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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just put another new tire on front of my 2002 K1200lt, and I cannot get it to seat. I have tried everything I can think of. It seats all the way around except for a small 6-8 inch section on the right side. I soaped the tire and blew it up, but that last little bit just will not pop. Last night, I broke the bead and wiped ATF around it and blew it up to 80psi, but still no go. It seems like the edge of the tire is curling under and will not pop over to the lip of the rim.
Any thoughts?
It is a 120/70ZR-17 (58W) Metzeler Sportec M5 Interact:surprise:
 

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I just put another new tire on front of my 2002 K1200lt, and I cannot get it to seat. I have tried everything I can think of. It seats all the way around except for a small 6-8 inch section on the right side. I soaped the tire and blew it up, but that last little bit just will not pop. Last night, I broke the bead and wiped ATF around it and blew it up to 80psi, bit still no go. It seems like the edge of the tire is curling under and will not pop over to the lip of the rim.
Any thoughts?
It is a 120/70ZR-17 (58W) Metzeler Sportec M5 Interact:surprise:
You can try hitting the sidewall of the tire (where the bead isn't set) with a mallet with the tire at 60-80psi. Another trick is to hold the tire vertical and bounce it a few times where the bead isn't set under pressure.

Sometimes you have to exceed 80 psi to get the tire to seat. I've probably exceeded 100 psi, it's n
erve racking, but it will go on if it's the right size. If you have additional concerns about use of excessive psi I'd recommend contacting the tire manufacturer to get their recommendation. Or take the tire to a tire shop where they can put the tire in a cage to allow it to be inflated safely. Make sure you decrease the pressure and inflate to proper psi after it has seated.
 

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Use lard. Lubricate not just the seat on the wheel, but also, all around the tire bead.

If that doesn't do it, you have a tire problem. At 80 PSI, I calculate more 10,000 pounds of lateral force pushing the sides out. It should have popped without lubricant with that much force. This may well be a tire construction problem and it would give me cause for concern. If it doesn't easily pop at less than 50 PSI, I would take it back where you got and show them the issue.

Engineer
 

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That is interesting, Do you have any pictures to show?

BJ
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That is interesting, Do you have any pictures to show?

BJ
Here are some pix I just took. It is holding 80psi in this pic. I also forwarded all of this info off to Rocky Mountain ATV. I have never had any issues with their tires before.
 

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Put the tire out in the sunlight at the heat of the day and let it sit. It will seat. On another note a friend of mine that is a retired Yamaha dealer said that they had a tire manufacturer in their shop giving a demo (with a caged tire) that they inflated to 300 psi. with no damage. I did not see it but I don't doubt the story. I see no problem with 100 psi as long as it is deflated to normal pressures after seating.

Robert
 

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I just returned from Africa and saw a different solution. You need a plastic bag (like you get from the grocery store). Put the plastic bag along the rim so that the tire will slide along the bag and seat on the rim. Quick and easy fix and cheap too. (Look closely at this picture.)
 

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I usually have to take bias ply harley tires to 100 psi to get them to seat.
 

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Just another thought, did you polish the bead with fine Scotchbrite and mineral spirits to remove the bits of leftover rubber on the rim?

Robert
 
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Discussion Starter #10
Put the tire out in the sunlight at the heat of the day and let it sit. It will seat.

Robert
Your suggestion worked... sort of. I set it out before I went to work yesterday, but the sun went away and it was cold all day. This morning, I pulled it back, re-lubricated the rim/tire, pumped it back up to 80psi, then sat a small heater right next to it. I just went out to check and it has popped. I deflated it back down to 35psi and rode it around and it rides just fine.
 

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Had the same experience with some GS tires. Two sets in a row. Seemed like the internal bead diameter was 1 or 2 mm too small. Anyway, you need to clean the inside of the bead hump in the drop center where the tire bead has to go over to slide to the inner edge of the rim. This is where your tire was hanging up. I also use NoMar bead paste on that part of the rim if there is a problem. Larger tires like 190's or 200's on the K bikes and S bikes have to move the bead across a relatively shallow drop center. I always lube that area to get the bead to slide across. I get nervous at 80 psi too. Very rare though. Those two sets of tires were from China just as the manufacturer changed from Europe. Probably a different mold. Tires in question were Metzler Tourance, I sent them a note but no reply. An older rim will show corrosion inside and all that needs to be removed with scotch bright and a clean rage with something on it to help swab out the junk before lubing it well. Some tires are a battle. I had a guy in with a mid 80's Honda who wanted tires replaced. I spent half the job cleaning the insides of the rims of corrosion because I knew there was a problem. The owner said his tires were leaking a few psi each week. Bad sealing, no holes and stem was okay.
 

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Your suggestion worked... sort of. I set it out before I went to work yesterday, but the sun went away and it was cold all day. This morning, I pulled it back, re-lubricated the rim/tire, pumped it back up to 80psi, then sat a small heater right next to it. I just went out to check and it has popped. I deflated it back down to 35psi and rode it around and it rides just fine.
Yay! Glad it worked. Next time polish the rim and clean with mineral spirits. Removing all the rubber bits stuck on helps stop those annoying slow leaks.

Robert

P.S.: 42 psi is best for the front and 48 psi for the rear.
 

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I always run a strap around the circumference of the tire. Dunno if it was already mentioned but that's what I do. Works every time
 

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Yep, I strap mine also, helps start the sealing and seating.
 
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