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My "new" 2000 K1200LTC appears to be dragging the rear brake a bit and heating the rear end. I first noticed the final was fairly hot to the touch after a ride (not sizzle, rear drive fluid measured < 120 degrees), while the front was cool. The disk is hotter than the final, rear drive fluid is clean, so I believe brakes are the source of the heat buildup. On the center stand the rear wheel spins, coasts a 1/4 turn with a light push, but there's more friction than the front and I think I can hear the pads touching. The previous owner had the rear disk and pads changed a few thousand miles ago while the fronts were left alone, so I suspect this has been a chronic problem.

I have yet to check the master cylinder gap to the brake pedal to be sure it's not too tight, but I suspect the calipers could be sticking. My question is; the service manual says to drain the brake fluid to remove the caliper for inspection, is this necessary or can you plug the line and deal with the air bubble later? Or is it easier to just drain the thing? Fortunately, the brakes on a 2000 aren't linked front to rear.

Wayne
 

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I think that what you are finding is normal. While it is on the center stand, unless you are feeling resistance in turning the wheel, I say that it is normal. You can try pushing the pads back in with a screw driver and see what happens. My rear caliper gets hot after driving a short distance than the front.
 

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I'm also thinking you probably are pretty normal. The rear end, rotor and caliper run very hot. I have seen rear end at 160 degrees running on the interstate in 100 degree weather.

Front tire runs significantly cooler.
 
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