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I read somewhere in here about the stock rear shock preloader "losing" oil over a period of time.
The easy fix was to unwind the adjuster completely,remove the preloader and top up the fluid.
While I had my bike apart this weekend, I checked the preloader and sure enough, I could screw it down almot half way before feeling resistance.
I cracked off the line, removed the reservoir and topped it up. After reinstall, no difference, even after making sure that there was no air in the system.
I slackened off the adjuster again, and removed the cylinder.Out of curiosity I inserted a small dia brass rod into the fill hole and pushed. Pop ! the cylinder inside retracted all the way, making room for quite a bit of oil for the top up. I reinstalled the preloader and voila! tension as soon as I started screwing it in.

Just a hint for anyone who attempts this.
 

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Hi Baz
this topic has been covered alot, what you did was exactly the right way, a timely reminder to check mine I havent done it in a while.
 

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Axle said:
Hi Baz
this topic has been covered alot, what you did was exactly the right way, a timely reminder to check mine I havent done it in a while.

I figured it might have. I just couldn't face wading through all the threads to find out.It was easier to write it!!
 

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Its time for me to do this little task again. I'm thinking about disconnecting both ends of the hose and having a stainless steel covered hose made. Think it would make a difference in how long the "top up" fix would be effective?

It seemed that the majority figured the fluid level shift was due to expansion of the hose. Might also consider alternative hose material should the hose maker :) have a recommendation.

Loren
 

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BigBadBaz said:
I figured it might have. I just couldn't face wading through all the threads to find out.It was easier to write it!!
You don't have to wade through it, just use the search function. :D
 

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BigBadBaz said:
Out of curiosity I inserted a small dia brass rod into the fill hole and pushed. Pop ! the cylinder inside retracted all the way, making room for quite a bit of oil for the top up. I reinstalled the preloader and voila! tension as soon as I started screwing it in.

Just a hint for anyone who attempts this.
I'm glad you ran this again. I need to do it and the part about retracting the cylinder is a good reminder. Thanks!
 

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Would this process work with HyperPro, Wilburs, Ohlins, etc?

I am just thinking about the future since my HyperPros are less than a year old and working like a champ.
 

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I did this earlier in the summer, but still only get resistance about 1/2 way down.
The shocks are coming off this weekend, so I will look at it again.
I don't want to hijack the thread, but, now that I have everything off, I wanted to look at how much the adjuster actually compressed the spring.I backed the adjuster all the way off and the spring plate (?) went all of the way home. At full adjustment there was about 1/4 to 3/8 of an inch compression of the spring. (With the rear wheel off of the ground).
Is this what one would expect to see or should it move more?
Any ever looked at this before?

Thanks,
Gary
 

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Gary, I don't know how 1/4 - 3/8" at the shock translates to increase in ride height but I do know that with the adjuster topped off per the procedure there is a significant increase in the height of the bike. I didn't measure the difference last time but it felt like close to 2". I went from flat footed to tip toes but it was ok with me as the handling improved dramatically with the stiffer suspension.

I'm ready to do it again.

Still waiting for any input on whether changing to stainless steel covered cable might help with keeping the adjustment in place longer. I have also thought about converting the rubber hose to stainless steel brakeline with flexible sections on the ends as needed. This would keep hose expansion to a minimum.

Loren
 

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Loren,
I'm no expert, but it would make sense that if the hose could not expand, that more of the pressure generated by turning down the adjuster would be transmitted to the piston. (or whatever moves the top plate against the shock)
 

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I don't think the oil goes anywhere , but I think it is the spring that is getting clapped out using up the pre-load . I changed out the spring on my front shock a few years ago , with the front there is no pre-load on the spring as assembled . You don't need to compress the spring to take it apart . If the rear is the same , it wouldn't take much of a collapse to the spring to use up the pre-load . If it was leaking , it would show with dirt & oil on it .
 

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GlennM86 said:
Would this process work with HyperPro, Wilburs, Ohlins, etc?

I am just thinking about the future since my HyperPros are less than a year old and working like a champ.
When I bought the Ohlins a year ago from Dan Kyle, I asked him if the adjuster would need refilling. He didn't understand what I was asking. I told him about the refill procedure necessary to keep the rear shock rebounding properly. He asked where the oil went. I replied that there were no leaks, no puddles of oil, it was just gone, vaporized maybe. Dan told me, "No. The adjuster will not ever need to be refilled."

I can't say if that's the case for Wilburs or HyperPros. No experience with them.
 

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Gary, thanks for the reply.

And then the next 2 posts come in. One blaming the OE springs claiming they compress and the other the OE shock assembly (replaced with after market shock assembly)which would, of course, include the OE spring! There are one or more threads where the general agreement was that the hose expanded internally causing the oil level to drop

There are also those on this site who advocate changing out the springs and using the OE shock.

For those who have gone to aftermarket springs do you still have to add oil to the adjuster?

If the OE shock isn't leaking fluid and changing the OE springs for aftermarket springs obviates the need to add oil then the weak OE springs would likely be the problem.

I need new springs!

Loren
 
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