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Discussion Starter #1
Well I'll get right to it, I've worn my rear tire to the point that the silver threads are just about to show at one point. The dealership is approximately 60 miles away. I don't have a trailer, but a 2500 truck with an 8' box, so I could put it in the bed. I also don't have a ramp to get it into the bed and have only loaded/strapped a bike into a bed of a truck once. I've never pulled the front or rear tire of a bike. This is my second bike, my other is a HD FLHR, but I've always caught the rear tire before it got to this point. I noticed the threads in the tire yesterday. I've been watching the rear tire tread, but was a bit confused as to the wear indicators. Looking at the Rider's Manual, it explains how to pull the front and rear tire. I've seen another thread that mentions pulling the front tire. Do I need the front wheel stand to pull the front tire off? Can I pull both off at the same time? Alright...suggestions, recommendations, directions, and comments? (I don't think anyone could make me feel worse than I do, as this is my major mode of transportation and riding is my passion) I'm going to be in a bad mood for the next few weeks.

Thanks in advance,
John
 

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Since your problem is the rear wheel, I'd suggest taking it off and taking it to a place where a new tire can be installed (dealer or not).

To remove the rear wheel, put the bike up on its center stand. Loosen the nut between the tail pipe and the catalytic converter under the transmission. Just loosen it to where it will slide around.

Remove the bolt that attaches the muffler to the frame. I believe it's a Torx 40 or 45.

Rotate the muffler counterclockwise (from the rear) so that it's pointing out to the side of the bike. This gives room for the rear wheel to be removed.

Using a Torx 50 tool, remove the 5 lug nuts and roll the wheel out from under the bike.

If you don't have the Torx sockets, get a set from an auto supply store; you'll need them for other things along the way.

To install the wheel with the new tire, basically reverse the steps. I don't torque the lug nuts, but many do, and it's a good idea if you're not used to doing automotive work. None of the fasteners in this project require a lot of force, so don't strip anything out.

Front wheel is much more involved, IMO, so my suggestion is to do the rear wheel locally if you can, and then ride the bike to wherever you get a front tire and let them do it. For most riders, the rear wears out much faster than the rear.

Hope this helps your dilemma.
 

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Riding on the Blue Ridge Parkway on my Buell was too much for the Pirelli Corsa with 2500 miles. I had the inch wide steel strip showing at the end of the day's gas stop. Someone pointed it out to me when I was filling up. The next day was Sunday and I was going to the Dragon. I rode carefully to the nearest bike shop. (H-D) and they had Buell tires aside and stayed late to take me in and slap on the new rubber. Was I nervous riding it. Yes. Did I know it was bald before someone pointed it out? No! But then I was on the side of the tire most of that day unless wheeling out of the corners. until the end of the day where the bike seemed to spin the rear rather than lift the front.

Of course I club raced and risky riding
 

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Fearnot69....

Well you got it right... Fear Not. Just put the bike on the center stand and take the rear wheel off.

Get in the truck and go to the vendor of your choice. New tire, installed at far less than the cost of taking the bike to a dealer. Dealer (?)

Both front and rear at the same time? .. yes but be aware the front tire is a few notches up on the special tools and expertise scale.

The bike will rest on its rear tire as you have noticed. If you take the rear off the bike will rest on the front tire. If you take both off it will need support under the front of the engine to keep the front end ff the ground. Not terribly bad but be aware that there are sensitive parts there.

You will need a special tool to remove the front axle of the RT. And, you will want to feel OK about removing and re-installing your front disk brake system.

You will need a good Torque Wrench. IF you don't have these things and if you want to get bike-involved... we can coach you through any of it.

Just ask.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks all for the responses. I kind of freaked for a bit earlier....my lawnmower caught fire a few days ago d/t a gas leak, I've got to get another, I'm switching jobs and have to work both full time for another two months to keep health insurance coverage for the fam., I would ride my FLHR, but the engine light comes on and off, no one can figure out why and I don't trust it to drive an hour one way to work, which I can't really miss. But back to the thread...
Seriously, I'm ignorant, but not stupid. @Siman00: good point. I didn't think of that. I feel confident that I could pull the rear and replace it. I was just a bit pessimistic considering my luck and the influence of Murphy's Law. Also, the dealer said I should replace both. With my HD you would go through two rear tires to every front. I know that both should match. The dealer doesn't carry the stock tire(?) and wouldn't replace a tire from another business. I negated to include that it is a 2010, obviously still under warranty, and I've got over 10,000 mi. on it. @ducatirdr: yep, the rear is not quite that bad. But I did ride the back tire of my FLHR to the point that the wires were coming out....I know that contradicts my earlier statement concerning stupidity. @hopz: I've been reading threads and just trying to learn more. I do have other newbie questions, but will try to not sound so green.
 

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I live in a part of NC where the roads are fairly flat and too straight. So, I wear out about 2.5 rear tires per front tire. And the rear tire wears out in the middle. I figured your ratio is probably different, but still should have pretty good tread left on front.

I usually buy my tires from a Suzuki shop nearby where they sell at 50% off MSRP. I'll buy in advance of need and keep one on hand. When I need it installed, I take it to that dealer or the CycleGear store closer to home. If it's a rear that I need installed, I ride the bike to the dealer and take off the rear in the parking lot; takes about 5 minutes. I get a funny look from people who see me doing what I'm doing at the shop, but that's okay.

Good luck on yours.
 

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FYI... just to be clear. Most BMW guys wear out the rear tire at the ratio mentioned... 2 to 1 or 2.5 to one. Very common, and for your dealer to say you NEED to have both replaced is just bumkum.

What he is really saying is they NEED the revenue.

I ran a Avon Storm on Front while I wore out two Michelin PR2's on the rear. No effect on handling or anything else.

You can follow the steps posted to remove the rear tire, but I want to add... you need to be sure not to roll the bike off the center stand while loosening the wheel bolts. Several ways to do this. Easiest is to put a block in front of the front tire to keep it from rolling. Another popular way is to strap the front wheel to the center stand- also keeps things from rolling.

Taking a wheel and new tire to a vendor such as Cycle Gear. If you do not have a Cycle Gear there is very likely an independent shop who will mount a tire for you. Mine costs $12. I buy the tire on line and it is delivered in about 48 hours. Typically 50 percent of "retail".

Other questions, just ask.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Gentlemen. Confirmed with another sports bike rider concerning 2-1 rear vs. front tire. I also had thoughts of it rolling off the center stand. Thanks for the recommendations. Also, once I wiggle the rear caliper open from the rotor, how do you adjust it back so I don't have any issues with the back brake?
I now understand that tread difference isn't a big issue with handling, but I will ride purposefully in wet weather. Any concerns with that? The stock Conti. Road Attacks seem to be alright. I don't have any issue with them. I do want a tire more for distance and not so much for the twisties. Not to turn this into a tire thread, but any suggestions?
Siman00: I work in Greensboro; I live about 46 mi.s north off 220.
Thanks in advance.
John

P.S. Is there a tread on here concerning performance parts for a RT. I do want to put on a high flow airfilter. I'm sure the air box/filter is on the right side of the bike (looking from the rear of the bike) How daunting is removing the plastic? Instruction? Seems there isn't any exhaust out there that increases performance. (As a HD owner, it was almost given that you rejetted the carb, with high flow exhaust and intake )
Thanks again,
John
 

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hopz said:
FYI... just to be clear. Most BMW guys wear out the rear tire at the ratio mentioned... 2 to 1 or 2.5 to one. Very common, and for your dealer to say you NEED to have both replaced is just bumkum.

What he is really saying is they NEED the revenue.

I ran a Avon Storm on Front while I wore out two Michelin PR2's on the rear. No effect on handling or anything else.

You can follow the steps posted to remove the rear tire, but I want to add... you need to be sure not to roll the bike off the center stand while loosening the wheel bolts. Several ways to do this. Easiest is to put a block in front of the front tire to keep it from rolling. Another popular way is to strap the front wheel to the center stand- also keeps things from rolling.

Taking a wheel and new tire to a vendor such as Cycle Gear. If you do not have a Cycle Gear there is very likely an independent shop who will mount a tire for you. Mine costs $12. I buy the tire on line and it is delivered in about 48 hours. Typically 50 percent of "retail".

Other questions, just ask.
I would agree with you most of the time. Until I ran to NC and wore my front out due to the crown of the slab and rough roads in the SW area. First time I replaced a front tire W/O the rear.....Yes I replaced the rear early due to a staple.
 

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I love the Conti R/As on my RTs, but there are tires that give longer tread life. Mich. Rd II's come to mind.
Also you may want to save your cash re: exhaust and filter parts for performance. Just taint worth it in my opinion.
 

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Fearnot... here we go again... next lesson in how BMW is not a Harley- and that is a good thing.

You do not need and should be worried about installing a higher flow Air Filter. First of all it will not make a bit of difference, yet it will harm your engine from greater flow of dirt. Yes, I am talking about K&N. They pass more air but also more dirt.

Next, Tires. Tires make more difference on a bike than you can imagine... until you actually try different brands. If you want greater life look into Michelin PR2's or PR3s. They have more long life rubber in the center and more curve grippers (technical term) for the corners.

Try a different brand you will be surprised.

You cannot re-jet a BMW they are fuel injected... no jets... no carburetors. (H-D too since about what 1995?)

You can add a different silencer but you will want to change the EFI Map. Expensive and hardly worth it, IMO

You are gong to need to learn how to take off the plastic. It is not hard, It is not tricky.
Look/read/follow this thread. This is for a Hexhead RT which is not all that different from your Camhead:
http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthread.php?t=39740

enjoy and get that old Harley stuff out of your head...
 

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BMW, Harley, whatever; it doesn't matter when it comes to tires. Tires and brakes are the two single most important things to check on a motorcycle IMO. Proper inflation adds to the life of a tire but my rears still are lucky to get 10,000 miles on them. I like tread on my tires in the rain.

Sounds like the voltage regulator on your FLHR either has a bad connection or is bad itself. It can be a ghost problem that can drive you nuts.
 

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Fearnot69 said:
I don't have a trailer, but a 2500 truck with an 8' box, so I could put it in the bed. I also don't have a ramp to get it into the bed and have only loaded/strapped a bike into a bed of a truck once. I've never pulled the front or rear tire of a bike....Do I need the front wheel stand to pull the front tire off? Can I pull both off at the same time?
John, I had a flat rear tire a week ago, thankfully I had just parked it at home when I noticed it was low. I decided to go with the ME880's and order up a pair as both tires were questionable. I was able to pump enough air into the tire to load it onto the trailer and take it to my mechanic. He put it on the centerstand, leaned it to one side, then slid a short section of 2x4 under the other side of the centerstand, then repeat. That gave the tire plenty of room to clear the fender etc. He pulled the front off first, mounted the tire and put it back on, then pulled the rear. It went pretty slick with the added height of the 2x4's.
 

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Fearnot69 said:
Thanks Gentlemen.

Also, once I wiggle the rear caliper open from the rotor, how do you adjust it back so I don't have any issues with the back brake?

John
John - a quick perusal didn't see this question addressed.

When you loosen the lug bolts you separate the wheel from the rotor. The rotor stays on the bike. No need to diddle with the rear caliper at all.

Reiterating what Hopz mentioned - be sure to secure the bike so you don't rock it off the center stand. I use a ratcheting web strap (temporarily borrowed from my pickup bed) to go from the crosspiece of the center stand to either the front wheel (if it stays on) or to the frame.

JayJay
 

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On my '05 I do remove the calipers as part of the service. You have to support them with a zip tie or string before you drop the final drive away from them.

Look at the 4th photo in the start of this thread...
http://bmwsporttouring.com/ubbthreads/ubbthreads.php?ubb=showflat&Number=131174&page=1

Just for the record... If you do remove the calipers and if you have backed off the pads... you do not have to do anything after reinstalling except to activate the brakes one or two times before riding off.

It is a self fixing situation.
 

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Hopz - the first time I pulled the rear wheel I must have been following these directions. I removed the caliper per the instructions, tied it up - and then wondered why. I've had the rear wheel off a couple of times since then and no need to remove the caliper.

It could be that on the earlier RTs (like your '05) you need to remove the caliper to get enough travel to rotate the final drive downwards to drain the lube. But on the newer ones like my '09 that have the drain plug on the bottom there's no need to rotate the drive down - just remove the wheel, unscrew the plugs (fill plug first, please, then drain plug) and let it go.

And if you do have the caliper off - don't activate the brakes until you get it reinstalled!

JayJay
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I looked at the rider's manual. Pg.s 116-119 include how to remove and reinstall the rear tire. Nothing about the rear brake caliper. I was confused earlier, as I was reading how to remove the front tire. I ordered a tire yesterday. Went with Mich.'s Road Pilot 2, from Revzilla. Hope to have the tire soon. My concern is removing and reinstalling the exhaust can. Seems you have to remove it to have enough room to remove the tire. A bit concerned with replacing the can, sliding the clamp to align with the clamp marking R/RT. I'll just pay close attention when removing and ensure I replace it in the reverse order. Reinstalling the wheel seems straight forward. I believe I have a torque wrench that has the appropriate range for the rear tire. I'll figure it out. FWIW I started it up and it seems to leak water at the point where the header and exhaust can attach. I'm assuming at the aforementioned clamp? Hope to be on two wheels very soon and doing this in my head! :dance:
 

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Fear Not Fearnot69... not to be redundant all over again.

Dealing with The muffler.... Here are detailed steps.
1. Get wrench
2. Loosen nut
3. Remove Bolt and nut up near the top.
4.Rotate muffler to Port side... (left for you land lubbers)
5. Bask in your glory.

Water? Ain't no water on this bike unless it is condensation from starting the bike and not riding it. Next Rule for BMW's. NEVER Start the bike unless you are going to ride it...


Sorry to be so long winded and complex....about the muffler.... Just loosen it and rotate it out of the way of dealing with the rear tire. When the wheel is back on, rotate it back and tighten the bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
hopz said:
Fear Not Fearnot69... not to be redundant all over again.

Dealing with The muffler.... Here are detailed steps.
1. Get wrench
2. Loosen nut
3. Remove Bolt and nut up near the top.
4.Rotate muffler to Port side... (left for you land lubbers)
5. Bask in your glory.

Water? Ain't no water on this bike unless it is condensation from starting the bike and not riding it. Next Rule for BMW's. NEVER Start the bike unless you are going to ride it...


Sorry to be so long winded and complex....about the muffler.... Just loosen it and rotate it out of the way of dealing with the rear tire. When the wheel is back on, rotate it back and tighten the bolt.
Thanks hopz,
I did just that...started it without riding. I'm assuming you accumulate condensation, which can lead to rust if not removed with driving?
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Can you hear it? :dance:
After five, 12 hour shifts in a row, I finally had a day off today. Pulled the tire last night without any difficutly and youse guys help ( I am such a wuss for being a worried) and found someone to put the tire on the rim. Cut some grass, replaced the tire, torquing nuts to specifications, took a test run, and everything seems alright. Got to get up in the morning to work another three to five straight again, but at least I can enjoy a little "Zen time" going back and forth to work.
BTW, the guy who switched out the tire was a little baffled how the Cont. Road Attacks wore. It seems, and I noticed, that they wear flat in the middle and the sides ride up at angles and not smooth. I told him the front tire wears like that too. Said, the guy who owns the shop, that they change many tires and he never saw one wear like that. Couldn't answer if it was from under or over inflation? Comments? Thanks again for everything.
Oh, one last thing. When I removed the can, I turned the key on to shift it into 1st. When I got everything back into order to take a test run, it stalled on me in the drive way and took a little bit to restart. I had to give it a bit of gas to start. The starter dragged a little, so I figured it was the battery being a little low from not being run. Got home and connected it to the charger. Read 100% battery, so who knows. I thought maybe it didn't like running the test to start with the exhaust open to air. Anyway, thanks again and that is all....

John
 
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