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Discussion Starter #1
Well, I gotts a drip from the Hall Effect cover, so I need to replace the timing cover sealing ring. Got it on right the first go round, but not the second, and it is pretty mangled.

I'm not finding too much info on how this is done.

For starters, I can't figure out how to get the oil pressure wire to go through that small hole in the water pump, and wonder how I'm going to get it back in. The water temp wire came out easily.

I've been looking for a picture of the special tools with no luck:"Press the sealing ring in from the inside using pressing-in tool, BMW No. 11 1 610, and handle, BMW No. 00 5 500.

Will I be able to install the seal with the cover still attached to the engine by the oil pressure wire?

I've found a pulley that is about the same diameter as the seal and wondered if I could use a C clamp to press the seal in place?
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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You could remove the rotor flange of the crank to make it easier to pull and insert the seal. Then slid it in dry and re torque it. The risk is that the gear may move as that part has the pin that locks it all to the crank. But you should be able to re align it. I had no trouble getting the oil wire out, slide the cover back and it may fit then.

When I had my cover off for the re-ring I bought a new front rotor flange as the seal had worn a grove in it. Before I re-installed the cover I use the old rotor flange to "form" the lip of the seal inward before I placed the cover back on. Looks like that is what you do with the BMW tool as you slide it on to the driving mandrill.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks John, as always.

I will be able to remove the flange without locking the motor from the back as in the manual?

"I had no trouble getting the oil wire out" ????
I have not yet attempted to remove the seal...

I'm have a bit of trouble following, are you suggesting to:
remove the flange
slide the seal on the flange
reinstall the flange
and then simply install the timing cover and the seal will be installed in the timing cover?

I went back and look at your ring thread but didn't see any pictures.
 

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2005 K1200LT
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I guess I did a lousy job explaining. Put the bike in gear to hold the crank or remove the crankcase cover to hold the crank. With the flange off the bike the seal can be removed much easier and safer. Then install the seal any way you can flush since there will be nothing contacting the inner part of the seal, then push the flange in dry and tighten it down.

With the crankcase cover off you will also have access to the crankshaft cam chain drive gear to help align the flange pin into the gear.
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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Here are some pics that might help. First one shows how hard it would be to pull the old seal out with out marking up the flange. If you removed the flange there would be more access to pull the old and install the new. The once it is flush with the cover you can just insert the flange (dry) and torque it down.

The next two shots show what you can access with the crankcase cover off and the final product. Also shows where on the flange the lip wear area is.

The steps in the manual assume the cover is off the bike and the seal needs to be "formed" since you will slide the seal onto the flange. My way has the flange out of the way when you press in the seal using any smooth flat surface larger in diameter than the seal so it will be flush. Then you will slide the flange into the seal forming it as you go since the lip points to the engine.
 

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For the record, I also did this seal when I did the timing chain guides but I had the cover off when I installed the seal. There is no lip in the seal hole to stop the seal from being installed too far. Notice in John's picture that the front of the seal is flush with the small surface flat areas under the cover. I removed the rotor flange and used it to initially form the seal, then installed the cover which is where you are. Then I installed the flange from the outside and tightened it while in gear.
 

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I just noticed that you must have used something the was just a hair bigger in diameter than the seal as there is no clearance for a larger diameter driver.
 

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I just noticed that you must have used something the was just a hair bigger in diameter than the seal as there is no clearance for a larger diameter driver.
Hi guys, last summer, I replaced my timing chain liners, when I had my valves adjusted. Everything was fine until I replaced the famous crankshaft seal, resulting in a small dripping through the cover all summer long. 😟 I REALLY tried to find the BMW Drift tool, but It's like hunting a rabbit in the desert! This being said, I wanna know if you need to release pressure on the timing chain to unscrew the flange?

Thanks for your advice! :)


Daniel
 

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I think I would, but just like you do when you remove the cams. The gear is on a spigot at the end of the crankshaft and it keyed by a pin in the back side of the flange. It would be less likely to come off the crank if there was no tension on it. With the flange out the seal can be pulled and the replacement installed flush with a suitable driver. Then you will install the flange DRY into the seal, just make sure the pin holds the gear.
 

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I think I would, but just like you do when you remove the cams. The gear is on a spigot at the end of the crankshaft and it keyed by a pin in the back side of the flange. It would be less likely to come off the crank if there was no tension on it. With the flange out the seal can be pulled and the replacement installed flush with a suitable driver. Then you will install the flange DRY into the seal, just make sure the pin holds the gear.
Thanks for the fast answer!
So, I'll open the valves cover, 'lock' the timing chain on both sprokets with tie raps (just in case!) 🙂, then, release pressure on timing chain and here I'll go! 🏍
 

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Locking the chain to the cam sprockets can't hurt, in fact it is good protection should the gear on the crank slip.
 

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Locking the chain to the cam sprockets can't hurt, in fact it is good protection should the gear on the crank slip.
I agree with you! 😃 That's kind of safety tricks I learned watching Kirk Johnson's videos. With time, I learned to be patient. It costs less!!! 😁
Again, thank's for your advices.
 

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When you insert the 1/8 inch bit to hold the tensioner, grab it with a pair of pliers and rotate it CW and then CCW. If you have properly trapped the tensioner it will rotate in one direction much easier than in the other.
 

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Thank's for the trick Jzeiler. And one of the most important is 'To mark the position of the magnetic gate in relation to the engine block'. I'm gonna cross my fingers an jump in it next saturday. In the meanwhile, I'll do the oil and coolant flush and finis the Tupperware party. 🥳 It's a chance that there are communities like yours to help us going further. (y)
 

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Here's an update of my job: I finally choosed to remove the timing chain cover to have a better access to the flange. Just before removing the flange, I began to unscrew it and I positioned it a way to see the slot in the crankshaft (where the flange pin goes) with cover reinstalled. More job to do as I had to remove both radiators and purge the engine oil but easyer way to remove the flange and the seal. Then, I reinstalled the timing chain cover with the new seal on it and reinstalled the flange. When I took off side Tupperware panel, I noticed a leak coming from the right fork and did it in the same time. It took me a lot of time but, 2 days later using my LT, still no leak! I was uncomfortable whit the idea to unscrew the flange and the risk to loose the timing. As always, the secret is to gather the more information you need, digest it, have faith in yourself (loaded with your usefull advices😀) and, most important, take your time. The faster you try to go, the more mistakes you risk to make. Again, thank's guys!👍👍👍
 

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Just FYI, I went through the same issues trying to install a new seal. My son, a BMW master mechanic, came to visit and brought a new seal and the special BMW tool. With the timing chain cover installed on the bike, I pulled the old seal out with the drill-a-hole-insert-a-screw method. We oiled the new seal and, using the tool, had it in in about 30 seconds. No leaks so far at 15,000 miles.

GB
 
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