BMW Luxury Touring Community banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,954 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Replaced the rear pads with thanks to Pete Van ****'s well illustrated post but also planned to replace the rotor (heavily scored) with a new EBC. It's a '00, K1200LT

Had to use an easy-out on one of the screws but finally removed it w/o damage to the tapped hole.

Now my issue is removing the ABS ring. Prior posts called for penetrating fluid and then perhaps a stint in the freezer to break it loose but can't believe that the three screws with just a piece of the head flange held the ring on the rotor.

Anyway, check the photos and verify that I just need to break the bond at the arrows. Afraid to tap it with a hammer for fear of damaging the ring.

What next?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,104 Posts
I froze mine, applied a bit of heat to the ring with a blow torch and pried it off with a couple of flat screwdrivers, no real pressure, it will come off,
 

·
Enjoy The Ride
Joined
·
3,994 Posts
I heat the ABS ring with my propane torch & use a puller to remove it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,954 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
OK it's in the freezer now and just returned from the NAPA store with Blue Loctite and some penetrating spay.

If the freezer doesn't do it. I'll light it up. Don't have a gear puller that large.

Thanks guys. :bmw:
 

·
Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
Joined
·
14,420 Posts
I pried mine off with a brake spoon. Just a little at a time as I worked my way around it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,954 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
PMitchell said:
Replaced the rear pads with thanks to Pete Van ****'s well illustrated post but also planned to replace the rotor (heavily scored) with a new EBC. It's a '00, K1200LT

Had to use an easy-out on one of the screws but finally removed it w/o damage to the tapped hole.

Now my issue is removing the ABS ring. Prior posts called for penetrating fluid and then perhaps a stint in the freezer to break it loose but can't believe that the three screws with just a piece of the head flange held the ring on the rotor.

Anyway, check the photos and verify that I just need to break the bond at the arrows. Afraid to tap it with a hammer for fear of damaging the ring.

What next?
I lit it up with a propane torch after allowing the penetrant to penetrate. (is that proper English?)

Used a couple of large Craftsman screwdrivers and pried it off working it around and around on a flipped over 5 gal plastic pail. That ring was tighter than my first girl friend!!! :rotf:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,474 Posts
PMitchell said:
I lit it up with a propane torch after allowing the penetrant to penetrate. (is that proper English?)

Used a couple of large Craftsman screwdrivers and pried it off working it around and around on a flipped over 5 gal plastic pail. That ring was tighter than my first girl friend!!! :rotf:
I needed to apply heat to the three screws holding the ring on there, and they popped right out. Was lucky to have a large enough 3 legged puller, and I had two large flat bladed drivers in my hands, and buddy one in his and we just pulled the ring off very slow. We too sprayed a liberal amount of pentrating oil on it, and stopped part way through to apply more. Took 2 hours start to finish for the whole job. I recon we could do another in 30 minutes just so long as nothing sticks.

Buddy with a 2004 has the worst rattle I've heard, so may be doing his in a few weeks time.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
206 Posts
3 jaw puller slides it right off. To assemble put the rotor in the freezer (shrinks) and warm up the ring (expands). They will literally flop together with clearance but as the heat equalizes they will work out to a negative clearance being immovable.
 

·
Old Slow Guy in A Fast Car
Joined
·
8,602 Posts
I drill about 8 or 10 1/8 inch holes in the rotor just inside the ABS ring to release the pressure. Then just used a large screw driver to pry the ABS ring off. I've done 4 or 5 this way & they all come off easy.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
I will have to try that this weekend, Stevie, unless you are going to be up this way!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
I used propane heat to soften the loctite on the screws before I even attempted to take them out. They do have locking compound on the threads.

After removal of the screws, I was able to use two bent end prybars on each side of the ring. I would work them around at 90 degree intervals, prying the ring up. The ring popped off fairly easily after about three turns. It is not pressed on, but rather a very close slip-fit. This is why you need to work around the ring to take it off. If it gets cocked, you need to straighten it out before you continue to pry it off.

Make sure you have a plastic or hard rubber hammer to tap it onto the new disc. Soft taps around perimeter of the ring worked for me and not a dent was made on the ABS ribs. Also make sure the ring is completely bottomed on the hub. Then take the 3 screws and apply blue locktite and screw them into the hub.

My new EBC rotor works like a charm! NO noise, great stopping power, and easy to install. Best of all...EBC Rotor and pads cost me about $200 vs. $475 for a 'new' OEM rotor.

:bmw:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,954 Posts
Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
LJSMITH1 said:
I used propane heat to soften the loctite on the screws before I even attempted to take them out. They do have locking compound on the threads.

After removal of the screws, I was able to use two bent end prybars on each side of the ring. I would work them around at 90 degree intervals, prying the ring up. The ring popped off fairly easily after about three turns. It is not pressed on, but rather a very close slip-fit. This is why you need to work around the ring to take it off. If it gets cocked, you need to straighten it out before you continue to pry it off.

Make sure you have a plastic or hard rubber hammer to tap it onto the new disc. Soft taps around perimeter of the ring worked for me and not a dent was made on the ABS ribs. Also make sure the ring is completely bottomed on the hub. Then take the 3 screws and apply blue locktite and screw them into the hub.

My new EBC rotor works like a charm! NO noise, great stopping power, and easy to install. Best of all...EBC Rotor and pads cost me about $200 vs. $475 for a 'new' OEM rotor.

:bmw:
+1
Never had the cowbell or squeeks. Thought I would hear grinding if I was eating up the pads but nooo!
Ended up replacing the rotor and all pads.
Brakes were replaced @26K at CCR Osage Beach MO (2007 "wrench day") (BMW OEM)

Originals had 26K and still had the 50% thickness. Wonder if BMW changed their supplier?
Super stops now! :)

Visual inspection is the way to go. :bmw:
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
493 Posts
Might just be me, but the uneven wear on the pads indicates a possible caliper problem with unequal pressure on either side of the rotor. Be sure to recheck the pad wear regularly to stay ahead of this.

Happy Riding,
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,954 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
dglenn1 said:
Might just be me, but the uneven wear on the pads indicates a possible caliper problem with unequal pressure on either side of the rotor. Be sure to recheck the pad wear regularly to stay ahead of this.

Happy Riding,
Yup, thought that was unusual wear in less than a year when I replaced the rear tire.

Will inspect often for wear.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
dglenn1 said:
Might just be me, but the uneven wear on the pads indicates a possible caliper problem with unequal pressure on either side of the rotor. Be sure to recheck the pad wear regularly to stay ahead of this.

Happy Riding,
Dan, Paul,
Last night I just happened to watch the weep hole video and during that video John mentions that uneven wear on the pads you also noticed. He even makes a point of making sure that you put the pads back to the correct location, inside pads seem to wear out sooner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
461 Posts
Quick and easy encoder ring removal
1. heat allen head screws to kill locktite
2. use hacksaw with blade installed upside down through center hole of old brake disc to
cut 2 release slots 180 degs apart
3. smack with soft item to sperate

Bob G
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,595 Posts
johnbaker15 said:
Dan, Paul,
Last night I just happened to watch the weep hole video and during that video John mentions that uneven wear on the pads you also noticed. He even makes a point of making sure that you put the pads back to the correct location, inside pads seem to wear out sooner.
My error it was the brake bleeding video.
 

·
Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
Joined
·
14,420 Posts
dglenn1 said:
Might just be me, but the uneven wear on the pads indicates a possible caliper problem with unequal pressure on either side of the rotor. Be sure to recheck the pad wear regularly to stay ahead of this.

Happy Riding,
Not necessarily. In my experience on cars and bikes it seems like the inner pads always wear faster. In the LT's case the rotor floats and in most autos the caliper floats. Not sure why it is almost always the inner pads that wear out first.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top