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Discussion Starter #1
I have been stalking this forum for the last couple of months - oddly enough that is about the time I bought a 2000 K12LT-I (30k miles)
OK, so rear break pads need replacing and based on what I have read on this forum it sounded like a pretty straight forward proposition.
Removal went very smoothly but I ran into trouble attempting to installing the new pads as I am not able to push the pistons back in to accommodate the thicker new pads.I have not whipped out the channel locks to try to force them in but by god I sure thought about it.
What have I not done to allow these bad boys to move?
 

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Dan,

Something to think about when working on any brakes, when you use those pliers to push the pistons back you will also be pushing fluid back into the brake system. That means in this case that the fluid has to go somewhere, back into the ABS and the the reservoir. Think crappy old fluid back into those units. :(

Another way to get better results would be to crack open the bleed valve while compressing the piston, the fluid comes out the valve and into your container of choice. If you have speed bleeders (http://www.speedbleeder.com/) installed you will not have to worry about air in the brake system.

Good luck, and have fun. :wave
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks John,
I may not know whole lot about breaks but I do know enough not to force these bad boys back into position.
I'll crack open the bleeders as you suggest. Any suggestions on minimizing the chance of introducing air into systems or is it a given that I will. - no speed bleeders.
Dan
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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Spray a little Brake Kleen in there first. You should be able to use the old pads to lever the pistons back in. Slide one in all the way and then the other one halfway in and pry. Any excess fluid will comeout of the reservoir vent line so watch for it.
Oh I looked at the photo - reinstall the caliper on the bike so you can use the rotor as a pry point for the second pad. No need to remove it to change pads.
 

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jzeiler said:
Spray a little Brake Kleen in there first. You should be able to use the old pads to lever the pistons back in. Slide one in all the way and then the other one halfway in and pry. Any excess fluid will comeout of the reservoir vent line so watch for it.
Oh I looked at the photo - reinstall the caliper on the bike so you can use the rotor as a pry point for the second pad. No need to remove it to change pads.
This was exactly the method I used when I changed my pads. Worked like a charm. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys - You got me back on track despite my greatest efforts to make this as difficult as possible. A shot of break kleen and a little leverage was all I needed.
 

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Caper11 said:
This was exactly the method I used when I changed my pads. Worked like a charm. :)
+1

Last year I replaced rear and front and used the "brute force" method to spread to old brake pads apart.

also I used break cleaner on the front because they were sticking.
 
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