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Discussion Starter #1
Greetings - I am changing the rear brake pads on my 1999 Lt using the instructions found on this site. I'm having trouble getting the pistons to move back to make room for the new pads. I've tried pushing the pistons back with my fingers but there is no movement - the little round tops in the pistons are very loose and fall out but no piston movement that I can tell.
I've seen references to using the bleeders to remove fluid or using the old pads to lever the pistons back. I haven't tried either approach. Seeking advice. Thanks
 

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open bleed valve

I was able to push mine in by hand after opening the bleed valve...

i just opened the bleeder and with the caliper still installed was able to push back the pistons. You can use a pair of waterpump pliers and an old pad to push them back as well..

I don't think you can force the fluid backwards thru the system.


HTH

John
 

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2005 K1200LT
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Actually you can push the fluid back as that is how they fill it at the factory. The pistons are most likely a bit dirty and will eventually push back. Try with the old pads in and the caliper unbolted - rock it back and forth on the rotor. That should do it. Once you get them moving they will go easy.
 

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I haven't done my brake pads yet so I'm not sure if you can fit one in there but I have been able to use a c-clamp on automotive brakes before.

Good Luck,
Kevin
 

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Utopian said:
Greetings - I am changing the rear brake pads on my 1999 Lt using the instructions found on this site. I'm having trouble getting the pistons to move back to make room for the new pads. I've tried pushing the pistons back with my fingers but there is no movement - the little round tops in the pistons are very loose and fall out but no piston movement that I can tell.
I've seen references to using the bleeders to remove fluid or using the old pads to lever the pistons back. I haven't tried either approach. Seeking advice. Thanks
Make sure there is room in the system. If the brake was topped off and it's full there may not be any room in the reservoir. If there is then you should be able to put a flat blade screw driver between the old pad and the rotor.. force back the piston... very slowly and carefully and evenly.... make sure that the both old pads are still in the calipers otherwise you will blow out the pistons on the other side. Not good... ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ok - while trying to bleed a bit of fluid to move the pistons I found that the brake fluid is the color of weak coffee - so I need to replace the brake fluid.
I've seen posts here for bleeding the intregral/EVO systems. What's the procedure for the 99LT?
 

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Utopian said:
Ok - while trying to bleed a bit of fluid to move the pistons I found that the brake fluid is the color of weak coffee - so I need to replace the brake fluid.
I've seen posts here for bleeding the intregral/EVO systems. What's the procedure for the 99LT?
Here is the start of a thread spelling out the procedure for brake fluid work. HTH - it wuz in the HOW/FAQ pages.
 

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I use the old pad/leverage approach. If rocking the caliper while still over the rotor doesn't do it I use a couple of large screw drivers to pry between the old pads and seperate them. Mine got very hard to seperate a couple of pad changes ago and it finally became obvious the pistons were sticking and required repair or replacement of the caliper.
 

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Richard,
Since you have a 99, you can just let gravity do the bleeding for you. It may take a few extra minutes, but just remove the master cylinder cover, take a paper towel and remove the old fluid, fill the master cylinder up with fresh fluid, open a bleeder, and wait until the fluid comes out clear. Just remember to keep your eye on the master cylinder so that it does not run out of fluid.
 

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Rear brake pads

I would not be so quick to push the pads back. It seems that dust seals are no longer fitted so any crud will stick on the piston - this crud will also stop you pushing the pistons back. Take the old pads out then remove the caliper. Have a look round and see if there is any build up round the pistons. I used an old toothbrush and green scourer with alloy wheel cleaner to remove this and then washed all residue of. If they are really dirty I would put the pads back in (to stop the pistons coming all the way out and use an old pad as packing if you are worried) and gently press the brake pedal so you see more of the piston. Apply silicone grease to the pistons and then push them back in. It is easier to use a F clamp. Reattach the brake caliper using copper grease on the bolts and copper grease on the back of the new pads. Riding my bike through the winter may cause most of my problems so maybe not needed required across the pond.
 
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