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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have 9800 miles on my EBC rear brake pads and could not believe the pad was worn nearly to the metal (attached). Both pads wore evenly and my fuel mileage averages 47 MPG in town. Is this typical mileage on a set of rear brake pads?

When road testing my work, I heard what sounded like a grinding noise when using the rear brake. Braking stop distance did not feel impacted. I did not hear any grinding noise when NOT using the rear brake while riding. While rotating the rear wheel on the center stand, the tire would rotate normally (no resistance) for approximately 75% of a rotation then slow with a noise like the pad was making contact with the rotor.

Is the partial rotor drag issue normal until the rear pads wear to the rotor or do you all think I have a warped rotor?

Rob, 2000LT
Navarre, FL
 

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Sorry, I don't have mileage data, just an impression of rear brake wear.
I have 96K miles on my 2000.

I've been through several sets of rear brake pads. (Not sure how many. I could look through my maintenace log, but I'm being lazy here. ;)

I trail brake a lot.
The brake pads wear out pretty fast.

I was down to the metal with a scored rotor the first time I realized that the wear rate exceeded my expectations.

Since then, I check the pads more frequently and generally have an extra sent in the garage.

I have been using the EBC EE pads (if my memory serves me well).

I wouldn't be concerned. Just change 'em out and then don't forget about 'em. ;)
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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On a stock rotor with stock pads I would get about 25-30 K out of a set. I did go through the next set in less than 10 K and took the stock rotor to the limits. I switched to a used EBC rotor (gift) and sintered pads about 31 K ago and still going strong. Looks like you are running organics (which is what was OEM). One other item I have always seen (on other LTs as well), the inner pad always was thinner than the outer pad was.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What indications are there when a stock rotor has reached its "limits"? My LT has 115,000 miles.

Rob, 2000LT
Navarre, FL
 

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What indications are there when a stock rotor has reached its "limits"? My LT has 115,000 miles.

Rob, 2000LT
Navarre, FL
If you have the OEM REAR rotor from factory (NOT 3rd party rotor like EBC), the NEW thickness is 7mm (0.28 inch) and the MINIMUM specs is 6.5mm (0.26 inch). Obviously there is a margin where things would still be safe just a bit below 6.5, but given the size of the rear Caliper and weight of the bike, I would NOT push my luck too far.

For the FRONT rotors, the specs are much different: NEW is 5.0mm (0.197 inch) and MINIMUM is 4.5mm (0.177 inch)

NOTE that all these values are published both in BMW shop-manual and the CLYMER manual, HOWEVER in 1st edition of CLYMER there is an omission for the REAR rotors Specs in chapter for ABSII models. They may have corrected this in later editions.
 

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Even if your rear rotor still has an acceptable thickness, it may be loose enough to be causing excess drag on the pads and creating extra wear. The factory rear rotors are notorious for developing slop that results in the "cowbell" noise when you hit a bump or screeching when you apply the rear brakes. If any of this sounds familiar you need to replace the rear rotor with the EBC part. There is a great video on how to do it on the Illinois BMW Riders
 
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