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Discussion Starter #1
I bought new ME 888 tires for my LT and when trying to remove the front wheel I stripped out one of the pinch bolts. I want to replace both of these. Where do I find quality replacement bolts?

alex
 

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I bought new ME 888 tires for my LT and when trying to remove the front wheel I stripped out one of the pinch bolts. I want to replace both of these. Where do I find quality replacement bolts?

alex
Either order them from a dealer or you might try an local ACE hardware. They have a good assortment of stainless hex cap bolts. I have not had much luck at my local HD and Lowes for such things.

Dealer part and price from MAX BMW. Fiche has the same bolt for all years.

31 42 2 312 035 FILLISTER-HEAD SCREW - M8X40-8.8-SW 0.04 2 $7.20
 

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There's nothing particularly special about them, you could just take them along to any place that sells fasteners and they should be able to sell you a couple.
 

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I bought new ME 888 tires for my LT and when trying to remove the front wheel I stripped out one of the pinch bolts. I want to replace both of these. Where do I find quality replacement bolts?

alex


For critical fasteners like this, I stick with OEM. That ensures correct grade, compatible plating and appropriate shoulders and unthreaded length.
 

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Enjoy The Ride
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After you break the pinch bolt loose you should only turn it another 1/4 to 1/2 turn at the most. Hopefully the threads are still ok in the fork.
 

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M8x40 allen cap screw is a common screw. When you purchase a metric cap screw it will be 8.8 grade right off the top. ACE generally has a good metric choice. I have a box but mailing would cost more that buying from a dealer. Should only be a buck fifty locally. Being a hex socket, years of tire changing and corrosion, I suggest folks with 15 year old bikes change out some of the frequently messed with fasteners. And make sure their allen wrenches are true with a sharp edged hex. No off angle work or not inserted to the bottom.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone. I realized yesterday that there is a Fastenal store in Morristown. They have the screws in stock. I purchased them this morning. I believe they will work just fine.

Just a note about how I removed the stripped screw. After looking online yesterday I found a video where a young man had a stripped screw for the front caliper on a Japanese sport bike. What he did was drill the socket screw out with a bit slightly smaller than a star socket. Then he hammered the star socket into the screw. The star pattern cut new grooves in the stripped screw. Then it was very easy to remove the screw.

Mine was a little tougher than the video; but, with perseverance and a larger star socket I was finally able to get the socket to engage with the screw. Carefully I applied torque with a breaker bar and removed the stripped screw. The reason I had to make the extra effort is that I had previously tried to use a cold chisel to turn the stripped screw. That tore up the side of the screw and made it difficult to get any bite from the star socket. The cold chisel had worked before in another situation.

IMHO the star socket approach is much easier and more reliable than using an easy-out extractor. Sometimes those things break off leave you with an extremely hard piece of steel stuck in the stripped fastener.

Alex
 

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Alex, to keep confusion to a minimum, which I got sucked into last night, "star socket" is not the correct term. Torx is what you are referring to. And the size this bolt uses is T45. A T40 fits but will strip the interior of the fastener out.
 
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Alex, to keep confusion to a minimum, which I got sucked into last night, "star socket" is not the correct term. Torx is what you are referring to. And the size this bolt uses is T45. A T40 fits but will strip the interior of the fastener out.
Yes about the "star" being Torx, but the LT pinch bolts are M 6 Allen head not Torx.
 

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Thanks for that, I thought the bike used hex also but was confused by the conversation. That is why I went through all the bs about getting new bolts once and a while. Hex sockets wear out (faster than Torx).
 

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Thanks for that, I thought the bike used hex also but was confused by the conversation. That is why I went through all the bs about getting new bolts once and a while. Hex sockets wear out (faster than Torx).
I've never seen a hex head wear out. I have seen many ruined, most frequently by use of cheap wrenches that often are undersized (any manufacturing engineer can explain why) and less frequently by being overtorqued. Another common cause is not cleaning the head well which prevents the wrench engaging to full depth. This is where Torx is worse than hex. Torx heads hold dirt better and are harder to clean thoroughly.

And bolt head with any dirt on it should be picked clean and, if possible, hit with a spritz of brake cleaner.
 
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As little of torque the pinch bolts take it's hard for me to see how you could mess up the head of the bolt.
 

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Ruined=Worn out. If I tell a tire customer in my shop he has Fxxked up his fastener with poor technique, he will never come back. It is not my objective to mess with people but to keep bikes rolling.
 

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As little of torque the pinch bolts take it's hard for me to see how you could mess up the head of the bolt.
I have seen a few ways such bolt heads get buggered:

1. Torx drive in hex head or vice versa.
2. Bolt head 2/3 full of mud such that wrench engages only 1/3 normal depth.
3. Use of cheap Chinese tools that are often significantly undersized. This is to ensure that with high sigma manufacturing statistics no wrench that is too large will get through. When variance is high, the mean has to be much farther from the specification limit.
4. Ratchet set to tighten and user turns bolt the wrong way before realizing it (generally very inexperienced mechanics).
 

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Ruined=Worn out. If I tell a tire customer in my shop he has Fxxked up his fastener with poor technique, he will never come back. It is not my objective to mess with people but to keep bikes rolling.
Ok, different philosophies. I prefer to be accurate and educate customers. This can be done tactfully with most people.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for the reminder that it is a Torx and not a Star socket. I used Star because that was what was in the video. I am certainly used to the BMW Torx screws all over my motorcycle.

Sometimes if you are not careful or if the light is not that good you may use a hex socket instead of a Torx or vice versa. It is easy to do. When you make this mistake you will ruin the Torx head screw. The other way screws get damaged is if you do not insert the tool exactly perpendicular to the axis of the screw. Some screws like a pinch bolt are already at an angle and not parallel to the ground. So you may insert the tool and turn and now the edges of the screw are damaged.

So I am replacing the Torx screws in various places on my bike. As far as the pinch bolts I am using a M8-1.25 X 40 Socket Head Cap Screw that I purchased from Fastenal.

I also replaced the oil filter cover screws with socket head cap screws.

Alex
 
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