BMW Luxury Touring Community banner
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2009RT and just had the fuel strip replaced at the dealer. Ever since there has been a rattle which seems to be coming from the left side lower front of the tupperware. I have tired to find it, but unable. Any suggestions of what it might be?

Thanks

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
1.) Obviously check for missing/loose screws.

2.) See if power is present on the left-hand side power outlet. I have almost forgotten to plug the connector back in before re-assembly.

3.) Is the air temp indicator working? Another possibility of a loose connector. Or the sensor is hanging in the fairing by the leads.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
905 Posts
Hammam said:
Come on, dealers, wake up! This should definitely not happen. How about a little pep talk to your mechanics?
Well said. To me, this is completely unacceptable. I'm not a mechanic by profession and this has never happened on any motorcycle I have ever worked on - ever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
steveaikens said:
Well said. To me, this is completely unacceptable. I'm not a mechanic by profession and this has never happened on any motorcycle I have ever worked on - ever.
And that'd be because you're the one who's riding the bike. You care that it's safe for you and your passenger(s). There are some really good dealer techs out there, but they're becoming a rare breed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
747 Posts
I agree that a lot of so-called professional work is sloppy (about 1/3 in my experience) but learn to have a little sympathy for the guys doing the work. When you're in your own shop, you work at your own pace and are free of distractions except any you allow. The guy at the dealership is under time pressure, gets interrupted, etc etc so doesn't have the advantages you do. Remember, the guy with the wrenches is coping with everything that comes in that front door and that can range from the silly simple to the incredibly difficult and he's only getting paid for his work which is tiny part of the bill you get....

When you find a good shop make sure you know WHO does your work and let them know you appreciate their efforts. One of the less thrilling things about being a mechanic is working without a lot of direct human interaction and I think you'll find many of the guys appreciate a favorable comment or two. Besides, you can learn a whole bunch by asking a few well thought questions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,047 Posts
racer7 said:
I agree that a lot of so-called professional work is sloppy (about 1/3 in my experience) but learn to have a little sympathy for the guys doing the work. When you're in your own shop, you work at your own pace and are free of distractions except any you allow. The guy at the dealership is under time pressure, gets interrupted, etc etc so doesn't have the advantages you do. Remember, the guy with the wrenches is coping with everything that comes in that front door and that can range from the silly simple to the incredibly difficult and he's only getting paid for his work which is tiny part of the bill you get....

When you find a good shop make sure you know WHO does your work and let them know you appreciate their efforts. One of the less thrilling things about being a mechanic is working without a lot of direct human interaction and I think you'll find many of the guys appreciate a favorable comment or two. Besides, you can learn a whole bunch by asking a few well thought questions.
Well said. Unfortunately, remember that the job of the service writer is to insulate the customer from the guy who is actually doing the work. We've all seen these "Insurance regulations prohibit customers in the shop" BS signs that are designed to allow the $30/hour mechanic to work on three $75/hour repair jobs simultaneously (you think you're not being billed for the time the oil is draining from the crankcase? Think again, and that mechanic isn't sitting around watching it drain). And to insulate the mechanic from actually passing on information that the shop could keep to itself and bill you for. So in a shop of any significant size the possibility of actually being able to interact with the guy doing the work is actively discouraged.

It's not just motorcycles, it happens in auto repair shops as well. That's why I go to an independent where I get to deal with the owner, who is also the main wrench.

I understand that it's a business. But so much more could be acheived with a little consideration for customer happiness. Most of us have a lot of personal investment in our bikes and don't treat them as black boxes.

OK, off soapbox for a while.

JayJay
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top