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Hey guys, I am no mechanic so forgive the question. Just got my r1200rt back from oil, drive train fluid change. They also did synchronisation. Whatever that is. Picked it up just before they close for the weekend.

If I honk on it in anyway it sputters and almost dies before it reluctantly kicks in.

What is likely the problem?


Also should your brake fluid reservoir have a visible air bubble?

Thanks Fred
 

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Assuming that it has oil in the crankcase and gear oil in the final drive, that just leaves the throttle synchronization. The throttles are synchronized to make the cylinders each do the same amount of work. The bike runs smoother and cleaner. What they should do is attach vacuum gauges to each of the throttle intake tubes and adjust as necessary so that when the throttle is opened each cylinder gets the same amount of air.

I would think that the stumble you describe could be caused by an imbalance.
Take it back to the dealer.
 

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I would make a quick check of the throttle cables where they attach to the throttle bodies.
It is common for one of the cables to not get seated properly into the fittings right at the end where they attach. It is easy to bump them out of place when installing the body work.


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fhrenchuk said:
Hey guys, I am no mechanic so forgive the question. Just got my r1200rt back from oil, drive train fluid change. They also did synchronisation. Whatever that is. Picked it up just before they close for the weekend.

If I honk on it in anyway it sputters and almost dies before it reluctantly kicks in.

What is likely the problem?


Also should your brake fluid reservoir have a visible air bubble?

Thanks Fred
 

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905 Posts
hp1bmw said:
I would make a quick check of the throttle cables where they attach to the throttle bodies.
It is common for one of the cables to not get seated properly into the fittings right at the end where they attach. It is easy to bump them out of place when installing the body work.
Almost a certainty this is the problem.

The downside to this problem is the bodywork has to come off to check it. Your statement that you're no mechanic kind of implies you probably don't have the tools handy or the knowledge of how to R&R the bodywork. If that's the case, I'd suggest the quick fix is back at the dealership.

If that's your choice, they should stand behind it with no problem.

As to asking for compensation for your time - uh, no.

Lastly, if the air bubble is at the top, yes. There has to be expansion room in the reservoir. At the bottom, no.
 

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My pleasure. I'd suggest you hook up with someone local the knows these machines and let them guide you to the torx drivers you need and then how to R&R the bodywork. As time move on, you'll find a number of things you can easily do once the bodyworks is off. Looks a little tricky at first but it's really quite easy and it gives you access to a lot that you can do without the dealer.

These bikes are really easy to work on. Just takes learning how the first time.

Good luck in getting it worked out.
 
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