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I missed the Tech Day at my local BMW club, the Lone Star BMW Riders, due to work so ended up working on my R1200RT at the house over the past several days. I enjoy working on my motorcycles and like to change oil and filter regularly and all of the filters and fluids once a year.

I have had several BMW airheads in the past and I recently owned a K1200LT before
purchasing my 2008 R1200RT this past year so I used to BMW "nuances".

Here are a couple of tips owners of R1200 hexheads may find helpful:

1. R1200 maintenance DVD from JVB productions (available from either
www.jimvonbaden.com or beemerboneyard.com ) is really a good DVD for step by
step instructions and tips. His web site has updates that are helpful -- I did
not realize until I got into the brake flush that my 2008 RT was a whole lot
simpler than the old ABS unit flush on R1200 bikes earlier than 7/2006. I also have a
BMW service manual on DVD that I got off of eBay that is a must have.

2. I purchased the 12/24K Super Maintenance kit from www.beemerboneyard.com
which is a really nice all in one kit that includes engine oil (either regular
or synthetic, depending on the kit you choose), transmission/final drive
synthetic fluid, oil and air filters, all O rings (including the ones for the
gas tank disconnect hoses) and crush washers needed (and even the 2 inner valve
valve cover gaskets, you know, the black round ones), and four Bosch spark plugs
for $137.95 (that's the price for the synthetic oil, it's cheaper for regular
oil).

3. I also got the Wurth hexhead valve adjustment feeler guage set from
beemerboneyard.com which comes with two .15 and two .30 feelers. I had previously purchased a oil filter tool and a spark plug puller tool from A&S BMW.

4. i like to flush my brake fluid once a year so I installed Speed Bleeder on
each of the two front calipers and one Speed Bleeder for the rear caliper. Go
to www.speedbleeder.com for the chart for your bike and also get the Speed
Bleeder bag which looks like a IV bag. The bag comes with a hose which connects
on the Speed Bleeder and makes the brake flush a one man easy job. I use a
clean plastic syringe (available from auto parts store) to drain out the old
fluid just above the bottom hole and then pour in Valvoline Synthetic Dot 3 & 4
brake fluid. When you open the cap off the fluid use a small screwdriver to put
two small holes (at the "top" and "bottom" of the aluminum foil liner under the
screw cap) in the foil under the screw cap to make pouring the brake fluid more
controllable. If use just remove the foil completely, the pouring is harder to
control. Also, I usually use masking tape around the front reservoir just below
the cap and put plenty of plastic or foil on the bike to prevent any drips of
brake fluid onto the bike, particularly painted surfaces.

5. I use Honda Moly 60 paste on the rear drive spline and "U joint" when I was
changing out the rear drive fluid.

6. Installed the ZTechnic 4002 slip on silencer that beemerboneyard.com has on sale. Needed to use a Harbor Freight tailpipe expander (the large one) to fit the inlet of the silencer to the outlet of the catalytic converter pipe. No big deal. The Z silencer is stainless steel, looks great and sounds good. With baffle in, about the same decibel level as stock.

7. Finished everything, checked with throttle sync with my trusty Twin Max and
put the body panels back on.

8. Froze hands when I wash the RT and waxed her. :bmw:
 

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All the fluids once a year?
talk about overkill, wouldn't want to pick up a used bike from you, the screws and bolts would be wore out
You must not have any cable
 

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I have a 2006 R1200RT.
Your notes (guide) were very thorough and much appreciated. Thanks for the detail and the links.

I have more time to work on my bike and your notes provide a great starting point.

Thanks!

urmobile
 

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Discussion Starter #4
mwood7800 said:
All the fluids once a year?
talk about overkill, wouldn't want to pick up a used bike from you, the screws and bolts would be wore out
You must not have any cable
I wouldn't call spending about $150 and a pleasant day in the garage changing fluids and filters on an expensive machine once a year as "overkill". But then again, I have ridden my motorcycles many thousands of miles over the years without being stranded from a breakdown.

I guess I belong to the "ounce of prevention" school. Synthetic gear oil, synthetic brake fluid, Honda Moly 60, and filters are cheap. Failing parts and breakdowns are not. :bmw:
 

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westcott360 said:
I missed the Tech Day at my local BMW club, the Lone Star BMW Riders, due to work so ended up working on my R1200RT at the house over the past several days. I enjoy working on my motorcycles and like to change oil and filter regularly and all of the filters and fluids once a year.
....

8. Froze hands when I wash the RT and waxed her. :bmw:
a couple questions:
Do you use a speed bleeder on the clutch system?

Which DVD did you get from eBay? I have seen a few. Who produces them? I've seen the JVB one, but that can be ordered from his website.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Ponch said:
a couple questions:
Do you use a speed bleeder on the clutch system?

Which DVD did you get from eBay? I have seen a few. Who produces them? I've seen the JVB one, but that can be ordered from his website.
Ponch, I did purchase a Speed Bleeder for the clutch system and the special mineral oil used in the BMW clutch system (the mineral oil from Beemerboneyard.com) but I decided to wait to flush the clutch system because the BMW service manual shows the change/flush of the clutch system opposite of the normal brake flush. In other words, you use a syringe to empty out most of the old mineral fluid out of the clutch reservoir and then you use another syringe full of new mineral oil with a hose attached to the clutch bleeder "valve" on the engine to push the mineral fluid back through the clutch fluid hose from the bleeder on the engine to the clutch reservoir. It would be like using a syringe to flush brake fluid from the brake caliper up to the reservoir (which I've see done to push up a frustrating air bubble that could not be dislodged using the standard flush technique). I need to get more information to make sure it is okay to flush the clutch system downward (in which case a Speed Bleeder would be used) or whether you have to flush "upward" from the bleeder valve to the clutch reservoir (in which case a Speed Bleeder could not be used because of the check valve).

The BMW service manual on DVD on offered by a number of individuals on eBay and is available from BMW dealers like A&S. I'm am not sure who produces those. :bmw:
 

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FYI- the clutch circuit uses mineral oil and has a very extended service interval. It just does not need service. Leave it alone.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
hopz said:
FYI- the clutch circuit uses mineral oil and has a very extended service interval. It just does not need service. Leave it alone.
Heard that before. That's what the Toyota service department said about the "lifetime" fluid in my Toyota truck about a year before I started having transmission slippage. I had requested the fluid change because I was pulling a trailer regularly. Toyota decided at some point to have "sealed" transmissions and it was a major pain (and expense) to flush the transmission oil. Because of the expense to flush a sealed transmission and based on what the service department was telling me, I let it go. When I started getting slippage, I traded in the truck.

How many months or how many miles count as "extended service"? Having worked my way through college as a mechanic in the distant past, I am skeptical of "sealed" and "lifetime" when it comes to motorcycles, trucks and cars. I know synthetic fluids are substantially superior to lubricating products of 15 to 20 years ago but moisture, heat, cold and wear will degrade any product over time. BMW has changed its position on this because they are making changing out gear oil in the final drive easier than in the past.

My plan to discuss the issue with a BMW mechanic and get the pros and cons of "leaving it alone" versus a flush with new mineral oil. Based on the BMW service manual it a fairly easy flush and mineral oil is cheap. :bmw:
 

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westcott360 said:
Heard that before. That's what the Toyota service department said about the "lifetime" fluid in my Toyota truck about a year before I started having transmission slippage. I had requested the fluid change because I was pulling a trailer regularly. Toyota decided at some point to have "sealed" transmissions and it was a major pain (and expense) to flush the transmission oil. Because of the expense to flush a sealed transmission and based on what the service department was telling me, I let it go. When I started getting slippage, I traded in the truck.

How many months or how many miles count as "extended service"? Having worked my way through college as a mechanic in the distant past, I am skeptical of "sealed" and "lifetime" when it comes to motorcycles, trucks and cars. I know synthetic fluids are substantially superior to lubricating products of 15 to 20 years ago but moisture, heat, cold and wear will degrade any product over time. BMW has changed its position on this because they are making changing out gear oil in the final drive easier than in the past.

My plan to discuss the issue with a BMW mechanic and get the pros and cons of "leaving it alone" versus a flush with new mineral oil. Based on the BMW service manual it a fairly easy flush and mineral oil is cheap. :bmw:
Nothing is truly lifetime. For instance, my VW uses Pentosin G12 coolant. Supposed to be lifetime, but in reality, gets changed when the timing belt gets done as anyone with half a brain changes the water pump as well. In fact a timing belt kit comes with the water pump and associates stuff like thermostat, thermostat housing etc. I will say the block was rust free when I did the timing belt, so the stuff is good, but it will get changed sooner or later.
 
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