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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone know if there is such a thing as a locking nut to lock the rear wheel on the K1200LT? Have a friend who had someone try to steal or sabotage his K1200LT rear wheel overnight at a hotel a couple of weeks ago. They left the bike visually untouched, but it looks like they loosened the bolts enough for them to last 30 miles.... he's lucky he didn't crash as a result.

I sure will be visually checking this every time I'm parked overnight somewhere, but interested if there's a locking nut that requires a key of some kind like you can get for car wheels. Couldn't see anything on Google.
 

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You might be able to find some kind of bolt to use as a lug bolt, that takes a special tool to remove.

But having your rear wheel come loose is not unheard of. A friend of mine had his rear wheel come off this R1150 RT this last spring. He put it on the ground pretty hard. He got scuffed up, but didn't brake anything. His bike on the other hand ,didn't do as well . I am not sure what he did wrong putting the wheel on , but it came back to bit him.

You need to have the rear wheel torqued up properly & that it is dry. If there is some lubricant like anti-seise on the lug bolt, It can come loose.
 

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Never use any type of lubricant on a lug bolt or lug nut. It can cause the symptoms you described. Opinions vary but I use medium grade thread locker on the bolts. That way I don't need to worry about them coming loose or being seized up when it's time to take them off. By the way, putting them on too loose can make them come loose down the road and putting them on too tight can cause the bolts to shear, causing instant failure. Personally I doubt that someone took the time to sabotage the bike. They were likely just left loose when the wheel was installed. With all that said, I am not aware of any locking wheel bolts for the LT.
 

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I take one additional step when re-installing a rear wheel. After torquing the lugs to spec (sorry I'd have to look in the book), I take a test ride and return and check the torque again. Often I have found a need for a tweek.
 

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Boatzo said:
I take one additional step when re-installing a rear wheel. After torquing the lugs to spec (sorry I'd have to look in the book), I take a test ride and return and check the torque again. Often I have found a need for a tweek.
x2..........another thing I've learned to do is to ride another 100 mi. then check them again.....You really don't want to get to annal about it and over torque or anything, but if you go back and check them a time or two; you should be pretty much good to go..........$00.02
:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
deanwoolsey said:
Personally I doubt that someone took the time to sabotage the bike.
Sadly there was evidence that someone tried to get in there - this guy is fastidious about his bike, and someone scratched up the rear mudguard screws - looked like they tried to take it off with a phillips head instead of a torx. We suspect it was an attempt to take the wheel that didn't get completed.

I will take the advice though - torque, ride then torque again.....

Thanks for the replies - much appreciated!
 

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Boatzo said:
I take one additional step when re-installing a rear wheel. After torquing the lugs to spec (sorry I'd have to look in the book), I take a test ride and return and check the torque again. Often I have found a need for a tweek.
If you do this then be sure to loosen each bolt and then re torque it to the correct specs. Applying the, BMW specified, correct torque to a bolt that is static (non moving) will over torque that bolt...not a good thing. The bolt needs to be rotating and stretching (before it comes to a stop) to achieve the correct torque reading. Hope this helps.
 

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Id be more inclined to think that the thief was going to bolt it on a BMW. I dont think a thief would be that energetic, to actually have to remount the tire.
 

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The wheel bolts on the LT look a lot like the wheel bolts for Porsche and VWs I've worked on in the past.
If you know the size and pitch, you can likely find some lock bolts at a wheel shop or import parts store.
The trick is finding a replacement wheel bolt that has chamfer angle at the shoulder identical to the original bolts (yes, I know they are separate bolt and conical washer, but auto lug bolts are usually one piece).
The chamfer angle has to match or else the bolts may come loose or the stress concentration clamping force of the bolt is concentrated and can result in failure of the wheel.
 
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