'll see exactly what I'm dealing with, and see what ways there might be to increase ventilation without increasing moisture risk. I may be overthinking it all. Other riders have cut their covers for venting and experienced no (reported) moisture problems, and some say that the headlight assem. We'll see how this works out.
 

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@Audi403 When you get a chance to ride with your high beams on for an extended period of time keep an eye on your dash to see if you get a bulb out warning. Hopefully mine is just overly sensitive...
I'll let you know...
Yep, that concerns me, living up here in the NW. That's sort of another point. I suspect that some folks having early LED failures are perhaps living in warmer climates. Riding in 100F+ weather might fry an LED without adequate ventilation faster than someone riding in 50F or 65F. Danged if you do, or danged if ya don't.

The bulbs are supposed to be here in a day or so. When I tear this puppy down, I'll see exactly what I'm dealing with, and see what ways there might be to increase ventilation without increasing moisture risk. I may be overthinking it all. Other riders have cut their covers for venting and experienced no (reported) moisture problems, and some say that the headlight assem. We'll see how this works out.
I've had condensation inside poorly sealed lights before. Not on a motorcycle but I think the same concern is there. My Ducati has LED headlights and I haven't had any issues with it. Over 700km on the new Cyclops on the RT already, no lights or issues yet.
 

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'21 R1250RT
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I replaced headlight globes with LED ones on the '06 RT I owned. Used 3, two for low beam, one for high. All 3 were from Stedi (STEDI鈩 | LED Headlight Upgrade Conversion kits Australia.) and all three had the copper mesh stuffed in around the back of the reflectors and the cover screwed back on. I rode the bike up to about 40 C with zero issues for a couple of years. I think the quality of the LED and cooling is the critical part, mesh cooling not being a problem at all.
 

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@Audi403 When you get a chance to ride with your high beams on for an extended period of time keep an eye on your dash to see if you get a bulb out warning. Hopefully mine is just overly sensitive...
Hey @Black_Dog , I did 45 minutes tonight with the highbeams on, except to dim for traffic, no bulb out warnings yet. Loving the light output. The high beams are pretty intense, makes night time riding a lot more comfortable. Haven't got flashed by any other drivers either. Taking the time to lower the aim of the low beam to match the factory cutoff seemed to work great.
 

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Yep, that concerns me, living up here in the NW. That's sort of another point. I suspect that some folks having early LED failures are perhaps living in warmer climates. Riding in 100F+ weather might fry an LED without adequate ventilation faster than someone riding in 50F or 65F. Danged if you do, or danged if ya don't.
It is routinely over 100 degrees where I live, and I've had my cyclops kit installed for years/10s of thousands of miles without additional venting.

I am just one data point, but so far so good.
 

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2020 R1250RT Alpine White
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234 Posts
Have my Cyclops CIL-RT-15 LED headlight kit ready for installation next week but, since the only instructions in the box are tips for "R1200GS" I'm a bit confused.

There are two CANBUS resistor packs in the kit and was assuming (from the number) that one of these goes on each high-beam, but reading the thread makes me think one on a high-beam and one on the low-beam?

Anyone have something written from Cyclops or in the alternative, what's the best plan?

Thanks -
Larry
 

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Discussion Starter · #88 ·
They've obviously changed a few things since this was started, (but not their outdated paper instructions, which had me confused for quite a bit). I'd give them a call for current verbal instruction.
 

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2018 R1200RT
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Have my Cyclops CIL-RT-15 LED headlight kit ready for installation next week but, since the only instructions in the box are tips for "R1200GS" I'm a bit confused.

There are two CANBUS resistor packs in the kit and was assuming (from the number) that one of these goes on each high-beam, but reading the thread makes me think one on a high-beam and one on the low-beam?

Anyone have something written from Cyclops or in the alternative, what's the best plan?

Thanks -
Larry
Not sure if your question is in regards to the product (e.g. resistor packs), or to the entire project. Yes, product questions go back to Cyclops, they'll be very helpful. As to the project itself ....

I picked up some LED H1/H7 replacements off Amazon. The install was ~~~ difficult ~~~. I tried initially to install the new bulbs using BMW's approved method, but I didn't have the hands of the 5 year old who wrote those instructions. Instead, i have the big, adult sized hands. After a week of playing around with it, I finally decided to just get the job done, and pulled the headlight assembly out of the bike. If this looks scary, well, yeah, it is, but it's not that difficult to do.

Wheel Tire Automotive lighting Automotive tire Vehicle


... to get to this:

Grille Car Vehicle Automotive lighting Hood


... which flipped around, looks like this:

Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Automotive design Gas Motorcycle accessories


As I mentioned earlier, I started out in half measures, removing the left speaker cover and speaker, to see what was hiding underneath (pictured below, left high beam & H1 bulb through the access port). While I could SEE what needed to be done, I couldn't reach it. I was able to eventually remove both retaining clips on the H1 bulb, but could also see that I'd never be able to position the LED's bulb's bracket, without dropping it down into the light assembly (which would require tearing everything down anyhow). When I finally had the assembly out of the bike, I realized pretty quickly I could never have successfully installed these things without removing it, due to both the brackets and bulb size, and connecting up the wires (which required using provided jumper wires, because the bulb's pins were up against the edge of the plastic access port/hole, making it impossible to attach the BMW's light plug)..

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Automotive lighting Hood Rim


I have a full folder of directions, mine and BMW's (i.e. service manual), plus some pictures that I can share with you if you think you need it. I won't publish it here, since it includes copyrighted BMW documentation excerpts (in PDF form). Send me a private message with an email address, and I'll send you the files in a ZIP file. The biggest problems I had were in understanding how to remove a couple of BMW's plastic rivets (without breaking them). The one on the side fairings has a center section "pull out", which releases the rivet stays (i.e. plastic fingers), while the one on the nose fairings looks like a Phillips screw, which in fact, does screw outward to release the rivet stays behind the plastic. (BMW doesn't explain EVERYthing in their documentation at the "village idiot" level, i.e. my level.)

Probably more info than you were requesting, but then again, what do ya expect when the local village idiot responds to your post. 馃檮馃槒
 

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2020 R1250RT Alpine White
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Not sure if your question is in regards to the product (e.g. resistor packs), or to the entire project. Yes, product questions go back to Cyclops, they'll be very helpful. As to the project itself ....

I picked up some LED H1/H7 replacements off Amazon. The install was ~~~ difficult ~~~. I tried initially to install the new bulbs using BMW's approved method, but I didn't have the hands of the 5 year old who wrote those instructions. Instead, i have the big, adult sized hands. After a week of playing around with it, I finally decided to just get the job done, and pulled the headlight assembly out of the bike. If this looks scary, well, yeah, it is, but it's not that difficult to do.



... to get to this:



... which flipped around, looks like this:



As I mentioned earlier, I started out in half measures, removing the left speaker cover and speaker, to see what was hiding underneath (pictured below, left high beam & H1 bulb through the access port). While I could SEE what needed to be done, I couldn't reach it. I was able to eventually remove both retaining clips on the H1 bulb, but could also see that I'd never be able to position the LED's bulb's bracket, without dropping it down into the light assembly (which would require tearing everything down anyhow). When I finally had the assembly out of the bike, I realized pretty quickly I could never have successfully installed these things without removing it, due to both the brackets and bulb size, and connecting up the wires (which required using provided jumper wires, because the bulb's pins were up against the edge of the plastic access port/hole, making it impossible to attach the BMW's light plug)..



I have a full folder of directions, mine and BMW's (i.e. service manual), plus some pictures that I can share with you if you think you need it. I won't publish it here, since it includes copyrighted BMW documentation excerpts (in PDF form). Send me a private message with an email address, and I'll send you the files in a ZIP file. The biggest problems I had were in understanding how to remove a couple of BMW's plastic rivets (without breaking them). The one on the side fairings has a center section "pull out", which releases the rivet stays (i.e. plastic fingers), while the one on the nose fairings looks like a Phillips screw, which in fact, does screw outward to release the rivet stays behind the plastic. (BMW doesn't explain EVERYthing in their documentation at the "village idiot" level, i.e. my level.)

Probably more info than you were requesting, but then again, what do ya expect when the local village idiot responds to your post. 馃檮馃槒
Thanks Scott for the detailed post and pics - I had already decided to pull the entire assembly and have the REPROM, but appreciate your post.

I was hoping that someone who had also received a kit with two CANBUS resistors had gotten the instructions from Cyclops but it seems like I may be the first. I am extremely hearing impaired but will have my wife call and ask them for a readout. (I will also send an email to see if there actually are any instructions for the 2013-2020 RTs.)

Thanks again for your detailed response!

Ride safe -
Larry
 

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2020 R1250RT Alpine White
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Thanks Scott for the detailed post and pics - I had already decided to pull the entire assembly and have the REPROM, but appreciate your post.

I was hoping that someone who had also received a kit with two CANBUS resistors had gotten the instructions from Cyclops but it seems like I may be the first. I am extremely hearing impaired but will have my wife call and ask them for a readout. (I will also send an email to see if there actually are any instructions for the 2013-2020 RTs.)

Thanks again for your detailed response!

Ride safe -
Larry
What a great outfit to deal with, especially these days when so many business are operating with just a fraction of their normal staffing.

The wrong instruction sheet was an oversight and in response to my email I got the proper instructions and multiple follow-ups to make sure I had what I needed and offer of assistance should need arise.

In response to my question, where do the two CANBUS resistor packs go, one goes on the RIGHT-HAND (from the riders position) H1 high-beam and one on the H7 (center) low-beam. Although it's a bit of puzzle solving to get the items into the enclosure there is more than enough space in there for everything. (In my case although the H1 high beam units were easier to stuff with the headlight assembly inverted on the table, the H7 low-beam actually was easier (for me) if I set the assembly upright (and tilted due to it's geometry) and then gravity helps pull everything toward the bottom of the unit. Your mileage may vary! Haha)

Garage testing indicated, as expected, the beam pattern for the LEDs was higher than the OEM bulbs, so I lowered that and now will reassemble the tupperware et al. and take the bike for a ride in the pre-sunrise darkness to check out the light pattern for real.

Taking the headlight assembly off is definitely the way to play it in my opinion. It's a bit of a chore to get the bike undressed, but sure pays off when you need to fiddle with all that stuff going in the holes.

Ride safe,
Larry
 

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Discussion Starter · #94 ·
Hmmm. I was getting excited until this post given how hot Vegas is in the summer!
As the OP of this thread, the real question to ask (if you continued reading the entire thread) is how many failures have you read of the Cyclops LEDS on the entire site or other Wethead RT forums? I'm not going to say zero because I haven't checked, but not many, and nearly everybody has had at least one halogen H7 bulb failure or more. My first one went out within the first 7,000 miles from brand new and in the middle of a 15,000 mile trip around the country, and I've now had these Cyclops units for 3 years with zero issues. I ride my bike from Seattle to Palm Springs, CA and back where it stays for 5-6 months at or near triple digits - even Death Valley, the Mojave Desert, woah, even Los Vegas. I doubt ambient temperature is a problem at all, depending on how and where you ride. Certainly not when the bike is just sitting there and not being ridden, and when it is moving, there is extra air passing over the headlights and through the cowlings that help. Maybe if you're just cruising the strip mid-day that might cause an issue, but that's not the kind of riding I do and there are other more critical parts of the bike that are more stressed than LEDs and their associated chips in high temperatures. That's what those internal fans help do - disburse the potentially damaging heat to them to the rest of the headlight fixture.
 

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As the OP of this thread, the real question to ask (if you continued reading the entire thread) is how many failures have you read of the Cyclops LEDS on the entire site or other Wethead RT forums? I'm not going to say zero because I haven't checked, but not many, and nearly everybody has had at least one halogen H7 bulb failure or more. My first one went out within the first 7,000 miles from brand new and in the middle of a 15,000 mile trip around the country, and I've now had these Cyclops units for 3 years with zero issues. I ride my bike from Seattle to Palm Springs, CA and back where it stays for 5-6 months at or near triple digits - even Death Valley, the Mojave Desert, woah, even Los Vegas. I doubt ambient temperature is a problem at all, depending on how and where you ride. Certainly not when the bike is just sitting there and not being ridden, and when it is moving, there is extra air passing over the headlights and through the cowlings that help. Maybe if you're just cruising the strip mid-day that might cause an issue, but that's not the kind of riding I do and there are other more critical parts of the bike that are more stressed than LEDs and their associated chips in high temperatures. That's what those internal fans help do - disburse the potentially damaging heat to them to the rest of the headlight fixture.
One thing to think about is, what is the average operating temperature for a halogen light bulb? Now, what's the average temperature for an LED lightbulb? The LED's that I purchased are tested to 300F (and of course, they have both the heat sink and the fan). I'm sure that there are low quality LED's out there which will fail under lower heat conditions. (And, actually, I'd be more concerned about the impact of motorcycle vibration over heat.) However, after reading quite about (and worrying to much over) LED headlights, I'm confident that what I'm running is no more at risk than the OEM Halogens, which unfortunately, fail on a fairly routine basis. (I'd also be comfortable with Cyclops without the fan, if they were more reasonably priced.)

I also worried about trying to modify the back covers of my Wethead, to allow adequate ventilation. Again, think about it. If BMW did not do this for their halogens, what makes anyone think that we'd need to do it for LEDs? So, I skipped that, and wrapped them back up, OEM style after the LED installation.

Some folks confuse LED's with HID's, which put out more heat and require separate ballast and an ignitor to function, outside of the lamp enclosure. LED's also have an average lifespan 3x longer than HID's (and we won't even bother with the halogen comparison on lifespan).

Cyclops have a good reputation. ADVmonster's were popular some years back, but that business has become totally unreliable (indeed, they may be out of business by now). The LED's I bought have at least a decent Amazon (re: online) reputation (which has variable reliability, since may Chinese firms or American-front Chinese firms "buy" their reviews by offering initial purchasers the equivalent of their money back, for a positive review).

The biggest hassle in any case, is installation. If I tour, I'll have the set of OEM halogens in my repair kit (along with all the tools necessary to pull the headlight assembly if need be to install them), for backup.

Beyond that, we all worry too much. "We takes our chances" and adjust with the results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #97 ·
Beyond that, we all worry too much. "We takes our chances" and adjust with the results.
You meant "some of us", but not me. Scott, you need to get back to actually doing more on your farkle list (and probably riding) instead of thinking out loud in streams of semi-consciousness about all your choices my friend.

I have a decent tool kit I carry to do a number of repairs, but I will never be disassembling the front end of the RT on the road just to replace a low ("dipped") headlight ever again. Others may not know this, but the right side high beam automatically comes on instead so just carry on and do all that at home. I do still have a halogen H7 under the pillion seat, so worse comes to worst I could always unclip the LED's screw on retainer already under the clips and put it back in, or, have Cyclops mail me a new LED to a location a couple of days out if on another long trip and just plug that back in there.
 

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Hi Mike,

I tried the FM radio with the Cyclops LED headlights and with their supplied noise suppressor on the antenna cable.
On a positive note, I did not hear what I would call "static", simply the on again off again signal strength while riding. With the motor off but lights on (Hi and Low) I didn't hear static as well.

The other thing I didn't mention was I replaced the whip antenna with a Stubby, so reception for me is bad to begin with. At times putting FM in scan mode, it just loops forever or finds a station I can't stand.
I installed Cyclops on my new to me 2016 RT on 2021. The FM noise was terrible! I called Cyclops, and the sold me the new FM suppressor ($10+?). After that, I heard no noise on FM, which I listen to often when in or close to town. I later also installed stubby antenna from AutoZone ($19) and Motocelllo (Bluetooth bypass). No FM noise.
 

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2018 R1200RT
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I installed Cyclops on my new to me 2016 RT on 2021. The FM noise was terrible! I called Cyclops, and the sold me the new FM suppressor ($10+?). After that, I heard no noise on FM, which I listen to often when in or close to town. I later also installed stubby antenna from AutoZone ($19) and Motocelllo (Bluetooth bypass). No FM noise.
Hi, I looked at Autozone online; can you tell me which one you installed? Thanks
 

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Thank you Rainman for all your posts on installing Cyclops LED headlight bulbs.

After dropping not one, but two, bulb bases down in to the headlight housing I'll soon be removing the headlight housing to retrieve the bases and install a complete set of led bulbs.

The disassembly drawings give me courage to attempt the job.
 
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