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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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Discussion Starter #1
We all know the little needle bearings in the rear drive pivot wear "notchy" in relatively short order. The cost to replace them has continually gone up. My first set were $35 each and now I see they are $92 each :surprise:

I saw a Kirk video showing the new Emerald Island Paralever Bushing Kit sold by Ted Porter's Beemer Shop.

I just ordered a set and will report on them next week. Here is a link to Ted's Site for the kit.

I had long ago switched to the Rubber Chicken Racing Bushing kit but over 80,000 miles they were showing signs of wear and were coming loose. I am very impressed with this new design and think they are the final answer. Will let you know.
 

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We all know the little needle bearings in the rear drive pivot wear "notchy" in relatively short order. The cost to replace them has continually gone up. My first set were $35 each and now I see they are $92 each :surprise:

I saw a Kirk video showing the new Emerald Island Paralever Bushing Kit sold by Ted Porter's Beemer Shop.

I just ordered a set and will report on them next week. Here is a link to Ted's Site for the kit.

I had long ago switched to the Rubber Chicken Racing Bushing kit but over 80,000 miles they were showing signs of wear and were coming loose. I am very impressed with this new design and think they are the final answer. Will let you know.
Can you describe the load path(s) they use? The factory bearings are tapered as are the JL bushings. This makes sense for a bearing that must transmit both radial and axial loads and need to have zero play. These appear to use cylindrical bushings to transmit the radial loads. I assume they have separate surfaces for the axial loads, correct? Or are they tapered and it just isn't apparent in the pictures?
 

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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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Discussion Starter #3
All I have to go by is the photos and Kirk's video. The bearing "races" are not open through but are closed on the inside. The pins get bottomed out so the end of each pin is a load surface as well as the side of each pin. I think it is going to work out well. Plus you can shoot grease into them through a removable fitting.
 
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All I have to go by is the photos and Kirk's video. The bearing "races" are not open through but are closed on the inside. The pins get bottomed out so the end of each pin is a load surface as well as the side of each pin. I think it is going to work out well. Plus you can shoot grease into them through a removable fitting.

I hope so also, but I am skeptical for this application. Any wear on the cylindrical surfaces will introduce play that can't be adjusted out. Bottoming the pins addresses axial load, but any radial play will be there always and could cause handling issues, particularly if a resonance condition is excited. These are the things that keep engineers awake at night ... and are why tapered bearings or bushings are almost always used in such applications.

I look forward to your experiences with this alternative.. BMW's prices are now well into the obscene range...
 

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We all know the little needle bearings in the rear drive pivot wear "notchy" in relatively short order. The cost to replace them has continually gone up. My first set were $35 each and now I see they are $92 each :surprise:

I saw a Kirk video showing the new Emerald Island Paralever Bushing Kit sold by Ted Porter's Beemer Shop.

I just ordered a set and will report on them next week. Here is a link to Ted's Site for the kit.

I had long ago switched to the Rubber Chicken Racing Bushing kit but over 80,000 miles they were showing signs of wear and were coming loose. I am very impressed with this new design and think they are the final answer. Will let you know.
Looks interesting John. I was lucky to get my last set off Ebay from 2 different sellers for about half the new current cost when I got my spare FD and it was missing one needle cone and the other was already notchy.

Looking forward to your impressions especially in relation to Matt's concerns as I have not replaced the ones on the bike yet. Always looking for that better mouse trap.
 

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John/Matt,
Can you describe how worn, notched bearings affect the ride of the bike?
Thanks.
 

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John/Matt,
Can you describe how worn, notched bearings affect the ride of the bike?
Thanks.
The affect should be minimal until they get really bad. At that point the suspension might begin to bind as it moved away from the point where the needle bearing was aligned with the notches in the two races. You would be getting a cam-like action. I doubt it would get this bad, but in an extreme case, the needl rolling out of the grooves could distort the races into an oblong shape the might crack one housing or the other. This is unlikely, but would be the start of a potentially very bad day.
:smile:
 

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2005 K1200LT
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Discussion Starter #9
As far as the cylindrical play, the bushings I have would spin on the pins and not the races when they got dry. So I fail to see the difference since I did not loctite the pins to the bushings.
 

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As far as the cylindrical play, the bushings I have would spin on the pins and not the races when they got dry. So I fail to see the difference since I did not loctite the pins to the bushings.
I loctited mine to the pins per Tom Cutter's instructions.

The main complaint I have with the JL bushings is that they reused the factory pins rather than design their own with the bushing installed as an interference fit. My one pin was worn as my OEM inner race was turning on the pin also due to the notching of the race transferring torque to the race.

I think the JL approach, if better implemented, would be the ideal solution. Use a custom pin so the bushing can be wider with more bearing surface, use temperature difference during assembly for an interference fit to the pin and install a means for greasing as with the Beemershop solution.

I like most of what I see with that solution, but I believe, assuming it isn't tapered, that it is not the right design for this load condition. The BMW tapered roller bearings would be fine if properly sized. I believe they were sized for a rotating load, not a cyclic load. Time will tell. I hope it works as the price is competitive and the greasing feature is very smart.

As a point of comparison, I just replaced the bearings in my front load washer. The spacing of the bearings is probably 4-5" or fairly close to the paralever bearings. The load has a longer moment arm, probably 14-16" compared to maybe 7-8" on the paralever, but the static load is dramatically lower. I would guess maybe 30 lbs with a full load of wet clothes compared to probably 800 lbs or more on a gross weight LT. The washer probably sees much higher loads when imbalance is factored in, but I doubt the load exceeds 300 lbs. If these guesstimates are even close, that would put similar loads on the bearings, not counting impact loads on the LT which could easily double the 800 lb static load. The difference? The bearings in the washing machine are at least twice the size of the BMW bearings and probably close to 3x the size.

I can't find the size into and I threw away the Nachi boxes, but I think one was 30mm ID and the other 35mm ID. And both bearings and the seal were $75 with free shipping. I believe the BMW bearings are undersized for the LT. Might have been fine on a 500 lb bike, but I suspect still marginal for a cyclic application such as in the paralever. If they were twice as big, I bet we'd not be having this discussion.
 
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Wrencher Extraordinaire
2005 K1200LT
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Discussion Starter #12
It will be a while before I can report on them as they are back ordered until 7/25. I have to have the bike back together by this weekend. Guess I can always install them later.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
UPDATE! I received the back ordered items and the reason they were back ordered was for an improvement in the product. The design remains the same but the materials have changed. No longer are the threaded parts anodized aluminum, but rather steel. Not sure what steel but it is magnetic. I have yet to install them but will next month.
 

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UPDATE! I received the back ordered items and the reason they were back ordered was for an improvement in the product. The design remains the same but the materials have changed. No longer are the threaded parts anodized aluminum, but rather steel. Not sure what steel but it is magnetic. I have yet to install them but will next month.
That sounds like a significant improvement over being aluminum as far as wear is concerned. Do you think there will be any galvanic reaction between the swing arm aluminum and the steel threaded parts to contend with?

Can't watch the video again from where I am now but I think they were torqued lightly by comparison. Will have to watch it again later tonight to refresh. I may be remembering it wrong as I only watched it once back when you first posted this thread. Wondering if some anti-seize on those threads would be in order?

Thoughts? Do the included instructions mention anything regarding the dissimilar metals?
 

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2005 K1200LT
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Discussion Starter #15
I don't know where Kirk got the new torque values as there were no instructions from the MFG and nothing on their web site. Also the OEM pins are anodized aluminium so I wonder why Kirk though 80 Ft LBs was OK and not the 118 as per spec?
 

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Since there is no preload for a tapered bearing, I would think that 80 Ft LBs and using loctite versus the 118 without would be fine. It should not back out and cause an issue but I too am curious where he got his information.
 

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I don't know where Kirk got the new torque values as there were no instructions from the MFG and nothing on their web site. Also the OEM pins are anodized aluminium so I wonder why Kirk though 80 Ft LBs was OK and not the 118 as per spec?
That is somewhat troubling as it suggests there wasn't engineering involvement with this product. No competent engineer would fail to provide torque specs for a life critical fastener.

I had the impression from Kirk's video that he was swagging it. Since the OD is the same and the threads are still fine pitch, I see no reason to deviate from the BMW specs. Unless you use Loctite (see next) in which case you should reduce to account for the lubricity of Loctite. I can't recall if Loctite provides a recommendation, but I have seen 20% commonly recommended for lubricated vs. dry fasteners, but I am not sure if Loctite lubricates nearly as well as motor oil. I would check the Loctite web site.

I share Gordon's concern with galvanic corrosion. That might be another good reason to use Loctite as it provides some corrosion protection.
https://www.zipfastener.com/default/assets/Image/Engineering-Misc/Galvanized-template.jpg

I have to admit that this looks more and more like a half-baked product that had insufficient (no?) engineering analysis and insufficient product testing before release. The radical materials change so quickly after release and the lack of proper installation information suggests that the early customers are the beta (alpha??) testers. That is fine as long as you know that, but usually beta testers get the product for free.
:grin:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
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You are correct. I am attempting to get a hold of Emerald Island for additional info. They make quite a bit of after market stuff for the older BMWs. I just realized they are in Taiwan so I guess it will be via e-mail. Welcome to Emerald Island ? About Us

Here is Ted Porters link to their products: BeemerShop: Ei PRODUCTS
Have you called Ted? I found him quite responsive to phone calls and helpful when I bought shocks last year.

A Taiwanese company is nearly immune from a product liability issue in the US so that explains a lot. I do appreciate you and Kirk being a beta testers for the rest of us.
:grin:
 
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John, where did you end up with this? I have a squeak in the back of my LT and I suspect it is the bronze final drive pivots getting dry. It has been 18K miles since I last had them apart and greased them. I would like to find a lower maintenance solution and this is about the only other alternative out there.
 
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