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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Someone on the shock life expectancy post reminded me of this and I realized I needed to do it.. Took only about 15 minutes and helped my ride height tremendously. I had less than half the adjustment available to me.

1. Crank the preload all the way down to the stop. That's Counterclockwise..
Put the bike up on the center stand. This unloads the shock.

2. Unbolt the preload adjuster from the pivot mechanism and turn it hose up.
Notice now which way the hose is pointed on the bottom of the adjuster.

3. I used a 10" Crescent to hold the preload adjuster bracket while I backed out the banjo bolt at the bottom. (Watch out for the crush washers, You don't want to loose one at this time. )

4. The hose will naturally point up when it comes off the adjuster. Leave it pointing up so no oil will leak out.

5. With the preload adjuster all the way counterclockwise and upside down, Take a smooth tool and insert it into the hole where the banjo bolt was attached and push the plunger all the way in to the stop. Don't use something sharp. I used a round ended allen wrench. The wobble type.

6. Refill the adjuster to completely full with hydraulic jack oil. Run a few drops down into the banjo bolt if any came out. I used a syringe with a wd-40 hose attached to it for this.

7. Bolt the hose back up to the adjuster loosing as little oil as you can.
This was the hardest part. With the bolt just a tiny bit loose and the whole assembly upside down, Crank in the adjuster just a little to expel any air.

8. Tighten the banjo bolt fully to seal the line. You did remember to see which way it points didn't you. ;)

9. Re-mount the adjuster on the pivot mechanism and you should be done.

10. Crank up that preload and see what you've got now.....!!! :yeah: Check for leaks !

Found the instructions for this old site and thought I'd repost it on the new because it really helps. !!:)

Take Care,

John
 

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Thanks for posting the instructions. After reading the shock lives thread I was going ahunting. This will save a lot of time. I seem to bottom out way to quick, so will try this. Need to save up my pennies for the Ohlins, maybe next year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yah, me too, Can't get new shocks and go to CCR in the same year...

Already spent way too much on farkles and such ( sorry Joe.):)

It really helped though..

Good Luck.

John
 

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tarheel_rider said:
Thanks for posting the instructions. After reading the shock lives thread I was going ahunting. This will save a lot of time. I seem to bottom out way to quick, so will try this. Need to save up my pennies for the Ohlins, maybe next year.
This will of course help the bottoming out - but only a little.

There is a guy in Canada that can re-build stock shocks for a fraction of the price of Ohlins. Apparently they are a distinct improvement over stockers, and he's been at it for some time.... I think he does some re-valving.

I personally would like a higher rated spring on my rear. (the bike, not my butt) I've found with a 125 lb. passenger, fully loaded cases and trailer I am REALLY lacking....it is so bad it definitely affects handling. The front oem shock is a horrible joke.
 

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Thanks John.... I may give this a stab this fall when it isn't so dang hot in the garage...

Can't wait for it to cool down so we can have another RTE - at least that way we know it'll rain... ;)
 

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jpspen said:
Someone on the shock life expectancy post reminded me of this and I realized I needed to do it.. Took only about 15 minutes and helped my ride height tremendously. I had less than half the adjustment available to me.

1. Crank the preload all the way down to the stop. That's Counterclockwise..
Put the bike up on the center stand. This unloads the shock.

John
To clarify: Actually, that should be stated "all the way UP to the stop". (correct that it should be all the way counterclockwise). Don't want to get anyone confused and have them loosen the banjo fitting with the adjuster cranked all the way DOWN. If they did, they would get a spray of high pressure oil.
 

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dshealey said:
To clarify: Actually, that should be stated "all the way UP to the stop". (correct that it should be all the way counterclockwise). Don't want to get anyone confused and have them loosen the banjo fitting with the adjuster cranked all the way DOWN. If they did, they would get a spray of high pressure oil.
Hey David:

I STILL want to know where the original oil went! My guess is that it was absorbed into the hose lining.... :confused:

Either that, or it went into the blinker fluid reservoir!
 

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Muffler Bearings

I think I will give this a whirl tomorrow. My whole suspension is crap, especially when I am going fast through a sweeping corner.
Does it really matter what kind of oil you use???? I read someplace that the missing oil is used by the muffler bearings... LOL...
 

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I read somewhere on the old forum to use jack oil. All of the auto parts places around here carry it and it is relatively cheap-$3-$4. You don't need much.
 

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astuber said:
I read somewhere on the old forum to use jack oil. All of the auto parts places around here carry it and it is relatively cheap-$3-$4. You don't need much.
Yep, jack oil is fine, as is motor oil, Dexron, front fork oil, 90 wt. About anything petroleum based and available. The only thing the oil does is take up space. It has no lube or cooling duties so just about anything will work.


Gooid Luck
 

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tvguy said:
I think I will give this a whirl tomorrow. My whole suspension is crap, especially when I am going fast through a sweeping corner.
Does it really matter what kind of oil you use???? I read someplace that the missing oil is used by the muffler bearings... LOL...
Refilling the adjuster will not have any affect on the suspension feel unless it is so low that you cannot adjust the bike up any. The adjuster does nothing but push down on the top of the spring to load it harder, raising the bike up a little. It has nothing to do with the action of the shock itself.

The type of oil in the adjuster is not critical at all, since it is used in a static condition, and does not contact any parts that move during riding. You could use jack oil, automatic transmission fluid, or light motor oil. I used refrigeration compressor oil when I did mine, that was the light oil I happened to have on hand.
 

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Maybe it's psychological but, even though I still had some adjustment left, refilling the pre-load adjuster made a significant impact on my suspension.
 

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Read that the piston has to be pushed down into the tube to make room for the new oil. Understandable, but no mention as to how long this pushrod needs to be.....Also what diameter would be too large? Somewhere I read use a nyon rod. Now where would I find that? Why not use a small diameter screwdriver, clean of course?

Went out and backed off my adjuster all the way then started back down. No resistance until the 7th click was reached. I assume this is enough it would be an improvement?
 

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I used a small diameter phillips screwdrive to push the plate down-it doesn't take much pressure. It only needs be be 3-4 inches long. It may take several times, with a rest period between the pushes, to get it to fully bottom out.
 

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Mobile 1

Thanks for the info Dave. I am going to tear in to it in a little bit.
I have lots of Mobile 1 synthetic laying around... That should be good I hope.

Jeff
 

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OK in an attempt to beat this one to death....I don't like to get into mechanical things I can't see several steps ahead in.......It looks like the adjuster is held to the pivot point with one allen bolt. When the adjuster is laid over so that the seat will close I can see the banjo (why is it called that, whatever) bolt and hose. Now, I know why I should remove the adjuster etc.........so the oil won't run out silly!

QUESTI0N: Seems it would be much easier to loosen the banjo bolt, just a little bit, before removing the adjuster from the pivot. Would I loose (spill) oil if I did this? Also seems that the final tightening of the banjo bolt at the end of service would be easier if done after the adjuster is re-installed. Does this make sense or would it be better to just follow the instructions that initiated this thread? Hey, I think I can do this one!
 
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