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Discussion Starter #1
One decade later......
Bought my K1200LT Icon in July 2000.
Sorta close to 10 years now, huh?
About 80,000 miles now. (Well excuse me, but I do have other bikes I ride occasionally, 70's Airheads).

The KLT is my favorite for any real distance riding.

It isn't too heavy (unless you're trying to pick it up, so..... don't drop it, stupid)
Keep the CG over the wheels and it isn't heavy.

It has plenty of power. (I mean, seriously, when you have so much power you don't need to shift anymore the sport sort of goes out of it doesn't it?)

I like this bike more today than I did the day I bought it. Those of you just discovering the BMW K1200LT or are considering buying one, this is a remarkable machine.

I just got back from riding over to Mt. Manadnock in NH for a hike. The trail head I use is up a bumpy, rocky, potholed, gravel, dirt, wash that isn't maintained and is closed in winter. The KLT negotiates this kind of road just fine, (don't go to fast or you'll bottom out the skid plate (you do have a skid plate, don't you?)).
Reportedly, Mt Manadnock is the second most climbed mountian in the world. So, what's the first?)

Nice ride over to the mountian, and then home again in the rain. My bike is a workhorse (LT: light truck or little truck), a long distance touring machine, and a suprisingly nimble sports tourer when you crank it up.

I do love this bike.
 

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I would have to agree!!
Even after a final drive failure, it is the best bike I have ever owned.
 

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I like what you said about liking it now more than when you first bought it. Me too! It took me about 3-5,000 miles to really get comfortable on it and know what it would do.

The miles and this forum have really given me a real appreciation for the bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
seahabit said:
My guess is Mt. Evans in Colorado
Not Mt. Evans......think Far East:

Climbing Mount Fiji is an adventurous sport and it starts from July 1st to August 27th. The rising of the sun can be seen from this place and more people climb the mountain during the night in order to see the sun rising. Every year, over 200,000 people are expected to climb the mountains, out of that, 30% of the people are from the western countries. Also, there has been a paragliding from Subashiri and Hoeizan. There is a forest named Aokigahara, which is located at the bottom of the mountain. This forest is known to be the suicide spot with an average of 30 suicides every year.

The earliest recorded ascent of Mount Monadnock took place in 1725 by Captain Samuel Willard and fourteen rangers under his command who camped at the top and used the summit as a lookout while patrolling for Native Americans. Before the practice came to be frowned upon, many early hikers carved their names in the summit; the earliest such engraving reads "S. Dakin, 1801" and is attributed to a local town clerk.[4]

Notable "power hiking" records associated with the mountain include that of Garry Harrington who hiked to the summit sixteen times in a twenty-four hour period and Larry Davis, who claimed to have hiked to the summit daily for 2,850 consecutive days (7.8 years). [5][6]

Mount Monadnock is often promoted as the most hiked mountain in the United States as well as the second most hiked mountain in the world, with 125,000 hikers yearly,[4] behind Mount Fuji in Japan, with about 200,000 yearly hikers. Bus routes that head part way up Mount Fuji opened in 1990, however, even from that base, each person who reaches the summit of Mount Fuji has climbed about 5,000 feet (1,500 m), more than twice the ascent of Mount Monadnock.[7] Neither mountain comes close in popularity to Tai Shan in China, with more than 2 million visitors a year.[8]

But here's a mountian you can ride your KLT up: http://www.mtwashingtonautoroad.com/
See the CCR 2010 routes for a ride to the Mt. Washington Auto Road. Very memorable ride!
 

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Charlie, that's some powerful information. Those old timers ascended using old school methods. No deet, nylon parkas or tennis shoes (my favorite hiking shoe). Great pics too. Thank you for the post.
 

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The earliest recorded ascent of Mount Monadnock took place in 1725 by Captain Samuel Willard and fourteen rangers under his command who camped at the top and used the summit as a lookout while patrolling for Native Americans. Charlie Vt

Well, by Mt. Washington standards that's pretty recent. Mt. Washington was first climbed in 1642 by Darby Field. To put that in perspective, it's just 22 years after the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock.

Not that this is a lame attempt to hijack the thread. I do want to agree with CharlieVT that the LT is quite capable on some pretty treacherous goat paths. LAF and I managed to negotiate a fouled up, muddy, rock strewn, potholed section of road in upstate New York this summer. It is a pretty amazing bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Tracus said:
The earliest recorded ascent of Mount Monadnock took place in 1725 by Captain Samuel Willard and fourteen rangers under his command who camped at the top and used the summit as a lookout while patrolling for Native Americans. Charlie Vt

Well, by Mt. Washington standards that's pretty recent. Mt. Washington was first climbed in 1642 by Darby Field. To put that in perspective, it's just 22 years after the Pilgrims at Plymouth Rock.

Not that this is a lame attempt to hijack the thread. I do want to agree with CharlieVT that the LT is quite capable on some pretty treacherous goat paths. LAF and I managed to negotiate a fouled up, muddy, rock strewn, potholed section of road in upstate New York this summer. It is a pretty amazing bike.
"Not that this is a lame attempt to hijack the thread....." Hey, I hijacked my own thread before you got to it. :histerica

My KLT has been up Mt. Washington several times. Boy, has the summit changed over the years. I used to hike up there in the 60s and 70s, there was a hotel, auto road, railroad then, but now there's a modern concrete visitor's center, bookstore, gift shop, resturant, museum, in addition to the weather station, communication antennas, etc. It really is a neat ride up and a neat place on the summit. It's just that if you hike up Huntington Ravine in solitude and then find this big parking lot at the summit, well.... the madding crowds.
 

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CharlieVT said:
I just got back from riding over to Mt. Manadnock in NH for a hike. The trail head I use is up a bumpy, rocky, potholed, gravel, dirt, wash that isn't maintained and is closed in winter. The KLT negotiates this kind of road just fine, (don't go to fast or you'll bottom out the skid plate (you do have a skid plate, don't you?)).
I love my LT as well. I got back a few weeks ago from a 3,600 mile ride up north that included about one hundred miles on rough dirt roads. Other than a broken front fender & having to tape the front mirrors on the bike handled fine. :thumb:
 

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CharlieVT said:
One decade later......
Bought my K1200LT Icon in July 2000.
Sorta close to 10 years now, huh?
About 80,000 miles now. (Well excuse me, but I do have other bikes I ride occasionally, 70's Airheads).

The KLT is my favorite for any real distance riding.

It isn't too heavy (unless you're trying to pick it up, so..... don't drop it, stupid)
Keep the CG over the wheels and it isn't heavy.

It has plenty of power. (I mean, seriously, when you have so much power you don't need to shift anymore the sport sort of goes out of it doesn't it?)

I like this bike more today than I did the day I bought it. Those of you just discovering the BMW K1200LT or are considering buying one, this is a remarkable machine.

I just got back from riding over to Mt. Manadnock in NH for a hike. The trail head I use is up a bumpy, rocky, potholed, gravel, dirt, wash that isn't maintained and is closed in winter. The KLT negotiates this kind of road just fine, (don't go to fast or you'll bottom out the skid plate (you do have a skid plate, don't you?)).
Reportedly, Mt Manadnock is the second most climbed mountian in the world. So, what's the first?)

Nice ride over to the mountian, and then home again in the rain. My bike is a workhorse (LT: light truck or little truck), a long distance touring machine, and a suprisingly nimble sports tourer when you crank it up.

I do love this bike.
How many times have you replaced your FD and clutch?

I have only 3 years and 20,000 on my LT, but I pretty much agree with your assessment. I will likely change my tune somewhat after my first FD, slave cylinder, transmission seal, clutch failure ... but so far, so good!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Voyager said:
How many times have you replaced your FD and clutch?

I have only 3 years and 20,000 on my LT, but I pretty much agree with your assessment. I will likely change my tune somewhat after my first FD, slave cylinder, transmission seal, clutch failure ... but so far, so good!
I have not had any failures.
I did a preemptive rebuild of my final drive at 30,000 miles just because I was curious because of reports of failures I read about on this board. (final drives have become a hobby of mine, but I have never experienced a failure).
I drilled a clutch slave weep hole and replaced my clutch slave while I was in there. I did that just for the fun of it too. (Again, the fault of this board). I have never had a seal leak, or clutch problem.

I do consider that the bike is defective with respect to tires; I mean the bike wears out tires way too fast. (I suppose I could change the way I ride?....... naw.) :)
 

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How many times have you replaced your FD and clutch?

I have only 3 years and 20,000 on my LT, but I pretty much agree with your assessment. I will likely change my tune somewhat after my first FD, slave cylinder, transmission seal, clutch failure ... but so far, so good!
__________________

Hey Voyager, I'm in the same boat: about 3 years and 24,000 miles. Difference is that I did have a main seal leak, and luckily found my FD bearing failing prior to being stranded. I replaced the clutch, seals, slave, and rebuilt the FD. Even with that, I'm in no way discouraged.
In fact, I'm more confident in the bike now than ever before. I have 78,000 on the bike, and no worries.
 

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fpmlt said:
How many times have you replaced your FD and clutch?

I have only 3 years and 20,000 on my LT, but I pretty much agree with your assessment. I will likely change my tune somewhat after my first FD, slave cylinder, transmission seal, clutch failure ... but so far, so good!
__________________

Hey Voyager, I'm in the same boat: about 3 years and 24,000 miles. Difference is that I did have a main seal leak, and luckily found my FD bearing failing prior to being stranded. I replaced the clutch, seals, slave, and rebuilt the FD. Even with that, I'm in no way discouraged.
In fact, I'm more confident in the bike now than ever before. I have 78,000 on the bike, and no worries.
I hope to not have to do that as I don't have a lift and it appears that pulling the tranny without a lift is not an easy task. I also don't have a good hoist to hold up the rear of the bike. I have had it pretty well stripped of tupperware several times now, so no longer any angst about that. :)

I have the mechanical ability to do the FD and clutch work, but just don't think one should have to do that on a $21,000 motorcycle! Hopefully, I don't have to gain that experience, but one never knows.

However, for now I "just ride it" and what will be will be. :)
 

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Right on Charlies. I to have a 2000 KLT. I only have one problem with it. It has only 51,000 mile on it an should have at least 10,00 +.
I know I better get to riding more. The shameful thing is I have not put 1 mile on it yet this year. It is hell getting older, not old. I now have almost as many replacement part as I have put on the bike. This last surgery , puts my total to 9 new parts.

Hope to see every one on the road soon.

George



CharlieVT said:
One decade later......
Bought my K1200LT Icon in July 2000.
Sorta close to 10 years now, huh?
About 80,000 miles now. (Well excuse me, but I do have other bikes I ride occasionally, 70's Airheads).

The KLT is my favorite for any real distance riding.

It isn't too heavy (unless you're trying to pick it up, so..... don't drop it, stupid)
Keep the CG over the wheels and it isn't heavy.

It has plenty of power. (I mean, seriously, when you have so much power you don't need to shift anymore the sport sort of goes out of it doesn't it?)

I like this bike more today than I did the day I bought it. Those of you just discovering the BMW K1200LT or are considering buying one, this is a remarkable machine.

I just got back from riding over to Mt. Manadnock in NH for a hike. The trail head I use is up a bumpy, rocky, potholed, gravel, dirt, wash that isn't maintained and is closed in winter. The KLT negotiates this kind of road just fine, (don't go to fast or you'll bottom out the skid plate (you do have a skid plate, don't you?)).
Reportedly, Mt Manadnock is the second most climbed mountian in the world. So, what's the first?)

Nice ride over to the mountian, and then home again in the rain. My bike is a workhorse (LT: light truck or little truck), a long distance touring machine, and a suprisingly nimble sports tourer when you crank it up.

I do love this bike.
 
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