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Ladies and gents:
I've done a search and have both factory and Clymer manuals. I took my 01 all the way down several months ago, removed all tupperware, stingray, seats, everything. Now of course I'm completely baffled about order of re-assembly. It's all in a pile - great organization!!

I have got the coolant system all back in and filled. I have the fuel tank back in and hooked up. Does anybody have a simple "order of reassembly" for all of the plastics? I do have all screws screwed into where they go, just don't know what goes on first!

Any help appreciated - just the order would be nice! Thank you all!
 

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I'm probably one of the least qualified forum members to offer advice on this subject, but I have tons of experience taking stuff apart and reassembling it. But...I have never owned a BMW K series and certainly very little experience except for helping a friend with his '03.

My suggestion is to stage the parts by laying them out around the bike. Then, think aerodynamics as you take time to study the parts. What overlaps what? Most likely, the pieces will assemble so that they slip through the air smoothly. There will be fasteners (screws or bolts) and snap tabs where one part meshes with another. Lay your parts out, grab a comfortable chair, sit and ponder and familiarize yourself with their placement and function. Most likely, the parts will assemble back to front or have "nesting" grooves where one fits into the other.

With a little study and patience, it should all come into focus. If you make a mistake, think of it as an opportunity to gain more experience by repetition of removing & replacing. Especially if you end up with a bunch of leftover parts.:wink:
 
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Sometimes I wonder how much work will get done if I need to worry about the fairings or keeping the mirrors aling when I take them apart so they can come back together perfectly..

but I don't...


the LT is kind of strange, on a porpuse buils race bike the fairings come apart in a certain order and the process is extremely fast (win or lose speed) the LT is kind of confused, some fairing bolts are supposed to get located first but they heads are already cover it, is kind of a "Zig Zag" is not big deal is just matter of practice and figure out the "Illogical" logic

remember that fairings on a bmw are there to "pad the Book rate" for the shop, so speed is not even a concern, if fact it they are confusing to take out the more people will take the bike to the shop for the simplest of services
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I reassembled in this order:

1. rear peg assemblies
2. bottom side fairings
3. forward/reverse shifter
4. front wheel / brakes (so I could get the jack out from under the oil pan)
5. center front fairing
6. rear seat
7. front seat
8. stingray
9. upper side panels
10. whatzit box and final top screws
10. turn signals
11. tip-over guards and forward pegs
12. anything else

Worked out fine. Now I hope it will run - it hasn't in nearly 3 years.
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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A picture of the "pile" would help but absent that I'll say this. If you did not take the front fairing off or the dash then the first order is the stingray (part with the radio). Next is the "battery" covers, smaller parts under the seat then the pillion footpegs. The big body parts (left and right) would be next followed by the fairing lowers. Simple rule for screws if it goes through one layer of plastic it is the short one, two layers a longer one and the longest are for the parts that are secured by the well nuts (rubber parts mostly the bottom of the upper fairing and the top of the lower fairing. Then the last is the small part at the base of the stingray. Then the winglets under the mirrors and finally the mirrors. Last is the tip over chrome covers followed by the rubber covers.
 

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Sometimes I wonder how much work will get done if I need to worry about the fairings or keeping the mirrors aling when I take them apart so they can come back together perfectly..

but I don't...


the LT is kind of strange, on a porpuse buils race bike the fairings come apart in a certain order and the process is extremely fast (win or lose speed) the LT is kind of confused, some fairing bolts are supposed to get located first but they heads are already cover it, is kind of a "Zig Zag" is not big deal is just matter of practice and figure out the "Illogical" logic

remember that fairings on a bmw are there to "pad the Book rate" for the shop, so speed is not even a concern, if fact it they are confusing to take out the more people will take the bike to the shop for the simplest of services
I love the color ! Looks like my old LT..... Any way, if I remember correctly, you generally start at the bottom and work up...I always took mine apart before taking it into the shop.... Made it easier for them and kept me on my toes..

Don't worry about left over screws... Keep um in a jar for the next removal/replace...
 

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... I do have all screws screwed into where they go...
I also do that...especially on assemblies that I don't do often or might not get back to right away. Too often, I've seen impatient folks throw fasteners in a container and then have difficulty matching them up later. Keeping those screws "home" probably saved you a lot of work!:smile:
 

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I love the color ! Looks like my old LT..... Any way, if I remember correctly, you generally start at the bottom and work up...I always took mine apart before taking it into the shop.... Made it easier for them and kept me on my toes..

Don't worry about left over screws... Keep um in a jar for the next removal/replace...
Oh Dan, I got so very lucky...

I was looking for the cheapest running bike on craigslist (getting divorced, very little money, no tools, not much of a place to work, etc) and stumble into this LT, maybe 2 minutes after it was posted, plus I really love the color..



This is the first K-bike I ever own (I had nine Oilheads In the last 30 years) but I rode two of the old K100 on some very strenuous training (SAS Evasive, defensive training courses (Two))

Coming back to "Order"

As part of my Job I help design, engineer and build many "Speciality" vehicles (from Copters, to "Houses"), most of them they will end up oversees and since they were totally freaking custom, we did "mark" every bore/hole/nut with the characteristics of the proper fastener they require, torque's where kind of Nominal but we safety wire every single bolt so they did not need specific torque values..(permanent color markers, later laser engrave with color accents)

Another trick, we try to homogenize all the fastener to a custom size (Unless engineering require something more specific, reason....

Well when you are performing a procedure in the elements, darkness, wind, rain (something it was require) and you have 10 persons working on the vehicle, is no way to remember or keep track of anything

"OH yeah that washer goes with that Bolt with two nuts under" so having a bucket of the exact same bolt prove to be very useful and fast (Only problem, you don't have a exact count of all the fasteners and maybe one of them was left by mistake on a sensitive area (It can happen anyway)

Ps: I got super lucky and a few months back I purchase 70 pounds of "Bulk BMW bolts", mostly looking for Torx heads but I got a little out of everything, including about 12 pounds of Stainless steel fairing TORX's bolts (no idea BMW even made some, just like the black LT ones but stainless and in 6 different lengths and 2 diameters)

Ps II: Torx's bolts have been around for a long long time but with very little use on the BICYCLE Industry (disc brake rotors, crank bolts, that is about it)..

Since I'm a bike freak, I have swap most of the "strategic Robbery" bolts for Torx's in my many bicycles (not like I leave them unattended) but now bike thieves will have a much harder time just taking a stem apart to steal the forks ,etc.

prevention is not the mother of invention, but for sure is very helpful..


Now all the bolts on my LT are stainless and soon my 3 GS's will suffer the same treatment on the none structurally integral hardware of the bike
 

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Short version of a long story - I actually bought my K1200 LT in the dark and under a street light. I wasn't really sure of the color, but ended up really like the green color. Many women also came up to me and complimented me on the color and said that they were so tired of all of the black bikes. The first time it happened, I took it as a fluke, but it continued as long as I owned the bike. The green ones were pretty rare and I think, only about 5% .....
 

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Ladies and gents:
I've done a search and have both factory and Clymer manuals. I took my 01 all the way down several months ago, removed all tupperware, stingray, seats, everything. Now of course I'm completely baffled about order of re-assembly. It's all in a pile - great organization!!

I have got the coolant system all back in and filled. I have the fuel tank back in and hooked up. Does anybody have a simple "order of reassembly" for all of the plastics? I do have all screws screwed into where they go, just don't know what goes on first!

Any help appreciated - just the order would be nice! Thank you all!
Both manuals have an order of assembly. The Clymer manual is generally hard to follow as it uses the “reverse” of disassembly and jumps around from chapter to chapter. I am not sure about the factory manual as I have the factory CD. The BMW CD is very nice as it gives step by step directions for both disassembly and assembly. Just go to something deep like clutch replacement and it will lay out all the steps from start to finish. If you have a BMW paper manual, then I am not sure what is in there, but the CD is actually quite good from a sequence of operations perspective.
 

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Short version of a long story - I actually bought my K1200 LT in the dark and under a street light. I wasn't really sure of the color, but ended up really like the green color. Many women also came up to me and complimented me on the color and said that they were so tired of all of the black bikes. The first time it happened, I took it as a fluke, but it continued as long as I owned the bike. The green ones were pretty rare and I think, only about 5% .....
I never really look at them before i got mine (I did study a few of the parts to use them in other bikes)

no idea of the rarity of the green ones but for sure love mine, is a little age and UV ray faded and I will like to refushfish it a little, more to make it prettier than keep her "Original"

After the first two, three times you take the plastic the biggest issues becomes where to keep all the bulky stuff safe, but the procedure is not difficult at all..

The minute I get a garage I'm going to take her all apart, install a new clutch and all the related seals and look for a oil leak that I have no idea where is coming from..

for sure not use to that, my GS's are a "30 second to the engine" (well not my 1200) and this whole "let take two hours to touch the engine block" is a little ridiculous if you ask me
 

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I never really look at them before i got mine (I did study a few of the parts to use them in other bikes)

no idea of the rarity of the green ones but for sure love mine, is a little age and UV ray faded and I will like to refushfish it a little, more to make it prettier than keep her "Original"

After the first two, three times you take the plastic the biggest issues becomes where to keep all the bulky stuff safe, but the procedure is not difficult at all..

The minute I get a garage I'm going to take her all apart, install a new clutch and all the related seals and look for a oil leak that I have no idea where is coming from..

for sure not use to that, my GS's are a "30 second to the engine" (well not my 1200) and this whole "let take two hours to touch the engine block" is a little ridiculous if you ask me
It is a nuisance to be sure, but only takes two hours the first time. I can pretty well strip mine down in 30 minutes now. Still 30 wasted minutes, but better than two hours. :grin:

I do wish that BMW would follow the aircraft world and use dzus fasteners. They are fast, highly vibration resistant and the fasteners are captive so no screws to keep track of or lose in the grass or mud during a field repair. I am sure they cost enough more than screws and wellnuts to cause BMW not to use them. They certainly would make the bodywork removal much faster.
 
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It is a nuisance to be sure, but only takes two hours the first time. I can pretty well strip mine down in 30 minutes now. Still 30 wasted minutes, but better than two hours. :grin:

I do wish that BMW would follow the aircraft world and use dzus fasteners. They are fast, highly vibration resistant and the fasteners are captive so no screws to keep track of or lose in the grass or mud during a field repair. I am sure they cost enough more than screws and wellnuts to cause BMW not to use them. They certainly would make the bodywork removal much faster.
For for [email protected]$t and Giggles, I crew a few 24 hours race attempts, the 24 of Susuka and races like those are totally legendary if you ask me, plus a few multi day rally races.. (I like the stress and the challenge of lack of resources, emergency fixes and adverse conditions

tell me about the Dzus speed, specially when you have a purpose made one piece fiber/epoxy fairing..

complete shell drops on 10 seconds maybe less, changing wheels on the 10's even if now about 3 seconds is the norm (with super clever machine sliders for the wheels and axles

Rivnuts are pretty useful too if they are install correctly and don't end up Spinning, holding the bolts with them.. (I hate those)

For the LT I just take two of my little Milwaukee M12's with the proper torx bit some extensions and go to town, (90 deggre and study impact) never measure the time but is pretty fast (for sure less than 20 minutes to take everything off and as long as the fairing nuts (campitive metal flips) don't give you trouble about the same to build her back up (On the street floor, no stand, no help.)

Tip from Insurance agent: I use to think I was really smart riding my sport bikes without fairing until one day my agent ask me "What are you doing Ricky...??"

"Ride them with the plastic dummy, if somebody crash into you the cost of the fairing will total the bike, but you still have a perfect bike right under it"

very wise advice, since then I learn a lot and purchase most of my bikes "Total" but with very small cosmetic damage (That cost silly money to Replace or make perfect again" but still totally functional if you don't care it looks a little wonky..
 

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Not attempting to take over this thread but since some of you mentioned my first / favorite color LT - here is a shot of mine just floating in the garage . . . :alien:



Now back to your normal channel . . .
 

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2005 K1200LT
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I love the new "invisa-lift" where did you get it?
 
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I love the new "invisa-lift" where did you get it?
It is called a Photoshop lift. Latest and greatest technology. :grin:
 

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It is called a Photoshop lift. Latest and greatest technology. :grin:
If it's a simple photoshop it's a good one. you can see the background through the wheel spokes and what is most impressive is the objects seen behind the screen. look at the optical distortion on the box behind it.
 
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