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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been noticing some dust on my rear wheel when I get in from a ride, so I check it and the wheel is hot to the touch, much hotter than the front. The brakes aren't dragging and there's no abnormal wear on the pads. This has been going on for some time. I just finished a much needed brake flush, hopeing that could be the problem. No such luck. I,m sure I,m not riding the brakes and I've put the bike on the center stand as soon as I get home and with the engine running, no brake drag. Is this normal? Any ideas?
 

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Running down the highway with me and my pillion aboard at 80 mph when it is 90 degrees on
asphalt road my rear tire temperture can run anywhere from 160 to 170 F and when pulling my
Unigo trailer they it gets up to 180 fegrees F running Bridgestone bias ply tires I use a
Smarttire TPM that gives temp and pressure both. The sensor is mounted via a strap on the
wheel rim thus it is quite possible that with the addition of the horsepower going thru the gear
drive that the wheel really gets up there in temperature.

The front tire usually get no hotter that 140 F.

I called a Bridgestone Tire Engineer on this and he had no problem witht the tire getting up to
180 degrees F. I get a little nervous and usually drop down from 80 mph and the tire pressure
and temperature both drop slightly. As a point of reference I fill the rear tire to 48 PSI when cold
and when the pressure gets up the pressure rises to about 56 to 57 PSI!!

My 2 cents . . .
 

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2005 K1200LT
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FWIW my Smartire system gives me tire temperature and on a hot day 158 degrees is not unusual. I have seen it up around 180 with a heavy load. Rear wheel temp is more from the tire than anything else.
 

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Tires are cured at 350 to 400 degrees. 180 should not be an issue and is likely normal considering that's where some of the engine heat goes. When you consider how the airflow passes around the bike, that rear tire and wheel is going to absorb much more heat than the front.
 

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It is my opinion that all the LT rear wheels run hot due to lack of good air flow, final drive heat, and the rear brake.
My rear wheel has always had a coat of brake dust on it, even if I hardly use the brake at all. It seems like the pads have a little drag in them by design.
Don't know why that is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replys everyone. Just wanted to be sure that I didn't have an issue that I needed to look into before it became a problem.
The dust on the wheel was my main concern, because I wouldn't for sure it was brake dust.
 

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dfinazzo said:
Running down the highway with me and my pillion aboard at 80 mph when it is 90 degrees on
asphalt road my rear tire temperture can run anywhere from 160 to 170 F and when pulling my
Unigo trailer they it gets up to 180 fegrees F running Bridgestone bias ply tires I use a
Smarttire TPM that gives temp and pressure both. The sensor is mounted via a strap on the
wheel rim thus it is quite possible that with the addition of the horsepower going thru the gear
drive that the wheel really gets up there in temperature.

The front tire usually get no hotter that 140 F.

I called a Bridgestone Tire Engineer on this and he had no problem witht the tire getting up to
180 degrees F. I get a little nervous and usually drop down from 80 mph and the tire pressure
and temperature both drop slightly. As a point of reference I fill the rear tire to 48 PSI when cold
and when the pressure gets up the pressure rises to about 56 to 57 PSI!!

My 2 cents . . .

+1

I get the same thing here in FL.

Rear temp goes up to 150+
Front temp to 104-110+

Not sure if this is an airflow issue as I can imagine that there is plenty of air moving around both the front and rear, but I could be wrong...
 

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the gears in the FD generate a lot of heat and heat is generated in the rear tire because the HP needed to overcome the wind resistance is applied to the road thru the rear tire - doubling speed requires 4 times the horse power
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My issue isn't with the tire temps, it's the wheel temp. I haven't checked the temp of the tire. I'm sure it's like Gary said, the FD generates a lot of heat and it's transmitted thru to the wheel & tire.
 

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bamarider said:
My issue isn't with the tire temps, it's the wheel temp. I haven't checked the temp of the tire. I'm sure it's like Gary said, the FD generates a lot of heat and it's transmitted thru to the wheel & tire.
do you mean the temp of the metal wheel?

Why would the temp of the wheel be of concern?

Just curious..
 
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